Engadget Daily: Yoga 3 Pro, the ‘day one patch,’ and more!

If you bought Halo: The Master Chief Collection, then you're probably still waiting for online multiplayer to be un-broken. Welcome to the age of the "day one patch." That's not all we have on deck, though -- read on for Engadget's news highlights fr...


Papercuts: Future Primitive 

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Den Is A New UK Home Automation Platform, Raising Crowd Financing

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 00.17.40


Zuck Will Do Another Public Q&A In December

zuck


NASA is 3D printing objects in space

At long last, 3D printing has conquered its final frontier: space. NASA has successfully printed its first 3D object aboard the International Space Station. It's just a tiny faceplate that identifies the printer maker (Made In Space), but it's both a...


Sony refunding PS Vita owners in FTC settlement over ads – New York Daily News

New York Daily News
Sony refunding PS Vita owners in FTC settlement over ads
New York Daily News
Sony will be giving a stocking stuffer to gamers in order to settle charges with the Federal Trade Commission. The company will be coughing up some cash for consumers who bought their Playstation Vita system before June 1, 2012 over charges the


Police Body Cameras Seen As A Fix For Ferguson-Style Killings

WASHINGTON -- Michael Brown's family did not just decry a grand jury's decision to bring no charges against the police officer who killed the 18-year-old on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri. They also offered a solution -- require all police to wear cameras on their bodies.

“While we understand that many others share our pain, we ask that you channel your frustration in ways that will make a positive change. We need to work together to fix the system that allowed this to happen," the Brown family said in a statement Monday night.

“Join with us in our campaign to ensure that every police officer working the streets in this country wears a body camera," they said.

It's an idea that has gained momentum since police Officer Darren Wilson gunned down Michael Brown Jr. in August, with witnesses offering differing accounts of what happened. Ferguson police started using the cameras shortly after the killing, and departments across the country have been trying them out, including Dallas and New York City. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) called for deploying the cameras broadly, as well.

The cameras, which can be worn on sunglasses or clipped to a shirt, have won the backing of both civil libertarians and police groups. Civil liberties advocates argue that video records prevent cops from abusing their authority, while law enforcement groups note that a person cannot falsely accuse an officer if their encounter is recorded.

A recent study commissioned by the Police Foundation, an organization devoted to law enforcement research, found that the devices dramatically lowered complaints of police abuse.

In the study, about half the police force in Rialto, California, wore cameras during patrols for a year. At the end, there were just three complaints of excessive force against the officers -- down from 28 in the previous 12 months.

"The findings suggest more than a 50 percent reduction in the total number of incidents of use-of-force compared to control-conditions, and nearly 10 times more citizens' complaints in the 12-months prior to the experiment," the report said.

Other experts, including those at the Department of Justice, have reached similar conclusions.

Use of the cameras does have downsides, however. There are no across-the-board standards for how and when the devices should be used, or for how the footage created should be used. It is possible for police to tamper with the recordings, or to simply refuse to turn on the cameras. A recent investigation by the Times-Picayune in New Orleans found cameras often were not used when they should have been.

Privacy advocates have also raised concerns, noting that storing such videos is open to potential abuse, with the possibility of potentially embarrassing encounters winding up on the Internet. The technology also may eventually be paired with other investigative tools, such as facial recognition software, opening up the chance for even greater surveillance of law-abiding citizens.

More On Ferguson From HuffPost:
Photographic Evidence Reveals | 'First Year Law Student Could Have Done Better Job' | 61 Arrested | Ferguson Smolders After Night Of Fires | Protest Locations | Americans Deeply Divided | Police Chief: 'Worse Than The Worst Night We Had In August' | What You Can Do | Darren Wilson Interview | Darren Wilson Could Still Face Consequences | Timeline | Students Protest | Photos Of Darren Wilson's Injuries Released | Shooting Witness Admitted Racism In Journal | Peaceful Responses Show The U.S. At Its Best | Reactions To Ferguson Decision | Prosecutor Gives Bizarre Press Conference | Notable Black Figures React | Jury Witness: 'By The Time I Saw His Hands In The Air, He Got Shot' | Thousands Protest Nationwide |



Dinosaur Nerds Are Already Mad At Jurassic World

Dinosaur Nerds Are Already Mad At Jurassic World

The trailer for the new movie Jurassic World was released today. It looks fun! But some science-minded folks are already pouncing on the dino-filled movie for inaccuracies.

Read more...




Sony Pictures data breach may have been an inside job: Report – Mashable

Mashable
Sony Pictures data breach may have been an inside job: Report
Mashable
After a reportedly massive data breach, Sony Pictures appears to remain at the mercy of hackers who have threatened to share "top secrets" with the public. The hack was so wide-reaching that the company's computer system has been completely shut down,


What’s Your Worst Holiday Travel Horror Story?

What's Your Worst Holiday Travel Horror Story?

We all have one of those holiday travel stories. That time you got to the airport and realized you forgot to click the buy button. That time you stepped onto the train platform and the zipper on your suitcase broke sending all of your sweaters onto the tracks. That time you got on a bus and your carsick neighbor barfed on his shoes. Life is just a John Candy movie waiting to happen.

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Neither Spotify nor musicians are making much money from streaming

Spotify may be a big name when it comes to music streaming, but the company is hardly rolling in the dough. The private company disclosed today that it took in 747 million euros (around $1.03 billion at the time) in 2013, up about 74 percent from 201...


