Vanderbilt’s home winning streak ends with loss to Texas A&M

Five straight wins at Memorial Gym is no more.

The Commodores did all they could to come back from a massive second-half deficit, but couldn’t complete the comeback on their home floor, falling 89-81 at the hands of the Texas A&M Aggies in the two teams’ first and only meeting of the season.

Vanderbilt trailed all but three minutes of this game, struggling to stop the Aggies from getting whatever shot they wanted. Tyler Davis and TJ Starks led the way for Texas A&M, providing a combined 40 points and shooting 13-17 from the field.

This was a must-win game for Texas A&M, who was looking to end a three-game losing skid that has jeopardized its NCAA Tournament aspirations. A loss against an 11-17 Vanderbilt team might have placed them on the outside looking in. Instead, the Aggies got exactly what they needed: a dominating performance to show the committee that this team is still a force to be reckoned with. There were flashes of Texas A&M’s drubbing of West Virginia to open the year that led many to believe that it could be the team to beat in the SEC.

“We knew coming in that it was going to be a tough matchup for us, especially with Djery out,” said Drew of the mismatch in the paint. “Poundage wise, we just didn’t know if we had enough to contend with their size and length. We really didn’t have an answer for them until those last four minutes.”

For Vanderbilt, only one home game remains in a season to be forgotten. It will be the last time in their illustrious careers that Jeff Roberson and Riley LaChance step onto the floor at Memorial Gym in front of a packed house. The two seniors shined again in this one, combining for 44 points, with LaChance hitting six threes. Saben Lee had two triples of his own, adding to a night in which he was just a rebound and an assist away from a triple-double. Maxwell Evans hit three of four three-point attempts in an increased offensive role.

It was a bit of a new look starting lineup for Vanderbilt, with Bryce Drew giving sophomores Peyton Willis and Clevon Brown the starts, just the fourth start of the year for both players. They wasted no time affirming the decision. Willis forced two turnovers right off the bat, and tossed an alley-oop to Brown on the Commodores’ first offensive possession.

The rest of the half, however, was all Texas A&M. After trailing 5-4, the Aggies went on a 16-4 run, leaning on Davis in the post one possession after another. Savion Flagg capped off the run with a three-ball, leaving the crowd in stunned silence.

As the first half went on, the Aggies became increasingly confident in their post play. An injury to Djery Baptiste prior to Saturday’s game left the Commodores with just two big men in Obinna and Brown, and both ran into early foul trouble. Obinna picked up three fouls in just seven first-half minutes, and Brown picked up two, which forced them to play more passively on the block.

Even when the Aggies didn’t get the post looks they wanted, they were able to kick it out to shooters, including DJ Hogg, who made both of his threes in the first half. His second three gave Texas A&M an 18-point lead, its largest of the half. Another Saben Lee highlight-reel dunk ignited the Commodores before the half.

Vanderbilt started the second half hot, hitting its first three attempts from deep, but Starks continued to answer with threes of his own for the Aggies.

“The quicker they get a shot down down there, the quicker we get the ball back,” said Drew. “Especially when we double the post, that speeds it up. Usually there’s going to be action right out of that.”

After picking up two early fouls in the first half, NBA-bound forward Robert Williams returned to the hardwood in the second with a bang, finishing an alley-oop at the rim and subsequently hitting an and-one. Davis tacked on a rare three-pointer for good, measure, giving the Aggies a 22-point lead.

Vanderbilt went on a 29-9 run of their own to cut the lead to seven with just over a minute to play, and four with over 30 seconds, but the deficit was still too tough to overcome, and Vanderbilt dropped its second straight contest.

The Commodores will host the Missouri Tigers Wednesday on Senior Night, looking to finish their season on a high note.

Student production Out of Silence presents personal stories about abortion, reproductive rights

In the face of changing Tennessee legislation, students and local leaders come together to promote reproductive rights

Iris Cafe to reopen Feb. 26

After ceasing operations last week following the abrupt closure of Provence Bakery, which occupied the space, Iris Cafe will reopen on Monday. The cafe will be managed by VU Dining and will be open from 8:00 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thew menu will feature Peet’s coffee, espresso, hot and cold drinks, as well as pastries, whole fruit and sandwiches to go.

Campus dining will operate the space for the time being, though they are still considering other options for the future.

Douglas alum find strength in action after tragic school shooting

First-year Samantha Schneid was sitting in Microeconomics when she saw the reports that there was an active shooter in the halls of her high school. Immediately, she thought of her sister, who is a current student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Still in lecture, she began frantically texting her sister, fearing that her ringer might go off, and trying to reach her parents, who she assumed were as scared and confused as she was.

Finally, she received a text from her sister that she was hiding in a closet in a building across campus. Still, it wouldn’t be until hours later, when her family was safely home and the shooter in custody, that the full effect of what had happened set in.

“There was no sigh of relief until I found out that my sister was with my parents, in the car with them. That was just the most relieving thing ever,” Schneid, who graduated from Douglas in 2017, said. “I’m an alumni from Marjory Stoneman Douglas and I have so many friends who still go there, so after I knew my sister was safe, the first thing I thought of was all my friends there and hoping that the people I knew and loved were safe. It was just a very scary experience that day and it was something that washed over me. It was a feeling that was just overwhelming the entire day, and in days to come it’s still very mind boggling to think about.”

We need to mobilize to make a change because that’s the only way we can protect kids

According to Time, on Feb. 14, 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz entered Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida shortly before dismissal time with an AR-15 style semi-automatic rifle. He pulled the fire alarm, and for six minutes fired on teachers and students in the school’s freshman building. He then abandoned his weapon and walked out of the school with the other fleeing students and proceeded to walk off campus. He was later stopped by police and taken into custody.

Fourteen students and three teachers were killed and fourteen more students were injured. Cruz will be tried on seventeen counts of premeditated murder.

In the wake of the shooting, a number of current and former Douglas students have spoken out about gun violence and safety in schools. Though some political figures have said that it is too soon to be talking about gun control so quickly after a tragedy, Schneid says that it has to happen now.

“Even when I was listening to the news reports as it was happening, gun control and changes in laws and changes that politicians can make, that’s just something underlying that I always believed in and I think this just reinforced that belief,” Schneid said. “Even that night I was thinking something needs to be done about it and we need to mobilize to make a change because that’s the only way we can protect kids.”

In addition to demanding lawmakers make changes to firearm regulations, students are also organizing a number of nationwide protests to continue to raise awareness about shootings in schools. On March 14, there is a planned national walkout, followed by nationwide marches on March 24 and another walk out on April 20, the nine year anniversary of the Columbine shootings.

Vanderbilt first-year and Douglas class of 2017 graduate Abby Brafman returned home after the shooting and returned to campus days later invigorated to take action. Before leaving the airport terminal to come back to campus, Brafman opened her computer and decided to begin planning the is the Nashville March for Our Lives.

Brafman initially envisioned 50 or so fellow students would join her in a Centennial Park demonstration. However, after the first day that Brafman published the event page to Facebook, more than 2,000 people had shown interest, and in recent days that number has grown upwards of 7,000. Now, Brafman is in the process of planning a far larger event than she intended.

“I’m getting a lot of crazy connections from people who are somehow connected to what happened at Douglas,” Brafman said. “I just think anyone with human empathy relates to what happened at my high school and it’s not necessarily, you didn’t have to go there to feel the pain of what happened. Everyone has just been so amazing and there’s a great support system out there for me.”

At the moment, Brafman is searching for students who would be interested in joining an executive planning team for the event. She is also in contact with the organizers of the 2018 Tennessee Women’s March who have been advising her as she begins nailing down the details of where the event will occur, what kind of permits are needed and other parts of a demonstration that she didn’t even know she needed.

I just think anyone with human empathy relates to what happened at my high school

“People are begging me to tell them what the exact locations from point A to point B will be,” Brafman said. “It’s complicated with the city to find exact places to do it but I’m very close to getting that done and once I do that will really get the ball rolling.”

Since the tragedy a little over a week ago, Brafman said that she has hardly slowed down. While the sadness of what happened hits her in waves, her grief is overwhelmed by pride in the strength of her town and the passion that the victims of the event have for making sure this never happens again.

“I’m very invigorated right now,” Brafman said. “There’s definitely moments where I just sit down and start crying, but then I remember what I’m doing and who I’m fighting for and I just stand back up.”

Schneid is also involved in the March for Our Lives process, as well as a number of other events that she hopes will support the victims and raise awareness around school shootings. She and Douglas alumni across the country are working to create banners and signs of solidarity to send to Douglas, as well as raise money for Everytown, an organization that supports gun control and is helping fund the March for Our Lives.   

“I don’t think that grief has to subside for political activism to take action, I think that for me I’m still grieving for the people lost and the people harmed by it, I know my sister is still mourning,” Schneid said. ‘“At the same time however I think that to get through that grieving process and to continue to mourn, the process is to become activists and to make a change.”

Actress and activist Ashley Judd speaks at Vanderbilt

On Wednesday evening, actress, author and activist Ashley Judd spoke at Vanderbilt about her childhood, the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements and her work with various activist groups around the globe.

Judd gained fame starring in movies such as Twisted, Kiss the Girls, Dolphin Tale, and Divergent. This has provided her with a platform to speak on and support humanitarian issues. She currently serves as a Goodwill Ambassador for UNFPA and the Polaris Project. She also serves on advisory boards for organizations like the International Center for Research on Women and sits as Chairperson of the Women’s Media Center Speech Project: Curbing Abuse, Expanding Freedom.

Judd was named as one of Time Magazine’s Person of the Year for her role as a whistleblower in the #MeToo and #Time’sUp movements by speaking out about being sexually assaulted by Harvey Weinstein in 1996 during the filming of the movie Kiss the Girls. Judd’s story was told in a New York Time’s piece in early October of 2017 and was one of the first women to speak out against the accused rapist.

She began her talk by holding a moment of silence “for those in and out of this world who are suffering and the children who don’t have a choice,” followed by the Serenity Prayer.

we have transformation from the inside out that has become a national role model

She first spoke about sexual harassment. She said her earliest memory of harassment was at the age of seven, and when she told adults no one listened or took action. Judd then referenced her assault by Harvey Weinstein that occurred in 1996 at a breakfast meeting. She reminded the audience that she had been open and vocal about the assault as soon as it happened, but due to the lack of resources and mechanisms, the world wasn’t ready to take action until now.

“We have the non binary, non dualistic look at all of the horrible abuse he perpetrated and in that alchemy we can say thank you God that that is over and time’s up,” Judd said. “Time is up. And we can look at the egregiousness of it and look at the hypocrisy within our own industry and suddenly we have transformation from the inside out that has become a national role model.”

Judd went on to describe the changes Time’s Up is making beyond awareness. Time’s Up is a fund that helps find support for “peers in Hollywood” who may have not had the time, skills or services to process their trauma. The group is partnering with RAINN (Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network) to pilot a support group. Judd is on the board of Time’s Up and plans on bringing in behavior change specialists who help do “physical work that is purgative and gets the trauma and abuse out of the body.” The group also plans to help survivors confront each of their own stories, gender and sexuality equality pledges for entertainment agencies, and plan to do a “broad and precise” analysis of how the industry works.

Her activism began during her adolescence when she spoke up both on her own and others’ behalf. She described her family as “dysfunctional,” and lived alone at home due to her parents’ absence during 10th and 11th grade. Judd spoke about different role models in her life like her neighbor, who took on a motherly role when Judd’s father left her alone at home for a year. She also spoke of her maternal grandmother, with whom she credited with encouraging Judd to go to college.

Judd’s first incident in advocating in regards to sexual assault happened during high school. Her friend was being molested by the school’s gym teacher.

“I told her, if you tell me he does this again I have to go to an adult,” Judd said. “We can do it together, but this has to stop. She told me again and didn’t tell a grown up so I called my godmother, a local pediatrician who was a friend of ours and we put a plan in place.”

Judd then went to her French teacher, who she also had a close relationship with and went to the principal together. Judd’s friend’s family was upset that Judd had reported the issue and ruined the family’s idyllic image.

“That was my first pail of cold water- that doing the right thing isn’t always the popular thing,” Judd said. “But it is worth it.”

Judd began to interact with politics and activism during her undergraduate years at University of Kentucky, where she responded to racist remarks made by the chancellor’s by organizing campus wide walk-outs, protests of the chancellor’s membership on the Board of Trustees, and partnering with the campus’ African American sororities and fraternities.  

Doing the right thing isn’t always the popular thing

After graduating with a Bachelor’s Degree in French, Judd signed up for the Peace Corps before backing out to follow her dreams of being an actress in Hollywood. Judd wanted to be an actress since she was a young girl fantasizing about being the character in a book she was reading.

“I wanted to close my eyes and when I opened my eyes, I wanted to see, feel and experience the world as she would in her circumstances,” Judd said. “Of course when I opened my eyes, I was the same girl, in the same field, in the same clothes- but that’s the definition of acting; Living truthfully in imaginary circumstances.”

Judd was also inspired by Jane Fonda who starred in the movie The Dollmaker. Judd identified with Fonda’s “hillbilly” background and enjoyed seeing someone who looked and sounded like her.

In addition to starting auditions, Judd also began working at Planned Parenthood and became involved with a social justice church. While her career was taking off, she began working with Population Services International (PSI) as a global ambassador and help them evaluate their global HIV and AIDS prevention programs. She also worked with Bono and did a bus tour in the midwest to speak to communities about “why the HIV/AIDS emergency in Africa was also an American problem.”

She then told students about her most recent trip with UNFPA Reproductive Rights Agency to see how women friendly spaces are functioning in refugee camps in Koks Bazzaar, Bangladesh. These are places where women can take a nap interrupted by children, where they can receive information on gender equality and why boys and girls need the same amount of nutrition, learning how to spot and prevent sex trafficking with vulnerable refugee children, psychosocial support and trauma processing, the negative effect of child marriage on female reproductive health, coping with drug addiction and preparing for an upcoming monsoon. There are also creative activities such as henna, jewelry making, and singing and dancing.

“I don’t have the words to describe statelessness,” Judd said. “To not belong anywhere, to be unwelcome everywhere- it’s indescribable. My friend, Ajita, had four of her eight children die when their boat capsized: her ten year old, her seven year old girls and her three year old. There was a woman whose  twelve year old son was hit with a bullet and she left him since she thought he was dead, found out he survived, and they were reunited in a woman friendly space. Many reunifications took place in the women-friendly spaces.”

Judd also spoke on the maternity clinics, safe birth kits, and dignity kits that aided in safe in-camp childbirth and menstrual sanitation. She described how overwhelmed she was by how much the refugees wanted to give.

“People who have nothing still have so much to give and it’s part of human dignity to be able to give even in the most meager of circumstances,” Judd said. “My refugee family gave me so much on this trip, physical affection, spiritual blessings- it was so beautiful and so powerful.”

Judd ended her talk by having the audience stand up and shout self-affirmations. She encouraged the audience to read her trip diary on her website for a first-hand account on refugee living in Bangladesh.

Environmentality: Energy-producing workout equipment

In my group of friends, I am known as the “fitness freak.” I’m frequently spotted at Commons’ gym running, biking or lifting weights. During one of my many endeavors there, I thought about how strange the concept of a gym is. We use energy to use machines that use our energy. I began wondering if there was a way that the energy expended at the gym could go toward a green initiative, such as creating electrical energy. After my workout, I researched “green gyms.” My idea had already been conceived and put into practice, and it was successful.

The most well known green gym is Green Microgym, owned by Adam Boesel in Portland, Oregon. Boesel invested in sets of custom-made exercise equipment that uses the energy released in workouts to power different aspects of the gym, such as the equipment, entertainment and lights. Besides utilizing the energy generated in workouts, Boesel also made several other green decisions, such as using tablets instead of TVs since they consume less energy, having member-controlled lights and fans that are turned on only when needed and only offering reusable and recyclable materials, such as refillable steel water bottles and recyclable paper towels.

The benefits of his decisions are numerous. Not only has the Green Microgym generated 20% of their own power, they have also reduced their carbon emissions by 60%. Further, the equipment they use dissipates the heat generated from working out straight into the building. This process eliminates the cooling down process for the gym, meaning that instead of using 100 watts to cool down every machine, those 100 watts are saved, making a 200 watts net improvement. So, the Green Microgym has been extremely successful at both creating and preserving energy, making it an environmentally responsible investment that more gyms around the country should try to model after.

A gym like this could easily be incorporated at Vanderbilt. Take the Rec, for instance. Nearing 20,000 square feet of space dedicated to cardio and weight lifting equipment alone, the facility would easily benefit from implementing energy-producing machines. According to Boesel, in just 30 minutes, any given person produces between 50 and 150 watts of power. For an idea of what this looks like in real life, that’s enough power to run a cell phone for an entire week. Hundreds, if not thousands, of people visit the Rec every day. If the energy expelled by those athletes were put towards a purpose instead of just dissipating into the air as heat, the Rec would have the potential to be self-sufficient, and possibly even power other surrounding parts of campus. Vanderbilt’s electricity bill would go down, along with its carbon footprint. Therefore, Vanderbilt should seriously consider investing in these environmentally responsible machines– if not for its environmental benefits, for its cost efficiency ones.

I don’t think my drive to workout will be ending any time soon. I do hope, however, that my time spent in the gym will become more worthwhile, not only for my own health, but for the health of the Earth as a whole. If gyms such as Vanderbilt’s Rec begin to invest in energy-producing equipment, this goal could be achieved in just a few years. Maybe one day, students will actually run Vanderbilt.

IN PHOTOS: Lanterns Cultural Showcase

International students tell their personal stories

Plan your weekend (2/23-2/25)

Make the most of the last weekend before spring break by checking out any of these events around campus. For more options, check out Anchor Link’s full list.