New Yorkers, Times Have Changed: Charge Your Car or Fill It Up?

Electric vehicles are getting a lot more efficient and popular to drive in New York City.

Did you know there are more than 150 commercial electric vehicle (EV) charging stations in Manhattan, as listed in the online database PlugShare, compared with only 39 gas stations, according to a Wall Street Journal Analysis of New York Department of Finance Records. A decade ago, there were 60 gas stations, but station owners are making more money now by selling their high-value Manhattan real estate than by selling gasoline. Could this signal a new era of electric transport in the city?

Just inside the entrance to Time Warner Shops at Columbus Circle, a young couple strolling with their morning coffees stops in their tracks when they see a sexy, red sports car. The woman bends over to touch the shiny car, a brand new Tesla Model S. On the other side of the car, the man taps a touch screen that gives more information about its specifications and offers him a test drive right out of the mall's basement parking garage. As they discover that the sports car is actually an electric vehicle (EV), their eyebrows raise with delight. Another pair passing by notices their amusement and curiously stops their shopping to examine the display too. Their new interest in the spiffy car parallels a gradual transformation occurring in automobile transport in New York City.

ALL IMAGES © 2014 Maya Albanese Photography, All Rights Reserved.


2014-11-25-ClientsLookingatTeslaModel.jpg
A couple stops to check out a Tesla Motors Model S on display at Time Warner Center Shops in Manhattan.


In July of this year, 11,500 electric cars were sold in the U.S. compared to 7,500 in July 2013, a 35 percent increase year over year, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. There are purchase options on the market that appeal to a variety of consumers: 20 different all-electric models from a dozen different brands- BMW, Chevrolet, Ford, Mercedes, Mitsubishi, Toyota, Volkswagen, Fiat, Kia, Nissan, Tesla, and Smart Car- that range in price from $23,000 to $100,000+.

The increase in EV ownership is mirrored by an expansion of car charging infrastructure in NYC. One year after Governor Andrew Cuomo's announcement of ChargeNY, a program to invest in 3,000 EV charging stations across the state by 2018, the New York Power Authority (NYPA) says that 500 new stations have already been installed. In the last month, the NYPA and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) unveiled ten new charging stations in White Plains and two at Niagara Falls International Airport.

"Local and federal politicians have supported electric charging in Manhattan, and as electric vehicles become more common, the network will organically grow to support them," said Will Nicholas, a Tesla Motors spokesperson.

Tesla is a luxury EV manufacturer, founded in 2003 by billionaire entrepreneur, Elon Musk, a former co-founder of PayPal. It sells EV's online and in company-owned showrooms, a significant departure from the standard dealership sales system in the U.S. marketplace.

The Tesla Model S starts at a base price of $71,000, and with add-ons, the cars generally drive off the lot in the range of $80,000 to $100,000. A BMW five-series car could be considered comparable in size and design at a price tag of closer to $60,000, but this is an impractical comparison since the core technology is different and the costs of maintenance and re-charging are much lower in a Tesla than in a conventional car that uses gasoline.

The Internal Revenue Service offers up to $7,500 in tax credits for the purchase of an EV, and new research and development into battery technology should bring down prices in the near future. Tesla recently opened its Gigafactory in Nevada to facilitate the mass production of EV batteries and bring down their cost by at least 30 percent, which would make them competitive with mass-market automobiles.

Just below the Tesla Model S display at Time Warner Shops, people rush in and out of the basement parking structure with bags and brief cases, seldom noticing the signage designating the area as an EV charging station. Tesla has installed a series of chargers in the garage across from a ChargePoint station. ChargePoint is the world's largest network of EV charging stations and developed a mobile app to assist customers in locating 20,000+ stations. ChargePoint users can also calculate their greenhouse gas savings from driving an EV instead of a conventional car.

The attendants working for Central Parking Company watch carefully for EV drivers in case they need to clear the parking spots with chargers for them. "We see maybe two to three people come in to charge an EV each day; sometimes a BMW or a Porsche, but more often Tesla's and Smart Cars. They're fun to drive and they're quiet," explained Gelin, one of the attendants.

Gelin hears a variety of feedback from his customers who drive EV's, "I talked to one customer who drives a Smart Car, and she said it only costs her $4 to charge her battery to full." This is noteworthy savings on the average $4 per gallon spent to fill a car with gasoline in the city.

Gelin is hesitant to get an EV, "Driving back and forth in traffic in Manhattan every day, I wouldn't want to keep having to charge it. I'd rather get a hybrid, so I at least have the option of using gas."

According to Nicholas, this is a misconception. When an electric car is idling, energy is only being used for peripheral functions like heating or air conditioning, whereas conventional vehicles burn gasoline while they idle. "In some instances, an electric car can be much more efficient than an internal combustion engine in congested driving situations," says Nicholas.

Third-party applications have been developed to support the increase in EV drivers and infrastructure. In 2010, a group of self-proclaimed "electric vehicle enthusiasts" developed an app called PlugShare, an interactive map that lists over 100,000 charging stations worldwide. PlugShare does not manufacture or operate its own charging stations, but rather is a database that enables more than 120,000 EV drivers to search and filter for the stations that best fit their needs, as well as review and comment on them.

2014-11-25-ChargePointStation.jpg
ChargePoint is a network of more than 20,000 EV chargers that can be searched on the company's mobile app, or on PlugShare's app.