Educational

Educational

What: Capitalism with a Conscience: A Conversation about Corporate Social Responsibility, Sustainability and Human Rights
When: Friday, February 23 at 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Flynn Auditorium
Why: Join the Vanderbilt Law School’s Hyatt Fund Board for their spring event Capitalism with a Conscience: A Conversation about Corporate Social Responsibility, Sustainability and Human Rights. Lunch will be served as Genevieve Taft-Vazquez, Global Manager of the Workplace Rights Department for The Coca-Cola Company, gives her keynote address.
Who: Vanderbilt Law School’s Hyatt Fund Board

What: OUT in Front 2018 College Conference
When: Saturday, February 24 at 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Where: Sarratt Student Center
Why: Join us for OUT in Front 2018, the 9th annual LGBTQI+ and Ally College Conference. The event will foster a discussion on issues relevant to the LGBTQI+ community and society at large, allow people to meet their peers from across the state to share resources, develop leadership skills and foster a strong community of student leaders.
Who: LGBTQI Life

Sports

Sports

What: Men’s Baseball v. UMass-Lowell
When: Saturday, February 24 at 12 p.m.
Where: Hawkins Field
Why: Support the Commodores as they compete against UMass-Lowell.
Who: Vanderbilt Athletics

What: Men’s Basketball v. Texas A&M
When: Saturday, February 24 at 3 p.m.
Where: Memorial Gym
Why: Watch our ‘dores fight the good fight against the Aggies.
Who: Vanderbilt Athletics

What: Vanderbilt Women’s Basketball vs. Arkansas
When: Sunday, February 25 at 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Where: Memorial Gym
Why: Come cheer on your Commodores as they take on the Arkansas Razorbacks.
Who: Vanderbilt Athletics

Cultural

Cultural

What: Lunar New Year Festival 2018
When: Saturday, February 24 at 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Where: Langford Auditorium
Why: This is the Year of the Dog, so naturally the Lunar New Year Festival turned to the Disney-Pixar film Up for thematic inspiration. Enjoy a night filled with a diverse group of performances that will bring to life the virtues of loyalty, honesty, and kindness that the dog represents.
Who: Asian American Student Association

What: Malaysian Festival
When: Sunday, February 25 at 3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Where: Alumni Lawn
Why: Ever wanted to go to Malaysia? Get a taste of what a Malaysian marketplace is life without even leaving campus. The Malaysian Student Association will be hosting a festival complete with great food, traditional costumes and performances right on Alumni Lawn. Bring a camera and some friends to recreate the trip you never took and experience something new.
Who: Malaysian Student Association at Vanderbilt

Recreational

Recreational

What: Lambda and Gamecraft Present: Gayyymes
When: Friday, February 23 at 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.
Where: Alumni Hall Lounge
Why: Lambada and Gamecraft are joining forces to provide students with a night of community building competition, complete with chips, veggie trays, and drinks. Get ready to roll the dice and have a blast.
Who: Vanderbilt Lambda Association and Vanderbilt Gamecraft

What: That’s How I Roll: Sushi Making Party
When: Sunday, February 25 at 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Where: Buttrick 201
Why: If you’re sick of trekking to Nama for half off sushi, learn how to make your own rolls at the JCF’s annual sushi making event. Students will walk away with a dinner of their own creation and the knowledge of how to successfully make a traditional sushi rolls.
Who: Japanese Cultural Foundation

Arts

Arts

What: VUTheatre Presents: Orlando
When: Friday and Saturday, February 23 and February 24 at 8 p.m.
Where: Neely Auditorium
Why: Check out VU Theater’s production of Sarah Ruhl’s adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s Orlando; the Facebook event promises to pique your interest with time travel, foam and people turning into trees. Whether you’re just casually intrigued or a true theater connoisseur, take advantage of the free ticket and find out what all the buzz is about.
Who: Vanderbilt University Theatre

What: UNICEF Charity Concert
When: Friday, February 23 at 7 p.m. to 8:15 p.m.
Where: Sarratt Cinema
Why: The Melodores, Vandy Taal and Harmonic Notion are taking the stage to raise money for UNICEF. Tickets are $7 and proceeds go towards the purchase of rehydration tablets for children in need.
Who: Vanderbilt UNICEF Campus Initiative

Health & Wellness

Health & Wellness

What: Survivor Self-Care Day
Where: Student Life Center
When: Sunday, February 25 at 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Why: VSAP (the Vanderbilt Sexual Assault Prevention committee) will be hosting a self-care day so survivors and supporters can take a day to treat themselves with coloring books, mug painting, journaling prompts and face masks.
Who: Vanderbilt Student Government

Editor’s note: Source of event information is Anchor Link and Facebook

Vanderbilt alum Jake Weisman launches new Comedy Central series ‘Corporate’

“If you’ve ever had to be in a cubicle, if you’ve ever had too much fluorescent lighting, if you’ve ever felt like, ‘This isn’t the life that was promised to me,’ I think you will relate to Corporate,” Vanderbilt alum Jake Weisman (‘05) said.

Weisman, B.A. in English, is a creator, actor and executive producer of Corporate, Comedy Central’s new dark satire. The series premiered Jan. 17, 2018 and runs Wednesday evenings at 10 p.m. EST.

Corporate focuses on daily life at American corporations and finds humor in PowerPoint and spreadsheet-induced misery. Set in a mega-corporation called Hampton Deville, the characters navigate awkward coworkers, Microsoft Office proficiency and dreadful conference calls. The brainchild of Weisman, Pat Bishop and Matt Ingebretson, Corporate takes a no-holds-barred approach to exposing and satirizing the dark side of corporate America.

“The show is about all the ways in which corporations are ruining Americans’ lives. It’s kind of like Fight Club if you never started a fight club. We’re not under any illusion that we can change the system, and we think that’s funny,” said Weisman.

After moving to Los Angeles, CA after graduation to work as a film production assistant, Weisman realized that the professional world is not as clear-cut as he once imagined. Dissatisfied with his job and eager to find direction, Weisman began performing stand-up comedy with friends and posted videos of his performances to YouTube. Eventually, Comedy Central executives discovered him. It wasn’t an easy road, however, and Weisman accredits much of his success to risk-taking.

“Everyone who does something is just someone who tried to do it and failed for a decade and is all of the sudden doing it. It really is achievable, you just have to be willing to give up the comforts that so many people will take right out of college.”

These days, Weisman spends most of his time writing and is a self-proclaimed “workaholic.” In order to succeed and continue growing in the entertainment industry, he points out that you have to work much harder than most other people. For him, finding his ideal job (and staying out of the cubicle) is worth the risk.

Watch Corporate here.

Editor’s note: Interview conducted by Priyanka Sheth.

Q&A with Carly Fiorina, former Hewlett-Packard CEO

Carly Fiorina came to Vanderbilt as part of the Chancellor’s Lecture Series on Feb. 20

Q&A with Carly Fiorina, former Hewlett-Packard CEO

Carly Fiorina came to Vanderbilt as part of the Chancellor’s Lecture Series on Feb. 20

Vanderbilt crushes Presbyterian 15-2 to sweep midweek series

After shining in the opening weekend against Duke, the Vanderbilt Commodore freshmen continued to dominate every aspect of the game in a 15-2 shellacking of Presbyterian College. Vanderbilt moves to 4-1 on the season with the victory.

The Commodores started 5 freshmen: pitcher Jake Eder, catcher Philip Clarke, designated hitter Austin Martin, center fielder Pat DeMarco, and third baseman Jayson Gonzalez.

Head coach Tim Corbin said, “It’s just five games, but at the same time, they’ve stepped in and played.”

Jake Eder made his first collegiate start and allowed just one hit through four scoreless innings of work. The lefty had four strikeouts and was in control the entire time. Eder was credited with the win.

“He’s got a good arm He’s got a nice delivery. He’s strong,” said Corbin of Eder. “That’s a starting pitcher in the making. You find him in the pitching lab all the time.”

The offense took an early lead with freshman Philip Clarke’s three-run homer to right field in the bottom of the first.

Vanderbilt tallied ten walks and stole six bases. This small-ball approach plated a run in both the third and fourth innings to put the Commodores up 5-0 through four innings.

The six stolen bases were Vanderbilt’s most since stealing seven bags against Auburn in May 2016.

In the third inning, Julian Infante hit an RBI groundout to score Ethan Paul from third base. In the fourth frame, Alonzo Jones, Jr. scored an unearned run after Connor Kaiser reached first on an error.

Eder was relieved by another freshman, right hander Justin Willis, to start the fifth inning.

Willis got into a jam in the top of the sixth inning, and AJ Franklin replaced him.

Franklin, a redshirt sophomore making his first appearance in black and gold, entered the game with runners on first and second and one out. Franklin forced Presbyterian’s Nick Wise to ground into a double play to end the inning.

Austin Martin had a terrific game as the leadoff hitter. Martin went 1-for-2 with two walks and stole three bases. He scored on a wild pitch by Presbyterian’s Grayson Stoneking in the bottom of the sixth inning.

Martin said, “over the fall, we worked on our jumps and our leads,” and this helped the team steal bases with ease.

Freshman Pat DeMarco entered the matchup with a .647 batting average, but went 1-for-4. He found other ways to contribute and had a diving catch in the top of the fourth inning that was worthy of any highlight reel.

DeMarco, after going 0-for-3 to start the game, crushed an RBI double in the sixth to plate Connor Kaiser and put Vanderbilt ahead 7-0.

Paxton Stover relieved Franklin to begin the seventh inning. Stover, a senior, had a 6.41 ERA in 19.2 innings of work last season. He threw two strikeouts in one perfect inning of work.

Julian Infante led off the bottom of the seventh with an RBI double over center fielder Guy Casaceli’s head. He was thrown out at home on a fielder’s choice.

Most of Vanderbilt’s starters were either replaced or pinch hit for in the seventh frame.

Kaiser lined an RBI single up the middle to score Garrett Blaylock and Walker Grisanti to widen the Commodores’ lead to 9-0.

Justin Wilson entered to pitch in the top of the eighth. After missing all of last year with an elbow injury, Wilson pitched a clean 1-2-3 inning.

In the eighth, Ty Duvall scored on a Blaylock double to right field. An error by Rob Greco allowed Grisanti, who singled earlier in the inning, to score and make the score 11-0.

The lead stretched to 13 when Garrett Blaylock scored on a throwing error, and Cooper Davis scored on a wild pitch.

Just seconds later, Harrison Ray tripled to left field to score Connor Kaiser. Ray scored on a fielding error to increase the margin to 15.

Freshman Aaron Brown allowed two runs to the Blue Hose in the ninth, but still earned the save.

Vanderbilt plays a weekend series against UMass-Lowell starting Friday.

FASHION: Warm weather wardrobe

Capturing Vanderbilt students' aesthetic, from Yeezys to yoga pants

Our willingness to adapt to mass shootings has dangerous implications

Since it was uncharacteristically warm for a February day in Tennessee, my friends and I decided to sit on Alumni lawn for the afternoon. Everything was normal until our conversation slowed to a stop, our attention shifting to the flag at the front of the lawn that had been lowered in remembrance of the victims of the shooting in Parkland, Florida. As we watched an officer walk up to the flagpole at the front of the lawn and slowly draw the flag back up to the top, I felt like I was watching someone perform a tired, old ritual. As I thought about how we always seem to be mourning the victims of another avoidable tragic event, I remembered a day that made me realize that we very well may be setting ourselves up for a future of more tragedies.

In high school, I worked summers as a pool cashier at my local recreation center. One slow, muggy afternoon, I waved goodbye to a father and his son. The boy, who must have been only seven or eight years old, was skipping a few paces ahead of his father until he suddenly slowed to a stop. He scrunched his face up, looking up at the giant flagpole that stood in front of the recreation center.

“Daddy?” he asked. “Why’s the flag at the top today?”

My hand froze mid-wave. Although that day was the hottest it had been all week, I felt a cold chill run through my body. As hard as it is to believe, this child was simply used to living in a time when having flags perpetually at half-staff is the norm. The flag had been lowered in respect to the victims of the mass shooting that had occurred at the Pulse Nightclub in Orlando earlier that month, but several weeks later, it found itself at the top of the pole again.

It terrifies me to think that students are viewing active shooter drills the same way I once viewed fire drills–a necessary response to a natural danger.

His question was all I could think about for the rest of the day, especially because I could never imagine my younger self asking such a question. A ten-year age difference, in the grand scheme of things, doesn’t usually mean much; however, in this case, ten years might as well have been fifty. It seemed as if we grew up in two completely different worlds.

That was in 2016. Today, in the waves of grief flooding the days following the mass shooting in Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, I found myself thinking about how we as a country are addressing the coverage of these types of tragedies. It’s been barely a week since seventeen children were mercilessly gunned down in their own school and yet, I can already sense that media coverage and public interest in the mass shooting is beginning to dwindle. Is the loss of seventeen lives beginning to lose relevance already? Is the pain and unspeakable grief that members of their community are experiencing not worth taking seriously anymore?

If you trace the American public’s reactions to school shootings over the years, you’d notice that we are adjusting back to our usual routines post-shootings faster and faster, almost at an exponential rate. Many would argue that the shooting at Columbine High School in 1999 was incredibly significant in that it made us think begin to think seriously about the threat of extreme acts of violence in our schools, and it’s continued linger in our collective consciousness. Sandy Hook, we assumed, was supposed to be the last straw. We thought that reform would instantly follow the horrifying murder of elementary schoolers, but we allowed it to just be another unfortunate event. We’ve gone from experiencing an excruciatingly slow recovery from such horrors to simply accepting them as a fact of life and moving on. But, as I realized from watching that boy at the pool, have we thought about the message we are sending to today’s children?

My hometown’s school district canceled class the day I wrote this so that faculty and staff could spend the day receiving extra training for what they should do in the event that there is a threat of a shooting. How did they explain that to the kindergarteners and first graders? From such a young age, they are already coming to terms with the idea that this is something normal or to be expected. Our society has caused children to regard unfortunate events as the default nature of our world. We are essentially priming a generation of children to feel indifferent in the face of horrible acts of violence and hatred, which can only lead to a future generation of adults who would rather focus on less urgent matters because terrible things are “bound to happen anyway.” It terrifies me to think that students are viewing active shooter drills the same way I once viewed fire drills–a necessary response to a natural danger.

By letting our guard down so quickly, we are teaching today’s children that this is something normal, which means there is nothing they can do about it too.

Approaching shootings with a diminishing sense of urgency is incredibly harmful. By behaving as if these horrors are just a fact of life, we are removing responsibility from both the perpetrators and from the people who have the power to change things. It makes us inactive, resigned. By letting our guard down so quickly, we are teaching today’s children that this is something normal, which means there is nothing they can do about it too.

To prevent a culture of resignation from taking hold on our youth, it is vital that we emphasize talking about current events while instilling hopefulness and vigilance into today’s children. If we remember to acknowledge and respect every tragic event with the same weight, we can slow the progression of desensitization and eventual nonchalance while ensuring that children realize that there is something they can do in this world. We should accompany each problem with a potential solution when talking to children about current events and remember to acknowledge the efforts of those who are working hard to impact this world in a positive way.

Some Parkland survivors started aggressively pushing for swift gun reform almost immediately after the shooting. We can’t let them fight by themselves while the rest of us allow ourselves to move on, subconsciously waiting for another tragedy like this to happen. We have to send the right message to today’s children and remind ourselves that this isn’t normal. We are easing ourselves into a mindset that accepts such occurrences as merely daily horrors. We must reject this sort of thinking lest we wish to normalize pain, suffering, and inaction in the face of threats to our basic right to live.

Across the Borders: What the U.S. can learn about gun control from other countries

Thoughts and prayers. This seems to be the preferred solution whenever there is an act of senseless violence in the U.S.– especially when it is gun violence. It happens time and time again whether it is a school shooting in Florida or a gunman in Las Vegas. It is the easiest thing to do in response to something so tragic. It is also one of the most passive things one can do. You can have good intentions and wish well to those who were affected. But in the end, thoughts and prayers provide the easy way out. They don’t require you to act or take a stand. They don’t change anything.

The U.S. loves to take the moral high ground. So much so that we invade other countries and dismantle governments. But where is this moral high ground when seventeen people are shot dead at a high school? Where is it when students are forced to step over their dead teacher in trying to get away from the shooter? Where is it when President Trump tries to blame the FBI for the shooting? The U.S. has lost its moral high ground when it comes to gun control. Shootings and senseless gun violence run rampant and unchecked in this country. The right to bear arms has become a weapon in itself.

The U.S. could attempt to be humble for once and take a cue from other countries on gun control. After a 1996 mass shooting in Port Arthur left 35 dead and 23 wounded, Australia took action. The government implemented a massive buyback program where private citizens could sell back their guns to the government. Automatic and semiautomatic weapons were banned. A national firearms registry was created and a 28-day waiting period was instituted for gun purchases. As a result, gun-deaths dropped by almost half.

Japan was actually the first nation to enforce gun laws, indicative of the belief that “guns really don’t play a part in civilian society.” If a Japanese citizen wishes to own a gun, they are put through a series of tests and evaluations. This includes a class, written test, shooting range test, mental health evaluation and background check. Purchases are limited to shotguns and air rifles, and the class and written exam must be retaken every three years. Off-duty police officers are not permitted to carry firearms and law enforcement instead relies on martial arts and striking weapons. As a result, Japan rarely has more than ten shooting deaths a year with a population of 127 million people.

Thoughts and prayers don’t sound so good now. Even more so, it makes the U.S. look complacent and weak. Thus, it is time to go a step further. It is time to follow up thoughts and prayers with action and legislation It is time to regain our moral high ground.

Let’s Talk About Sex, Vandy: Foreplay matters

Most people think of foreplay as simply the sexual activities leading up to sexual intercourse. So, for the most part, that includes kissing, touching, fondling, mutual masturbation, manual sex and oral sex. However, that definition is heteronormative because it assumes that any sex that doesn’t include a penis going into a vagina is not actual sex, but things meant to lead up to it. Or worse, that it is unimportant. It’s like saying that vaginal or anal intercourse is an entree, while everything else are just sides. While this might be the case for some, for others foreplay is a crucial aspect of the journey that is sex and might encompass the entire sexual experience.

Though foreplay, or outercourse, or whatever you want to call it is often glossed over, it is really important for two reasons:

1) Taking your time during the sexual encounter allows both partners to get to know each other’s bodies. Foreplay allows you to connect with your partner for a significant amount of time, if you go slowly, and creates intimacy which is not always sexual. According to research, there are erogenous zones all over the body that differ in women and men that can trigger sexual arousal. The nipples, anus and even back of the neck all have nerve endings which can be stimulated to create pleasurable moments. Foreplay represents a perfect opportunity to explore not only your partners body, but your own so you can find out just what turns you on in both that moment and for future purposes.

2) Whether it’s a casual hook-up or a relationship, foreplay can help to ensure that all parties involved are having fun and reach that big moment. Arousal is super important for getting the party started, but everyone’s engine doesn’t start automatically. Sometimes we need to be warmed up and that’s perfectly normal. Foreplay helps blood flow to the genitals and increases lubrication in the vagina, so that if intercourse does occur, it is all the more comfortable. It also communicates that you’re willing to give the necessary time and attention, which in of itself can be attractive.