"What we discovered was that it's not that the infrastructure didn't exist, it's that people just didn't know it was out there," said Forrest North, PlugShare's Chief of Operations. PlugShare created the first comprehensive listing of stations and gave EV owners the option to share chargers in their own homes with each other. It has become another player in the "new sharing economy" pioneered by companies like ZipCar and AirBnb. According to North, approximately 10 percent of the plugs registered on the app are home chargers that people are sharing free-of-charge.

PlugShare just announced new collaborations with auto dealers to make sure that their salespeople and customers are aware of the growing efficiency of driving an EV in the U.S.

"Another barrier we noticed is that some dealers were not that well-informed on EV's, and in some cases, they were even discouraging them. PlugShare will be integrated into the cars' dashboard navigation systems, so EV's will come with in-dash access to the largest mapped database of charging stations," says North.

Some critics still claim that EV's are just as polluting as other cars, because electricity often comes from dirty power sources such as coal-burning plants. But, according to the latest Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) report, the percentage of Americans getting electricity from coal has decreased over the last two years. Based on utility emissions data from the Environmental Protection Agency, UCS states that 60 percent of Americans now live in areas where EV's contribute fewer greenhouse gas emissions per mile than even the most efficient hybrid cars.

"Cars not only burn gas, they pollute and are detrimental to human health. From the day a car is sold, it only gets dirtier. With an EV, you can choose any source of electricity, now and in the future," says North.

Despite the ongoing environmental debate, PlugShare data shows that there are 417 commercial EV charging stations in the greater New York City metropolitan area. While commercial infrastructure is widely available, at-home charging remains the most popular option.

"The vast majority of EV owners can charge at home or at their workplace. If they had a regular car, they'd need to go to gas station. You can't install a gas station in your home," says Forrest.

In a city that is still recovering from the shock of empty gas pumps in the chaotic aftermath of Superstorm Sandy two years ago, there are obvious advantages to being free from reliance on the island's declining gas stations.


Nexus 9 Keyboard Folio finally available from Google Play

HTC Nexus 9 Keyboard Folio official

The HTC Nexus 9 Keyboard Folio has been available for purchase from Amazon for more than a month now, but if you prefer to buy your goodies straight from Google, you can now get a Keyboard Folio from the Play store too.

The Nexus 9 Keyboard Folio is finally available for purchase from Google Play after first appearing in the store in mid-October. The accessory is priced at $129, and orders are expected to ship in 1-2 business days.

As its name suggests, the Nexus 9 Keyboard Folio will prop your Nexus 9 up at one of two angles and give you a physical keyboard to type with. When closed, it’ll protect your tablet’s 8.9-inch display. It looks like a nice accessory, and while it may seem a tad pricey at $129, it does serve double duty as a case and physical keyboard with mechanical keys. So if you want to get some work done with the Nexus 9, the Keyboard Folio may be worth looking at.

Are you going to buy the Nexus 9 Keyboard Folio?

Source:


This is what happens when you bombard a GoPro with X-ray beams

This is what happens when you bombard a GoPro with X-ray beams

Sploid reader Andrew Seltzman sent us these videos of his custom-made radiation-shielded GoPro camera going under an industrial irradiator and getting bombarded by X-rays. Reminder: Getting irradiated by a particle accelerator doesn't give you superpowers. I think.

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This Is The First Thing To Be 3D Printed In Space

printer


TuneIn brings over 100,000 radio stations to your Chromecast

Today is a great day to be a Chromecast owner. Joining Comedy Central, Nickelodeon, Sesame Street Go and others, TuneIn is now also making its mobile apps compatible with Google's budget-friendly streaming dongle. Now that TuneIn has added support fo...


How Much Do You Know About the Web? – PC Magazine

USA TODAY
How Much Do You Know About the Web?
PC Magazine
Less than a quarter of Americans know that "the Internet" and "the World Wide Web" are not the same thing. According to a Pew Research study, American Web users' understanding of online terms, famous faces, and tech history varies: While 82 percent of


This Is The Army’s New Pocket Drone

This Is The Army's New Pocket Drone

The Cargo Pocket Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance program, known also as CP-ISR, is a new nano-drone concept dreamed up by the folks at the Army's Natick Soldier Research Center. Where as most unmanned aircraft look to provide info as to what is going on over the next hill, or far over horizon, CP-ISR is all about looking around the next doorway or hedge.

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Citizens Grab Your Cameras, We Are Little Brother

little brother


The Big Picture: cooling molten metal in space

Ever wonder what hot metal would be like if it weren't bound by containers, liquids... or even gravity? You're looking at it. The European Space Agency has developed an electromagnetic levitator that the International Space Station is using to see ho...


Kyocera DuraForce taking its ruggedized body to U.S. Cellular tomorrow

Kyocera DuraForce U.S. Cellular official

After launching at AT&T earlier this month, the Kyocera DuraForce will make the jump to CDMA tomorrow.