Some people like no frills and want to drive straight into intercourse while others enjoy taking their time and engaging in everything under the moon. Whether or not you choose to engage in foreplay is a matter of personal preference. But, it is critical to remember that foreplay can be as equally satisfying if you make it that way.

Adverse effects of construction near Carmichael Towers brought to light in VSG Town Hall

At a VSG town hall on Monday morning, university administrators, construction representatives and students discussed the impacts of construction on the Tarpley lot on Carmichael Towers residents. On the corner of West End and 25th Avenue, the lot borders Greek houses and Towers 4. The event allowed roughly 20 students, especially those affected by the noise of construction, to voice their concerns and ask questions about the future impacts of construction on their daily lives.

Present at the event were Dean of Students Mark Bandas, Senior Director of Housing Operations Jim Kramka, Bob Grummon of Campus Planning & Construction, Construction Manager Brooks Rutledge and Senior Project Manager Sean Ferrell of Layton Construction, the company carrying out the construction of the residential colleges that will eventually replace Towers.

According to Grummon, the ongoing construction in the Tarpley Lot for Residential College A will be completed in 2020. Construction for Residential College B will begin in May of 2019, with construction for Residential College C starting a year after that. The entire West End project will be complete in 2023, in time for the university’s one hundred and fiftieth anniversary celebration.

Students at the town hall voiced their concerns about the noise of construction during early mornings, which especially affects residents of Towers 4, as the tower faces the construction site. In addition, many students complained about unexpected blasting and explosives and a lack of notification for disruptive events.

In response, Rutledge and Ferrell said that in the future, construction will start no earlier than 8 a.m. In addition, construction managers are developing a more streamlined system of scheduling to ensure that Towers residents will be aware of blasts.

“A lot of construction workers like to start at 6 a.m.,” Ferrell said at the town hall. “That doesn’t mean that we’re going to allow that here. The message that we’re trying to send is that we are an extension of the university, and we expect all of our contractors to work with us. There will be a little bit of a learning curve, but you are the reason that we’re here, and you come first.”

In the past month, Rutledge said construction has occasionally started before 8 a.m., especially as trucks prepare to enter the worksite and create noise. In the future, Rutledge and Ferrell hope to prevent this.

A student living in a Greek house on Kensington Place, which is adjacent to the construction site, addressed the need for more regular schedules from the construction company about blasts and disruptive events. While the construction company emailed students in Towers a blasting schedule through the Office of Housing and Residential Education, students living nearby were not aware of blasting times. According to Grummon, while an exact calendar of blasting would be too challenging to provide, the blasts will be restricted to specific times (9 a.m., 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.) on days when they do occur.

Moving forward, we’re trying to give you as much notice as possible of things that will be disruptive.

“An exact schedule of every day will be a little bit hard to provide,” Grummon said. “The construction company is very fluid and will tackle everything the best they can, but sometimes they have to go back and deal with something. We do need some flexibility.”

According to Rutledge, some construction situations will warrant the need to work outside of usual hours to prevent traffic buildups on 25th Avenue and West End, such as concrete placement.

“With the exception of those things which you should know about a day or so in advance, we are literally not letting guys into the job site until 8 a.m.,” Rutledge said. “Moving forward, we’re trying to give you as much notice as possible of things that will be disruptive.”

While Towers residents are concerned about the noise, the university doesn’t plan on changing construction patterns besides the 8 a.m. start time and blast notifications.

“There’s not a lot to be done in that regard,” Kramka said. “I don’t want to sound callous, but you could try earplugs. I use those when there’s construction near me.”

One student living in Towers 4 expressed concern over equal housing prices for unequal standards of living, suggesting that students living in converted Morgan and Lewis quads and housing impacted by construction pay less than students living in unaffected areas. In response, Kramka stressed that the current system of house pricing promotes financial inclusivity in housing selection.

“Vanderbilt is committed to a unified housing regiment,” Kramka said. “You pay the same. You don’t want people to have to not live somewhere because they can’t afford it. We have seen that in the past. Friends can’t move into a suite because their costs will increase. So we’ve been wed to this model, even when there has been construction.”

Construction at the College Hall A site. photo by Claire Barnett

To alleviate unpleasant housing situations during construction, one student suggested that instead of assuring that residential colleges have an equal number of sophomores, juniors and seniors, that Warren and Moore Colleges and E. Bronson Ingram be temporarily based on a point system lottery to reconcile the situation for upperclassmen. Kramka said the university would not change the current system.

“We don’t want to change that model just for this period,” Kramka said. “To build sustainable communities that start to develop their own personalities, we want sophomores to live there and build traditions and carry on those traditions for three years. That model is not going to change.”

In addition, Kramka said the university will not convert Morgan and Lewis quads back to triplets during this time period. When asked by a student if additional beds could be added to Warren and Moore, Kramka said that this solution simply would not accommodate the number of students offset by construction.

“[Converting Morgan and Lewis triples to quads] is not something that we loved to do, but we had to have space,” Kramka said. “We thought about adding a bed to Carmichael Towers suites. It was largely senior housing. We didn’t think we wanted to do that to senior students. We knew that Highland Quad had more sophomores and juniors at that time, so we made that choice. We decided we would continue using that program until this residential college program is complete.”

We recognize that this is not something that is fun to go through.

In response to concerns about the elimination of parking for construction, Grummon said the university would not be adding additional parking as part of FutureVU, in part because of the excessive costs of garage construction and FutureVU’s plans to re-allocate the use of space on campus.

“Vanderbilt is very privileged in that we have 333 acres on campus,” Bandas said. “We’re sliced through by 25th Avenue. The desire is to green up the campus and make it more pedestrian friendly and bike friendly, which involves removing a lot of vehicular traffic from campus.”

Bandas said the university was investigating ways to improve transportation options for students, both through ongoing Nashville mass transit plans and a potential discounted rideshare program.

According to Speaker of the Senate Molly Gupta, VSG is currently investigating ways to provide discounted Lyft rides for students and potentially initiating a shuttle system for students working part-time jobs or internships. These plans are still preliminary. For the present, Bandas said the university designated a number of floors in the 25th Avenue parking garage as F spots for students.

Rutledge stressed the contractors’ desire to minimize the effects and inconvenience of construction for students on campus.

“We want to be there for you, we want you to know our faces and names and for us to know yours,” Rutledge said. “We recognize that this is not something that is fun to go through. The result is awesome, but I know that none of you will have the experience of living in these new residential colleges.”

Commodores cruise to 7-1 win over Presbyterian

On an unusually warm February afternoon, the Commodores’ bats were hot as they breezed to a 7-1 win against Presbyterian College.

In the first of a two-game set, Vanderbilt exploded for a four-run seventh inning to seal the victory. Freshmen continued to deliver for the Commodores, with Austin Martin and Pat DeMarco combining to go 7 for 9 and responsible for over half the team’s hits in the win.

Second baseman Ethan Paul got the scoring started early with a solo homer to left field in the bottom of the first. Presbyterian starting pitcher Austin Paradis would soon settle in after that, shutting out the Commodores through the next four innings.

Paradis ran into trouble in the 6th. DeMarco sent a hard grounder into left-center and legged it out to turn a would-be single into a double. Two consecutive walks later, Paradis was knocked out of the game, and the bases were loaded with no outs for third baseman Jayson Gonzalez. Gonzalez grounded into a double play, scoring DeMarco from third base and extending the Commodores’ lead to 2-0.

After a 1-2-3 top of the 7th from freshman left-hander Hugh Fisher, Vanderbilt carried its momentum into the bottom half. Austin Martin started it off with a double into the left-center gap. Connor Kaiser followed with a single to left field, scoring Martin and advancing to second on the throw.

Presbyterian reliever Andrew Durden walked the next batter to set up DeMarco with two on and one out. The freshman delivered, driving the ball off the left field wall to score two and widening Vanderbilt’s lead to 5-0. Stephen Scott, the seventh Commodore to step up to the plate in the inning, ripped a two-out double down the right field line to score DeMarco. Vanderbilt would add another in the bottom of the 8th on a Kaiser fielder’s choice to bring the score to 7-0 going into the 9th.

Presbyterian couldn’t get much going offensively throughout the game, notching only five total hits. Vanderbilt starting pitcher Maddux Conger pitched five mostly uneventful innings, giving up three hits and fanning five on his way to his first win of the season. Freshman Hugh Fisher pitched two perfect innings before being replaced by redshirt freshman Reid Schaller, who made his debut after missing the 2017 season following elbow surgery. Presbyterian would break the shutout in the top of the 9th on a fielder’s choice to the pitcher.

The 7-1 victory added to DeMarco’s hot start, with the freshman going 3 for 4 with 2 RBIs and delivering his 11th hit in four games to lead the team.

“He’s relaxed, and he enjoys playing. Right now, he’s in a good little streak, ” head coach Tim Corbin said of DeMarco. “He’s a baseball player, and he plays the game hard. He plays to win and he competes. He’s played well, and he’s actually done that since the time he got on campus in August, too. He just really enjoys playing the game, and he’s fun to watch.”

The 13th-ranked Commodores will again face Presbyterian tomorrow at 4 p.m., followed by a weekend series against UMass-Lowell.