The Kyocera DuraForce will launch at U.S. Cellular tomorrow, November 26. It’ll be available in stores and online at a price of $99 with a two-year contract or $0 down and 20 monthly payments of $20  each (total of $400). Whichever option you choose, your DuraForce will offer the following specs:

4.5-inch 1280x720 impact-resistant display 1.4GHz quad-core Snapdragon 400 processor 8-megapixel rear, 2-megapixel front cameras 16GB of storage microSD card slot 2GB of RAM 3100mAh non-removable battery Android 4.4.2 Built to Military Standard 810G to stand up to dust, shock, extreme temperatures and blowing rain Glove and Wet Touchscreen Operation Smart Sonic Receiver Technology that transmits sound directly to your eardrum to help block out external noise

While many smartphones include water and dust resistance today, most can’t really be called “rugged.” The Kyocera DuraForce does fit into that category, though, and so if you need your phone to take a licking and keep on ticking, this device is one to check out.

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Gawker CNN Was the Human Centipede of Journalism Last Night | io9 10 Standalone TV Episodes We Wish

Gawker CNN Was the Human Centipede of Journalism Last Night | io9 10 Standalone TV Episodes We Wish Would Become Spin-Off Series | Jalopnik I Think My Car Is A Money Pit And I Don't Know How Far To Take It | Kotaku Fight Between Batman and Darth Vader Ends Exactly the Way It Should | Kinja Popular Posts

Read more...




LG is already rolling out Lollipop for its best phone of the year

Just as previously teased, LG’s top Android handset of the year is receiving its official Android 5.0 Lollipop update a lot faster than initially expected, with the company having already announced that the Korean version of the G3 is ready to be upgraded to Google’s latest Android version. FROM EARLIER: How to add Adobe Flash support to Android 5.0 Lollipop LG said that the update will be ...


Robots: Now Even Their Golf Game is Better (VIDEO)

The University of Arkansas – Fort Smith (UAFS) prides itself on preparing students for good-paying jobs so it’s little wonder that the school has become the first in the state to offer a robotics certification program. read more


BlackBerry to Pay iPhone Users Up to $550 to Switch to Passport – eWeek

Montreal Gazette
BlackBerry to Pay iPhone Users Up to $550 to Switch to Passport
eWeek
The deal, which is good from Dec. 1 through Feb. 13, 2015, offers iPhone owners up to $550 to trade their smartphones in for a BlackBerry Passport phone. BlackBerry has launched a rebate offer of up to $550 to iPhone owners who are willing to trade their


30 Years of Amazing Criterion Collection Art Packed Into a Single Book

30 Years of Amazing Criterion Collection Art Packed Into a Single Book

Today the Criterion Collection released a 306-page book full of the designs it has commissioned since 1984, including covers, supplemental art, concept art, and more. Criterion Designs is a coffee table book we can all believe in.

Read more...




The Structure Dilemma

Are you a Diamond or Graphite?

Clue? You could be either. It's all a matter of organisation.

The world of high growth tech start-ups typically revolves around speed and deft execution. Every day is an ongoing race to do things bigger and better; a day can blur into a week which blurs into a month, the only constant factor being change: product shipping, new team members joining (11 for us the other week!) and new offices opening. A break might consist of a meeting conducted over a brisk walk around the block, twice if you need to discuss something in detail. Juxtaposed against this permanent state of acceleration, Stream, with its no fixed schedule and anarchic approach, seemed both mysterious and alluring.

I am not the typical start-up employee. I have adopted the start-up mentality as a way of life but, in the beginning, its fluctuating dynamics were foreign to me. I joined Percolate from Sotheby's, the esteemed auction house and the oldest company traded on the NYSE. Naturally, it is a place deeply entrenched in tradition, and it is a very well-oiled machine. I worked in the Watches and Clocks department, where I spent my days with objects that were often several hundred years old, ranging from complex Patek Philippe watches similar to this one just sold last week, to vintage Rolexes, to utterly charming 19th century automatons, like this Ethiopian Caterpillar.

When I arrived at Percolate, it was clear from the beginning that not only was rapid change a way of life for us internally, the media landscape was also changing dramatically. As I spent day after day sitting with clients and agency partners listening to their challenges in this evolving new world, everybody acutely felt the challenges that social and mobile had introduced to their marketing efforts in some way, shape or form. All of us in the industry are well aware that these factors have extraordinary, and difficult, implications for marketing, largely because the operational infrastructure that exists today does not support either this type of scale or pace of production and distribution.

At Sotheby's, when I was confronted with a problem, I had all the best restorers, herpetologists and ornithologists on speed dial to fix any problems that arose, no matter how rare or obscure. If I needed to identify a single feather on a 200 year old object, I knew who to call. Unfortunately, no such Rolodex existed in this brave new world. To be clear, there were many experts in marketing, in digital, in branding, and so on, but there was no roster of tried and true experts, in the sense that we were all contending with a very new landscape. We were watching the merging of two previously separate disciplines: marketing and technology, and the challenges we encountered simply hadn't existed before.

My most memorable and fruitful conversations with clients and agency partners in this context always revolved around the resulting new challenges; they often lingered on difficult questions with no clear answers, and they were always stimulating and thought provoking. I often wished that I could spend the entirety of these meetings only discussing these issues. They seemed to warrant much more time than simply the first 15 minutes of a meeting. To think of these challenges as merely context seemed to be a massive understatement to me.

I wasn't sure what to expect of Stream, but I knew in advance that there was something irresistible about its dialectical format, especially given it would take place in the birthplace of dialectics: Greece. My inner nerd was completely thrilled just hearing about this. Of course, I was also very curious having seen the attendee list, which drew from across a wide span of industries and roles. However, industry conferences often give me reason to hesitate, as I find those worthwhile attending are few and far between. Too often, keynote addresses can drag on as speakers on the conference circuit rehash presentations given multiple times at other conferences, and conversations are harried with everybody hurrying to exchange as many business cards as possible.