Provence Breads & Café shuts down operations

On Friday, Feb. 16, Provence Breads & Café permanently shut down operations. Satellite shops, including the Iris Cafe on Vanderbilt’s campus, halted service as well. The reason for the abrupt closing remains unknown.

Created in 1996 by Terry Carr-Hall to bring high quality French Artisan Bread to Nashville, the bakery and wholesale supplier had a 22-year run in Hillsboro Village. The shop served pastries and dishes to walk-in customers and provided artisan bread to local restaurants.

VUMC enters five-year agreement with U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Over the next five years, Vanderbilt University Medical Center is taking what is currently impossible in the prevention of viral disease outbreaks and working to make it a reality. VUMC signed an agreement with DARPA, the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, to prevent the spread of pandemics and contribute to the national effort of the Pandemic Protection Platform (P3) program. The ultimate goal of the agreement is that by the end of five years, a cure for any outbreak will be able to be developed in 60 days.

With recent outbreaks such as ebola, zika and chikungunya, the program addresses a global need for rapid responses to emerging infections. The Vanderbilt Vaccine Center has previously worked with many of these viruses, but the added element of speed in addressing outbreaks will impact their approach. Dr. James Crowe, the Director of the Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, emphasized the compatibility of the DARPA program with the center’s ongoing efforts.

“We’re the poster child for this,” Crowe said. “We’ve been working up to this for 20 years, so we pioneered how you take human blood and make antibodies from them like a drug and it really took us 20 years to get it to work efficiently.”

The five year agreement is a performance-based grant, meaning DARPA could potentially terminate it at any time. In addition to progress checks with DARPA at least monthly, VUMC coordinates with other collaborators that are part of DARPA’s P3 program throughout the nation.

Over the five years, VUMC will make four different attempts to successfully reach the 60 day response time. Crowe emphasized the capacity for improvement over this time period. 

“We had picked three different viruses and the last one will be unknown to us, they will give it to us and we’ll simulate a live event,” Crowe said. “So it’s basically broken down into four sort of sprints, and we’ll try to get faster and faster. It’s kind of like athletic training.”

After five years, the funding from DARPA ends. However, the impacts of the work could extend far beyond this program. One of the ultimate goals is to develop a technology platform that could be transferred to a company. The Vaccine Center focuses on discovery rather than manufacturing, so the technology could be given to a manufacturer with the capacity to respond to potential outbreaks.

“It’s sort of like building a company to be on call in case the government ever needs it, but they don’t want to pay for it at the end,” Crowe said. “They want it to be self sustainable.”

I think it could change how all of medicine is done

While it remains to be seen whether the ultimate goal of a safe 60 day response will be achieved, Crowe says that immense strides have already been made in reducing time. An environment of collaboration has contributed to a greater sharing of creative ideas and ensured that the project will ultimately achieve a shorter response time, regardless of whether the ultimate goal is achieved.

“At Vanderbilt–the medical center and the university–it’s been a very collegial environment so you get a lot of exchange of ideas and that has fueled our rapid progress,” Crowe said. “We have students from all sorts of programs, graduate students, people in multiple departments participating. That core nature of Vanderbilt makes this a good place to do interdisciplinary studies.”

The implications for success with this program could fundamentally change the public health tools for intervening with infections. One of the emerging technologies that Crowe cited was the insertion of genes for antibodies into a human body, allowing the body to make the antibody itself. While this technology has not been fully proven, VUMC will continue to explore technologies such as this to attempt to meet the 60 day target for the DARPA program.   

“I think it could change how all of medicine is done,” Crowe said. “It would really change human history if we could rapidly develop prevention for 50 to 100 infections, and really revolutionize how we do infectious disease medicine.”

Ashley Judd to speak in Langford Auditorium Feb. 21

This Wednesday at 7 PM, Ashley Judd will be speaking in Langford Auditorium on her role in the #Metoo movement and her experience in fighting sexism in Hollywood.

Judd was recognized as Time Magazine’s Person of the Year for her role as a “Whistleblower” in the outpour of sexual assault allegations in the entertainment industry. She will be discussing this as well as how harassment and assault are not limited by demographics, income level or job type. She believes the #Metoo movement is a not a phase, but rather a paradigm shift in how society values, treats and views women.

Judd is well known for starring in movies such as Divergent, Dolphin Tale and Twisted, which has provided her with a voice and a high-profile platform to speak out on humanitarian issues. Since 2004, she has worked internationally with NGO’s, grassroots organizations, governments and supranational bodies. She currently serves as Global Goodwill Ambassador for UNFPA and is the Global Ambassador for Population Services International and the Polaris Project. Judd’s social justice work also extends to public health and the environment.

Tickets will not be available at the door of the event. Tickets are available in Sarratt Box Office and are free to students and ten dollars for the public.

Vegan at Vandy: What I ate this weekend

Raise your hand if you love to watch people’s What I Eat In A Day videos on YouTube. Maybe that’s just me. I find it so oddly satisfying to peek into someone else’s life for a bit and see what they eat.

I definitely wouldn’t brand this as a suggestion of what you should eat to obtain any sort of health-related goal. This is just a thorough documentation of the random things I felt like putting into my body this weekend. I hope reading this gives you some of that weird satisfaction I’m talking about, and helps demystify the daily diet of a vegan.

Saturday

Green Tea and Chocolate Oatmeal

Usually I wake up in the morning and immediately chug coffee. For some reason, I felt like chilling out a bit this morning and went for the more zen alternative. I did some yoga, drank some water, sipped on that yummy tea and texted my mom.

When I got hungry, I microwaved a nice spotty banana, a pile of Quaker rolled oats and water for three minutes. At the beginning of this year, I moved into my dorm with a 10 pound bag of Quaker oats. I’m almost to the end of it and I’m very proud of myself. After the oats came out of the microwave, I added two huge tablespoons of raw cacao powder that my amazing mother shipped me via Amazon Prime for my birthday. Usually at this point, I’d add a healthy glug of maple syrup, but I’ve recently run out of my supply. Luckily, when you cook the banana in with the oats, it actually sweetens up a ton, so I didn’t miss the syrup too much.

Pecan Pie Lära Bar

After practicing the ol’ cello for a while, I grabbed a Lära Bar from the variety pack I keep in my Blair locker. My mother is also responsible for sending me these Lära Bars via Amazon Prime. Thank you, Mama.

Lay’s Salt and Vinegar Chips with Roasted Red Pepper Hummus

Around 6 p.m., I wandered over to Branscomb Munchie, the most abundant and plentiful of the Munchie Marts. I knew I wanted to spend my evening with a tub of hummus, so I made it happen. I needed some sort of vessel to dip into the hummus, so potato chips made perfect sense. That night was spent watching the British Bake-Off on Netflix sprawled out on my couch with my hummus and chips lying on my lap. It was dreamlike.

Leftover White Rice with Microwaved Red Bean Curry

I was still hungry after my pre-dinner dinner of chips and hummus. So, I scooped some warm white rice out of my roommate’s rice cooker and topped it with a packet of that Red Bean Curry in the pink cardboard package from Munchie. That stuff is highly-underrated; all of its ingredients are wholesome and it seriously sticks to your ribs.

Sunday

Banana and Pumpkin Spice Oatmeal

This morning’s breakfast was a variation on a theme. I microwaved another slightly brown banana from my stash of leftover meal swipe sides with a bunch of oats and water. When it came out, I mushed it all together and dumped in a large dose of pumpkin pie spice on top. I think of it as basically just adding cinnamon, plus a couple more bonus spices like nutmeg.

Matcha Green Smoothie from The Juice Bar

I genuinely wanted coffee at this moment, but I’d already left the house, so I walked over to Hillsboro Village to hit up Provence for a lil’ something and saw that it was closed. I tried to keep my spirits up, despite utter devastation, and went to The Juice Bar instead. I did in fact spend $11 of meal money on a green smoothie. Don’t worry though, it was worth it for the vibe and the aesthetic picture of it I took.

An Orange, Green Machine Naked Juice, Smoked Almonds

This is how I chose to spend my final meal swipe of the week. I know, I really went out with a bang. I don’t know if I’ve raved about these almonds yet on here, but dang, you need to try them. They’re the ones in the red little bag amist that random assortment of bagged nuts in every Munchie Mart. As someone who hasn’t eaten bacon in eight years and likely has a very blurred perception of what it tastes like, these almonds taste just like bacon. If you’ve eat bacon recently, please eat these almonds and let me know your thoughts. I need genuine feedback.

A Sweet Potato with some of that Red Pepper Hummus and Soy Sauce

Y’all, just try getting one of the plastic-wrapped sweet potatoes next time you need an extra side from Munchie. You microwave it in the packaging for six minutes, and when it comes out, you will think to yourself, “I should really eat sweet potatoes more often.” This sweet delight was topped with a hearty dollop of yesterday’s hummus and a little drink of soy sauce.

Lemon Lära Bar

Mmm. Dessert. If you’ve never heard of Lära Bars, you should absolutely try them. Way before eating whole foods and plants was cool, they were out there making the most wholesome energy bars with the fewest ingredients. This one had just cashews, super sweet and sticky dates, and actual lemon. I wish they had these at Munchie Marts, but if you’ve got a dope mom with an Amazon Prime account, maybe she’ll hook you up with some.

PCC to UCC transition to bring new office to further student support options

In July 2018, the Psychological and Counseling Center (PCC) will officially be replaced by the University Counseling Center (UCC). As part of this transition, a new office called the Office of Student Care Coordination will open as a way to support students in finding the support they need.

Samantha Garfield, the Student Health and Wellness Committee Chair for VSG, has worked closely with the PCC during this transition. Garfield hopes the transition and the new office will increase student ability to receive care.

“I believe the new UCC will have a strong emphasis on diversity, transparency and accessibility of care,” Garfield said. “One of the elements I am most excited about is the Office of Student Care Coordination, located in Sarratt, which will house the Care Managers who can best facilitate and support students throughout their use of the network of care providers on campus and in the local community.

The Office of Student Care Coordination is completely new to Vanderbilt and will be housed in Sarratt 100. The Care Managers will meet with students in other locations in Sarratt and Rand temporarily until the office relocation is finished.

The transition means that the UCC will report to the Office of the Dean of Students, rather than the the Vanderbilt University Medical Center. As a result, students who have files in the PCC must transfer their files to the UCC before April 15th to avoid data lag of up to three weeks and potential delays in care. Students will be able to transfer their files after Spring Break. To transfer their files, students will sign off on the password protected website and that will allow for their records to transfer to the new UCC data system by the launch in July.

Students interested in learning about the UCC transition can find more information here.

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK: Dance Marathon, baseball, Nachde & more

Photos by Claire Barnett, Bruce Brookshire, Emily Goncalves, Ziyi Liu & Brent Szklaruk // The Vanderbilt Hustler

VSG to hold town hall on Towers construction on Feb. 19

On Monday, VSG will host a town hall for students to voice their concerns over the current construction behind Kensington Place. The event will take place from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. in Sarratt 216/220, and lunch will be available for students who attend. The town hall will feature dialogue from Dean of Students Mark Bandas and Director of Housing Operations Jim Kramka. The event will also include input from Campus Planning and Construction and delegates from the construction company.

The town hall is meant to be an open conversation between students, VSG representatives, Vanderbilt administration and the construction company. Students will have the opportunity to discuss the effects of the Tarpley Lot construction on their living situations.

According to Vice Chancellor of Administration Eric Kopstain in an interview, the residential college on the Tarpley lot will open in the fall of 2020, with West Towers coming down in May 2020 and East Towers coming down in 2021. The construction of the $600 million West End project will be delivered in stages, to minimize the disruption of students currently living in the area.

“If you think of E. Bronson Ingram Hall as phase one and the Tarpley site as phase two, there’s going to be a phase three and four for the whole West End project,” Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Susan Wente said. “This was complicated to figure out, because of the physical aspect of how current structures are connected with one another, and how we maintain and really make our commitment to students in terms of an on campus experience during these transitions.”

Fombelle’s Food Finds: Cafe Roze

A long trek for pretty coffee

Matt’s Traditional American Values: The importance of discussing political differences

I read the comments on my articles– both on the Hustler’s Facebook page and on the articles themselves– so I know about the reactions many have had to some of my arguments.  I also read the rebuttal articles that have been written in response to mine.  These rebuttal articles and comments never bother me in the slightest when done respectfully.  There is nothing wrong with disagreeing, as long as all sides are able to voice their opinion without resorting to personal attacks or mean-spiritedness.  If we try to shut down speech or prevent opposition, people will not be exposed to the best arguments from across the political aisle when forming their views.

In addition to the polarizing reaction to my last piece, a few other events reinforced my belief in the importance of political discourse and disagreement.  First, a professor teaching a class called “Talking Through Differences” invited me and a few other students to join a discussion they were having on immigration.  While immigration is certainly not the issue on which I am furthest to the right, I was amazed by how respectful the conversation was. There were about 15 students, pretty much split in terms of political leanings, and I was impressed by how much we fundamentally agreed on, despite some policy disagreements.  

Following the class, a left-leaning freshman student said that she had read my Hustler pieces, and prior to our conversation, did not feel that she could understand my perspective. Even though she didn’t agree with the entirety of my argument, she understood it better after our respectful discussion. These are the conversations we need to be having.

The second example comes from my Vandy Radio show, The Conservative VU.  This week, I had an interview with a classmate from high school who, following graduating from Harvard last spring, decided to tour the country to learn about people who were different from him and his peers.  He had meaningful conversations with different types of people, and viewed his tour as an eye-opening experience that helped him understand Americans’ varied perspectives.

This principle does not apply only to diametrically opposing worldviews.  I strongly disagree with a new executive board member of the Vanderbilt College Republicans who twice implied that being pro-life is an extreme and/or unimportant position that does not reflect Republicans’ belief sets.  That does not mean that I think he is a bad person or undeserving of respect.  I would love to have the chance to sit down with him and explain my perspective on why being pro-life is not extreme and is integral to being a conservative.  

Can we please separate the personal from the political?  I am not saying I am perfect either, as we can all get worked up about our views.  However, if you disagree with my views, can we please have a respectful conversation where we actually try to understand each other?

Plan your week (2/19-2/23)

Looking to try something new this week? Peruse the events below and make a point to attend something outside of your comfort zone. For more offerings, check out Anchor Link.

Educational

Educational

What: Reflections on the Presidency in the Era of Donald Trump
When: Tuesday, February 20 at 4:10 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Where: Central Library
Why: Join Thomas Schwartz, professor of History and Political Science, to reflect on the Presidency in the Trump era. If you’re feeling like a real history buff, you can also check out the new exhibition opening, “230 Years of the American Presidency.”
Who: Vanderbilt University Libraries

What: Chancellor’s Lecture Series featuring Carly Fiorina
When: Tuesday, February 20 at 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Where: Langford Auditorium
Why: Join Chancellor Zeppos and Distinguished Visiting Professor Jon Meacham as they welcome the former Hewlett-Packard CEO and 2016 Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina in the next installment of the Chancellor’s Lecture series. Fiorina will discuss her personal leadership philosophy, which values humility, empathy and diversity, along with how civic virtues are crafted in America today.
Who: Office of the Chancellor

Sports
Sports

What: Baseball vs. Presbyterian College
When: Tuesday, February 20 and Wednesday, February 21 at 4 p.m.
Where: Hawkins Field
Why: Support the Commodores as they face off against Presbyterian College.
Who: Vanderbilt Athletics

What: Watch the Olympics
When: Anytime
Where: Stream via NBC.
Why: Watch the best athletes in the world shatter records and compete for the coveted gold medal. Find out when your favorite events take place here.
Who: Team USA on the world stage

Cultural

Cultural

What: Actress, activist and Person of the Year Ashley Judd @ Vanderbilt
When: Wednesday, February 21 at 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Langford Auditorium
Why: Listen to the actress turned activist Ashley Judd comment on the #MeToo movement and the Weinstein Effect. Get excited and grab your ticket at Sarratt Box Office.
Who: Vanderbilt University Speakers Committee

What: VIBE ReMixed
When: Wednesday, February 21 at 9:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.
Where: Memorial Gym Studio C
Why: So you went to the VIBE showcase and loved it? Then be sure to stop by VIBE ReMIxed, which will feature some of the members’ own choreography and the opportunity to learn rad hip hop moves.
Who: VIBE

Recreational
Recreational

What: Nerdy Talk Trivia Night @ Hurry Back
When: Wednesday nights at 7 p.m.
Where: 2212 Elliston Place
Why: Whether you have an obsession with HQ trivia or are just looking for something new, try out trivia in real time. At Hurry Back, the stakes are high: first place wins a $50 gift card.
Who: Hurry Back

What: Book a “Viva Nash Vegas” Top Down Tour
When: Anytime
Where: Cruising through downtown Nashville
Why: Spice up your Thursday or Friday night routine with a Jeep tour through Nash Vegas. If you’re 21+, bring your own beverage and enjoy an hour and a half ride down Broadway, Music Row and 12 South.
Who:Top Down Tours

Arts
Arts

What: VU Theatre’s Orlando
When: Thursday, February 22 at 7 p.m. or Friday, February 23 at 8 p.m.
Where: Neely Auditorium
Why: Come out to support Vanderbilt students in their second to last show of the season, Sarah Ruhl’s adaptation of Orlando.
Who: Vanderbilt University Theatre

What: UNICEF Charity Concert
When: Friday, February 23 at 7 p.m. to 8:15 p.m.
Where: Sarratt Cinema
Why: For seven dollars, you can help fund UNICEF’s effort to provide rehydration tablets to children in need and see some of the best acapella Vanderbilt has to offer. The Melodores, Vandy Taal and Harmonic Notion will be performing, so grab your ticket at the Sarratt Box Office now.
Who: Vanderbilt UNICEF Campus Initiative

Health & Wellness
Health & Wellness

What: Guided Meditation
When: Thursday, February 22 at 10:15 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.
Where: Center for Student Wellbeing Meditation Room
Why: Take half an hour to find your zen in the middle of a busy week.
Who: Center for Student Wellbeing

What: Digital Detangler: Hosted by Pete Dunlap
When: Tuesday, February 20 at 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: The Wond’ry 3rd Floor
Why: If your iPhone is almost always glued to your hand, this lecture is for you. The talk will equip you with the tools to improve your digital wellness and use technology to live in the moment.
Who: Center for Student Wellbeing

Editor’s note: Source of event information is Anchor Link and Facebook

Plan your week (2/19-2/23)

Looking to try something new this week? Peruse the events below and make a point to attend something outside of your comfort zone. For more offerings, check out Anchor Link.