Set aside the fact that there are no keynote presentations at Stream, and conventional powerpoints are in fact banned - what I quickly came to realize about Stream, additionally, was that it broke down a series of barriers, making it a very different conference experience, namely because:

Conversations are off the record
For better or worse, you are confined to a geographically limited space for an extended period of time
Hierarchy is deconstructed with anybody hosting a discussion on any topic

Moreover, the environment is designed for chemistry. The existence of only one coffee bar means that chance encounters are highly likely in the afternoon when jet lag kicks in. Communal dining means that somebody (anybody) could sit down next to you during lunch or dinner. These often yielded the best and most unexpected of conversations.

The attendees of Stream, of course, are vital to this chemistry. I read an interesting blurb tucked into the back pages of the FT last week which referenced the research of Yale sociologist Professor Nicholas Christakis, who studies how people interact when they come together in groups. He uses an analogy to compare graphite to diamonds, thinking of humans as metaphorical carbon atoms, who can come together to form either substance, depending on how they are arranged.

This insight cast light onto what I found to be the most remarkable aspect of Stream - that somehow, the Stream team had assembled a group of people, who when they came together, formed not merely a common substance like graphite, but something much rarer and brilliant, akin to a diamond. My initial inclinations around that attendee list were right on target; some of us may never have crossed paths outside of Stream, and most of us would never have wound up in the same place all at once, otherwise.

There were a number of conversations about talent at Stream, but what wasn't addressed was that while attracting and retaining talent when it comes to individuals is certainly a tough challenge, constructing groups and building teams to collaborate and work effectively together is perhaps even more difficult, and I would argue, even more important. As marketing merges with technology, it becomes increasingly important to collaborate across these disciplines that were once separate.

The constant change which defines our industry today also requires constant creativity to deal with its ever evolving set of challenges. For the mind to contend with the unknown, it can benefit from the removal of parameters. What if there were no established way of doing things? What if you could discuss anything? What if you could create anything? I think of our annual hackdays at Percolate where the business and product teams come together to dream up new ideas and products, temporarily removed from any firm roadmap or client requests, and the unexpected, brilliant ideas that always emerge from it. Stream, similarly, was a unique environment, devoid for rules, for precisely this type of open ended discussion so important to navigating the difficult challenges we face today as an industry. I attribute its success to the chemistry and environment so thoughtfully constructed by the Stream team, not only in terms of format, but in terms of the group dynamics that would take shape over the weekend - it was no small feat.

Thank you, Martin and Yossi, for inviting me. I hope you'll invite me again!


Sony walks away from FIFA and World Cup sponsorship – New York Daily News

New York Daily News
Sony walks away from FIFA and World Cup sponsorship
New York Daily News
Sony has ditched FIFA, becoming the second major sponsor this month to walk away from the troubled governing body of international soccer. Sony Corporation's decision to let its contract expire at the end of 2014 comes three weeks after Emirates airline


45 Gifts To Buy For Your Favorite Popular Science Editor In 2014

We like to geek out over all kinds of things here at Popular Science. From retro-cool, to cutting-edge, to future-tech there's nothing like a good gizmo to get our gears



Screen rotation missing in Android 5.0? Here’s where it’s hidden

After upgrading the Moto X 2014 to Android 5.0 I noticed that not all of my apps were rotating when holding the screen in landscape mode. No problem, I'll just tap the setting to fix it. Wait.... where ...


iPad Slump Signals ‘Massive Deceleration’ in Tablet Shipments – PC Magazine

The Australian Financial Review
iPad Slump Signals 'Massive Deceleration' in Tablet Shipments
PC Magazine
Tablet shipments will increase just 7.2 percent this year compared to 52.5 percent growth last year, IDC said. 0shares. How We Test Tablets


Sony to refund some customers after misleading PS Vita ads

According to the Federal Trade Commission, Sony deceived consumers by falsely advertising the PlayStation Vita's "game-changing" features when the console launched in the US. And, perhaps in an effort to stay out of court, the electronics company has...


The First 3D Printer in Space 3D-Printed Its First Object

The First 3D Printer in Space 3D-Printed Its First Object

While you were probably wishing Thanksgiving break would start already, the astronauts on the International Space Station made history. They 3D-printed a spare part for the 3D printer. In space.

Read more...




T-Mobile teases ‘massive Cyber Monday special’

T-Mobile magenta logo

We already know that T-Mobile’s got several Black Friday deals on offer, including a special Stateside International Talk add-on and a free Alcatel OneTouch Pop 7 tablet. However, today T-Mo revealed that it’s got something even bigger planned for Cyber Monday.

In a blog post running down all of T-Mobile’s Black Friday deals, CMO Mike Sievert has teased that T-Mo has “a massive Cyber Monday special” planned. T-Mobile doesn’t offer any details on what the offer might be, but it does say that it’ll share more details on Sunday at 8:00 pm PST and that the deal itself will go live at 12:01 am PST on December 1.

T-Mobile massive Cyber Monday special teaser

So what might T-Mobile have planned? We don’t know, and neither do our pals at TmoNews. The good news is that we don’t have long to wait until all is revealed. And when it is, you can be sure that we’ll tell you all about it.

What do you think T-Mobile’s “massive Cyber Monday special” might be?

T-Mobile massive Cyber Monday special teaserSource:


Ferguson Verdict Prompts World Patent Marketing To Discuss Inventions That Will Change Police Work Forever

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. -- via PRWEB - In response to the protests in Ferguson, Missouri and the national debate surrounding the killing of a young man by the police, World Patent Marketing, the world's fastest ...


A More Efficient Solar Panel Can Be Made With Old Blu-Ray Discs 

A More Efficient Solar Panel Can Be Made With Old Blu-Ray Discs       </div>
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Hollywood Comes Back To Silicon Valley With A New SyFy Reality TV Show

Hollywood 500 Highway1


What feds need to know about Regin malware – FedScoop

Popular Mechanics
What feds need to know about Regin malware
FedScoop
A diagram from Kaspersky Lab shows multiple stages of the Regin malware exploit. (Credit: Kaspersky). Cybersecurity professionals should be paying close attention to Web browsing and email services in the wake of a highly sophisticated malware


How long does the phablet trend have left?

Looking back at the size trends in mobile is kind of a funny looking roller coaster. You had huge phones in the 80’s and 90’s, then heading into the early 2000’s you had a race for the smallest phone. Remember this little cutie patootie?

It's so small!

That's the Pantech C300. A phone that size worked out pretty well for people who just wanted to make calls, text, or take tiny pictures. Of course, heading further into the latter half of the 2000’s you’ll eventually run into this beauty:

... which changed just about everything. Yes, the Apple iPhone was, comparatively speaking, huge when compared to how hard companies had been working over the past several years to make small phones the next “big” thing, but a phone with a 3.5-inch screen wasn’t impossible to grasp. In fact, according to former Apple CEO Steve Jobs, a 3.5-inch screen was the “perfect” size for one-handed use - so while the phone may have been big in comparison, it was still useable with one hand, which was still important. At least at the time.

Jobs, back in 2010, went even further to say that “no one’s going to buy” big phones, particularly aiming the statement towards Samsung, who was steadily starting to increase screen size little by little, taking advantage of a feature that Apple never seemingly wanted to integrate. In fact, many Android manufacturers were taking advantage of Apple's confidence in its 3.5-inch screen size. HTC, Motorola, Sony, LG, and Samsung were all making flagship Android devices with bigger screen sizes than Apple’s iPhone, and it was paying off rather well for them.

This is a trend that continues even 4 years later. Smartphone screens have become so large that a new term has been coined for the behemoth smartphones, “phablets”, which is appropriate given that the size of these phones are somewhere in between smartphone and tablet-sized.

The first phablet to really garner any attention (and ridicule) was the Samsung Galaxy Note. Many had speculated that the Note was so large that it could never make it past its niche market, which was another wrong prediction. The Galaxy Note, now in its fourth generation, is one of the most highly anticipated yearly releases in the smartphone industry. Perhaps even more surprising is that the Galaxy Note is no longer the device with the largest screen size anymore. For that, you can look at the 7-inch Huawei MediaPad, the 6.44-inch Sony Xperia Z Ultra, the 6.3-inch Samsung Galaxy Mega, the 6.1-inch Huawei Ascend Mate 2, or even the 6-inch Nokia Lumia 1520. Each of these phones have a screen that measure larger than the 5.7-inch display on the Samsung Galaxy Note 4.

And with smartphones having officially crossed the line with a 7-inch screen, which is tablet territory, I have to wonder just how much longer phablets will trend before the train turns around.

As you can see, for the past several years manufacturers have been selling the “bigger is better” slogan by releasing such large smartphones - even Apple eventually changed its mind. But phones can only get so large before people really start to see them as ridiculous. Even some of the larger models, such as the Samsung Galaxy Mega, aren’t exactly top sellers (which might have something to do with the lackluster specs as well, but I feel like the extra large screen size is also a key factor). It just seems like companies have run out of room. Nobody can brag that they have the “biggest screen size” in a phone anymore - really, anything beyond a 7-inch screen is a tablet with phone capabilities, and it’s all been done before.

Because of this, I feel that change is imminent; I feel that soon it’s going to be all about who can fit the best specs and most features in the smallest shell - and still make for a good smartphone.

Obviously, we’re not going to be able to replicate something like the Pantech C300. That phone was made before web-browsing, social media, apps, etc. were features in a phone. However, I wouldn’t be surprised to see a phone with a 4-inch display, or even slightly smaller, with powerful specs sometime in the future. I think it’s going to be a race back down to the bottom for a lot of manufacturers. If you can’t claim to be the biggest anymore, what can you claim?

To be the smallest, of course.

It's so small!It's so big!Source:


Google delays death sentence for old-style Chrome plug-ins – PCWorld

CNET
Google delays death sentence for old-style Chrome plug-ins
PCWorld
Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. More by Gregg Keizer. Google on Monday gave traditional Google plug-ins a stay of execution and instead outlined a three-step


Kitchen gadgets to make Thanksgiving cooking easier

Depending on whether you like to cook, Thanksgiving can either be a day to dread in the kitchen or a day to relish. I looked at some gadgets that can help make your meal prep smoother with Meaghan Murphy from Good Housekeeping.


How Much Food Can You Actually Eat This Thanksgiving?