Educational

Educational

What: Reflections on the Presidency in the Era of Donald Trump
When: Tuesday, February 20 at 4:10 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Where: Central Library
Why: Join Thomas Schwartz, professor of History and Political Science, to reflect on the Presidency in the Trump era. If you’re feeling like a real history buff, you can also check out the new exhibition opening, “230 Years of the American Presidency.”
Who: Vanderbilt University Libraries

What: Chancellor’s Lecture Series featuring Carly Fiorina
When: Tuesday, February 20 at 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Where: Langford Auditorium
Why: Join Chancellor Zeppos and Distinguished Visiting Professor Jon Meacham as they welcome the former Hewlett-Packard CEO and 2016 Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina in the next installment of the Chancellor’s Lecture series. Fiorina will discuss her personal leadership philosophy, which values humility, empathy and diversity, along with how civic virtues are crafted in America today.
Who: Office of the Chancellor

Sports
Sports

What: Baseball vs. Presbyterian College
When: Tuesday, February 20 and Wednesday, February 21 at 4 p.m.
Where: Hawkins Field
Why: Support the Commodores as they face off against Presbyterian College.
Who: Vanderbilt Athletics

What: Watch the Olympics
When: Anytime
Where: Stream via NBC.
Why: Watch the best athletes in the world shatter records and compete for the coveted gold medal. Find out when your favorite events take place here.
Who: Team USA on the world stage

Cultural

Cultural

What: Actress, activist and Person of the Year Ashley Judd @ Vanderbilt
When: Wednesday, February 21 at 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Langford Auditorium
Why: Listen to the actress turned activist Ashley Judd comment on the #MeToo movement and the Weinstein Effect. Get excited and grab your ticket at Sarratt Box Office.
Who: Vanderbilt University Speakers Committee

What: VIBE ReMixed
When: Wednesday, February 21 at 9:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.
Where: Memorial Gym Studio C
Why: So you went to the VIBE showcase and loved it? Then be sure to stop by VIBE ReMIxed, which will feature some of the members’ own choreography and the opportunity to learn rad hip hop moves.
Who: VIBE

Recreational
Recreational

What: Nerdy Talk Trivia Night @ Hurry Back
When: Wednesday nights at 7 p.m.
Where: 2212 Elliston Place
Why: Whether you have an obsession with HQ trivia or are just looking for something new, try out trivia in real time. At Hurry Back, the stakes are high: first place wins a $50 gift card.
Who: Hurry Back

What: Book a “Viva Nash Vegas” Top Down Tour
When: Anytime
Where: Cruising through downtown Nashville
Why: Spice up your Thursday or Friday night routine with a Jeep tour through Nash Vegas. If you’re 21+, bring your own beverage and enjoy an hour and a half ride down Broadway, Music Row and 12 South.
Who:Top Down Tours

Arts
Arts

What: VU Theatre’s Orlando
When: Thursday, February 22 at 7 p.m. or Friday, February 23 at 8 p.m.
Where: Neely Auditorium
Why: Come out to support Vanderbilt students in their second to last show of the season, Sarah Ruhl’s adaptation of Orlando.
Who: Vanderbilt University Theatre

What: UNICEF Charity Concert
When: Friday, February 23 at 7 p.m. to 8:15 p.m.
Where: Sarratt Cinema
Why: For seven dollars, you can help fund UNICEF’s effort to provide rehydration tablets to children in need and see some of the best acapella Vanderbilt has to offer. The Melodores, Vandy Taal and Harmonic Notion will be performing, so grab your ticket at the Sarratt Box Office now.
Who: Vanderbilt UNICEF Campus Initiative

Health & Wellness
Health & Wellness

What: Guided Meditation
When: Thursday, February 22 at 10:15 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.
Where: Center for Student Wellbeing Meditation Room
Why: Take half an hour to find your zen in the middle of a busy week.
Who: Center for Student Wellbeing

What: Digital Detangler: Hosted by Pete Dunlap
When: Tuesday, February 20 at 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: The Wond’ry 3rd Floor
Why: If your iPhone is almost always glued to your hand, this lecture is for you. The talk will equip you with the tools to improve your digital wellness and use technology to live in the moment.
Who: Center for Student Wellbeing

Editor’s note: Source of event information is Anchor Link and Facebook

Vanderbilt downs Duke 9-1 to complete opening series win

On a beautiful Sunday afternoon, the Vanderbilt Commodores took the rubber match against the Duke Blue Devils 9-1 to win their opening series, matching their score from opening night.

Chandler Day started and threw four innings, allowing only one run and picking up six strikeouts. The Commodores received strong production from their freshmen, with Philip Clarke, Pat DeMarco, Jayson Gonzalez, and Austin Martin batting a combined 7-15 with four runs and four RBIs.

DeMarco was particularly on fire this series, recording eight hits over the three games. Pitcher Mason Hickman also turned in a strong performance in relief of Day.

Vanderbilt head coach Tim Corbin talked about the freshmen players’ composure in their first college baseball series.

“Knowing their personalities, I would say that the kids that you saw were unaffected,” he said. “They played at a high level in high school, so I didn’t really feel like they’d be intimidated, but you never really know.”

DeMarco discussed the team camaraderie and the support of the veterans.

“The juniors just embraced us as soon as we got here, and them integrating us into the team is just unbelievable,” DeMarco said

The Commodores’ pitching staff recorded shutout innings following Commodore scores after failing to do so last night, keeping Vanderbilt in the driver’s seat the whole game.

Vanderbilt struck early, as Martin led off the bottom of the first by jacking a towering shot that easily cleared the high left-field wall. Martin, a right-handed batter, received the start today in place of JJ Bleday and faced off against Blue Devils left-handed starting pitcher Mitch Stallings.

After Connor Kaiser followed up with a double into right-center, a walk by Ethan Paul and an infield single by DeMarco put the Commodores in commanding position with the bases loaded and zero outs.

However, after that, the Commodores failed to get the ball out of the infield and scored only one more run, as Stephen Scott hit a bloop one-bouncer back to the pitcher who easily cut off the runner at home, Julian Infante drew a walk after falling behind 0-2, and Philip Clarke hit a ground ball right at the second baseman for a double play.

Day threw only one perfect inning, struggling somewhat with his command, but minimized the damage to just one run in allowing just one hit with runners on base. He was also backed by strong defense from the infield.

In the top of the third, after Day gave up a one-run double, back-to-back impressive defensive plays in quick succession by the Commodores kept the Blue Devils from tying it.

With runners on second and third with one out, Gonzalez, playing in, fielded a grounder and threw a bullet to Stephen Scott who caught the ball and swung his glove to his right to place the tag on the sliding Blue Devil at the plate. After Gonzalez’s play saved a run, Ethan Paul ranged to his right to snag a liner up the middle.

Later, with the freshman right-hander Hickman pitching, Paul pulled off a leaping catch on the liner headed into right center, doubling off the runner at second easily to end the inning.

Corbin pointed to the defense supporting the pitching as one of the key factors.

“I thought the defensive plays that were made on the field for RBI-savers,” Corbin said. “Ethan Paul saved about three runs by himself.”

Hickman threw five impressive innings, pitching himself out of trouble a couple times to blank the Blue Devils and finish the game off himself.

The Tennessee native induced a 4-6-3 double play in the top of the sixth. In the seventh, he bounced back after allowing the first two runners on to record two strikeouts and a pop fly to Paul.

Vanderbilt continued their trend of jumping all over the Blue Devil bullpen, scoring off of Josh Nifong through a two-run bloop single into left by Clarke that dropped in just between the shortstop and left fielder.

The Commodores used a big sixth inning to blow the game wide open, cycling through their entire lineup. Alonzo Jones got things started with a leadoff single and a steal, his second steal of the game. A walk by Martin forced a Duke pitching change, but to no avail.

With Jones and Martin on, Kaiser bunted to the left side of the field, and Duke pitcher Bill Chillari overthrew the third baseman trying to cut down the runner at third, allowing Jones to score and the other two runners to advance.

Ethan Paul followed up by knocking a ground ball two-run single past the second baseman, playing in and unable to make the play on a tough hop. A wild pitch brought Paul to second, then DeMarco ripped a single into center, allowing Scott to collect the RBI with a ground ball single into right field when the second baseman was shaded closer to second base.

During Infante’s at-bat, yet another wild pitch by the Blue Devils allowed the runners to advance, but Infante failed to convert, hitting a high pop up to the second baseman. A ground out by Clarke pushed across one more run, and Gonzalez closed the inning with a ground out down the third-base line.

The Blue Devils went quietly after that, unable to overcome Hickman’s pitching. Corbin smiled when asked what it will mean to play against upcoming opponent Presbyterian Blue Hose, a team he coached from 1988 to 1993

“Well, they’re the opponent,” he said. “I mean, it’s just another team. But I’ve got fond memories of being there, the coach on the other team is a kid I coached. But the players play, and that’s it, they don’t know what to think. They [don’t] even know I was at Presbyterian. They might think I went to a Presbyterian church.”

The Commodores return to action at Hawkins Field on Tuesday at 4:00pm, welcoming the Presbyterian Blue Hose.

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