How Much Food Can You Actually Eat This Thanksgiving?

Let's talk total Thanksgiving tonnage here. How much Butterball-plus-fixins can you reasonably jam down your yaw this Thursday? Basically: You could eat a lot more if it wasn't for all the saliva you have to make to break it down.

Read more...




Sound off: Show us your used and abused phones!

That sad, broken handset is what one friend had to use while waiting for his new one to arrive. We know that you too, have felt his pain and are bound to have some similar photos floating around. Whether your phone was dropped into a pool of hydroflu...


Technology, Communication and Religion

Many a pundit has suggested that the Internet has stirred -- or is a symptom of -- the greatest technological revolution since the dawn of the industrial age, or even the invention of the printing press in 1448. In fact, they could well be understating the impact of technological advances in all areas of our life, including our spiritual lives.

Religious communities and all of the relationships therein are being reshaped with remarkable rapidity. Technology is creating greater symmetry in relationships between clergy and congregants and encouraging greater institutional transparency. Many of these changes are positive, while others, such as distractions within interpersonal interactions and the search for meaning, may be causing challenges.

No matter one's feelings about the interaction of religion and technology, religion is being pushed, cajoled, uplifted, and profoundly changed by the technological advances of our time and merits greater study.

The two of us had the opportunity to join with the Reverend Paul Raushenbush, Executive Editor of Huffington Post Religion to more deeply examine the ways that changes in communication technology, and particularly the Internet, are affecting religion -- from the vantage point of someone at the cutting edge in his presence within both spheres.

In a time of change, what remains constant? Where does authority come from in a decentralized world? What are the implications of the "always-on" nature of public speech today? How has technology created new ways to pray?

This video, and many similar reflections, are part of the Sinai and Synapses Discussion Forum, which is currently exploring the question, "Are We Using Technology or Is Technology Using Us?"

We look forward to your reactions and to continue the conversation about these ever-unfolding changes.

VIDEOS

Part 1: Who has authority?



Part 2: New kinds of relationships




Part 3: What does public speech look like now?



Part 4: New ways to pray



Full conversation:


TC Droidcast Episode 28: Android Wear Weary, Go For GRID Gaming

droidcast-banner-28


HTC RE Camera will have its price slashed to $99 this weekend

HTC RE Camera colors

We’ve seen a lot of Black Friday deals so far that include smartphones, audio accessories and wearables. Now we can add a camera to that list as well.

HTC has announced that its new RE Camera will have its price tag cut in half this weekend. Normally priced at $199, the RE Camera will be available for $99 from 9:00 pm PT on November 27/12:00 am ET on November 28 through 9:00 pm PT on December 1/12:00 am ET on December 2. That price will be available on HTC’s site as well as through Best Buy, AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon.

If you absolutely can’t wait until later this week to buy a RE Camera, the HTC Hot Deals site is currently selling the device for $199 with a free suction mount and bar mount.

While HTC’s RE Camera is a bit of a dicey proposition at $199, especially with strong competition from the likes of GoPro and others. At just $99, the RE Camera is much more interesting for folks that want a simple little action camera to document their adventures. 

It’s also worth noting that HTC’s past Hot Deals have sold out pretty quickly. And while the discounted RE Camera will be available through several more retailers, you probably don’t want to delay your purchase for too long if you’re interested.

Are any of you going to snag a $99 HTC RE Camera this weekend?

Source:


Amazon’s New Local Handyman Service Looks Super Useful

Amazon's New Local Handyman Service Looks Super Useful

We've known for a while now that Amazon wanted to start offering local services. Now, the store for everything is selling TV-mounting services ahead of all the TV sales on Black Friday. And you know what? That sounds like a pretty useful addition to the Amazon family.

Read more...




Vine now lets you know when your favorite users post clips

If you're a Vine aficionado, you probably have a short list of people whose six-second videos you want to see right away -- you may want to marvel at a Zach King illusion or scratch your head at one of Will Sasso's lemon clips, for instance. Well, yo...


Americans Don’t Know A Lot About Internet History Or Policy

The Pew Research Center quizzed Americans on their knowledge of technology and the web, and the results were pretty middling.



You Can Almost Finally Buy That Keyboard-Shaped Waffle Maker

You Can Almost Finally Buy That Keyboard-Shaped Waffle Maker

It first graced the Gizmodo front page way back in 2007 , but finally, seven years after we all first really wanted one for ourselves, that keyboard-shaped waffle maker could really be yours. Assuming, of course, its creator's $50,000 Kickstarter campaign reaches its funding goal—so close, but yet still so far.

Read more...




Senate giving old computers to 5 Arkansas schools

DEER — A handful of computers no longer used at the U.S. Senate are going to five rural schools in Arkansas.


Lewis Baltz, Photographer of America’s Changing Landscape, Has Died

Over the course of the mid to late twentieth century, photographers set out to document the rapidly shifting makeup of America's expanse. Lewis Baltz was one of the foremost artists to capture the landscape and architecture in an amazingly austere, yet moving way. He passed away this week at age 69 of a long-term illness.

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These Are Some Of The Best Deals On Headphones This Black Friday

Headphones are the perfect gift for any tech lover this holiday season, and there are a whole lot of great deals on popular models right now. Typically, headphone prices range from reasonable to outrageous. But between Thanksgiving sales, Black Friday and Cyber Monday, you should be able to get a good deal on a new pair.

To help you out, we've chosen a few of the best sales of the year. All of the sales below are available online unless stated otherwise.

skullcandy
Skullcandy In-Ear Headphones
Sale price: $8.88
Original price: $18.88
Store: Walmart
Sale time: Starting Thursday 8 P.M., but unclear for how long.

beats by dr dre beats solo
Beats by Dr. Dre Beats Solo HD On-Ear Headphones
Sale price: $80
Original price: $152.99
Store: Best Buy
Sale time: Starting Thursday 5 P.M., but unclear for how long.

bose
Bose QuietComfort 3 Acoustic Noise Canceling headphones
Sale price: $199.95
Original price: $349.95
Store: Bose
Sale time: Now through Dec. 1, 2014, or while supplies last.

bose
Bose MIE2 mobile headset
Sale price: $79.95
Original price: $129.95
Store: Bose
Sale time: Now through Dec. 1, or while supplies last.

beats studio wireless
Beats Studio Wireless Over-Ear Headphone
Sale price: $275
Original price: $341.95
Store: Amazon
Sale time: Already on sale, but unclear for how long.

sony
Sony - Extra Bass Over-the-Ear Bluetooth Headphones
Sale price: $99
Original price: $199.99
Store: BestBuy
Sale time: Already on sale, but unclear for how long.


Senate giving old computers to Arkansas schools

DEER, Ark. (AP) - A handful of computers no longer used at the U.S. Senate are going to five rural schools in Arkansas. The office of Sen. John Boozman takes part in the chamber's Computers for Schools program. Computers no longer used in the Senate are donated to ...


Grabyo Secures $2M From Celeb Sports Stars For Rights-Friendly Social Video

Gareth with Thierry


Dropbox’s Carousel will offer to delete local photos you’ve backed up

The photo backup features in mobile apps like Dropbox's Carousel and Google+ are there partly to take the load off of your phone -- you don't have to keep every shot close at hand. Wouldn't it be nice if the software got rid of local images when they...


Against Acceleration

7851259884_1a6388e52d_k


First images of the beautiful new Lego Birds set

First images of the beautiful new Lego Birds set

On November 7th, Lego announced that they would be producing a set based on Tom Poulsom's Bird project submission to Lego Ideas. Lego did an interview with the creator of Birds (21301) where we get a peek at the set and box art.

Read more...




The Secret Lives of LinkedIn Users

I have over 1,250 LinkedIn connections. Most people would consider me an active LinkedIn user. Still, I don't have the faintest idea what I'm doing on LinkedIn. In search of answers, I surveyed hundreds of fellow users and asked them to describe what they do on LinkedIn. What astonished me was the distinction between their front stage and back stage behavior.

"What do you say you do on LinkedIn?"

1. Build my professional network.
2. Document my work experiences.
3. Showcase my technical capabilities.
4. Promote my personal brand.
5. Discover new career opportunities.
6. Share my expertise.

"What do you actually do on LinkedIn?"

1. Admire my own profile.
2. Debut a headshot that looks like my younger, better-looking sibling.
3. Edit my headline and summary ad nauseam.
4. Examine my credentials from the POV of my client/hiring manager.
5. Discover who my top stalkers are.
6. Neutralize their creepiness by stalking them back.
7. View a hottie's profile in the hopes that he or she reciprocates.
8. Connect with attractive people for no other reason than they're fun to stare at.
9. Request to connect with my crush from college who I never met in person.
10. Develop a sense of intimacy with Sheryl Sandberg, Mark Cuban, and other famous businesspeople who I'm following.
11. Rub my accomplishments unapologetically in the faces of those who doubted me.
12. Endorse borderline-strangers whose skills I know nothing about, with the expectation of receiving endorsements in exchange.

Let's connect on LinkedIn!


The Government Wants to Delete Years of CIA and DHS Emails

The Government Wants to Delete Years of CIA and DHS Emails

On September 17, the National Archives published a seemingly routine announcement in the Federal Registrar. Couched in language about preserving records of value is a line about the destruction of records and a list of federal agencies. The CIA is one of these agencies, and its emails about waterboarding could be some of those records.

Read more...




Nokia Z Launcher for Android review

Nokia's Z Launcher for Android is a fresh approach to the Android launcher scene, which is so full of products that look and work the same. Instead of the usual multiple home screens make-up adopted by most other developers, 
Nokia's Z Launcher has two screens: Home and Apps. 

In the home screen you can scribble letters to search for anything you want, whether that be apps or contacts on your device, or content on the web. As you use it, it learns from you and adapts the content it shows on your home screen. And its handwriting recognition is superb. I've loved using it so far. 

Download Nokia Z Launcher Beta for Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.nokia.z

Video Title:


1 Out of Every 9 Bridges in the US Is Structurally Deficient

1 Out of Every 9 Bridges in the US Is Structurally Deficient

There are about 630,000 bridges in the United States, ranging from impressive new structural creations like Margaret Hunt Hill bridge in Dallas to deteriorating slabs of concrete in desperate need repair. It's that last growing group of bridges, ports, and highways that represent the slowing decaying infrastructure that was once the best in the world.

Read more...




Comcast wants customers to track and rate its technicians

When it comes to offering great customer service, Comcast's reputation on the matter is far from being healthy. Every now and then, the company gets put on the map for making its subscribers go through rather tedious experiences -- to get an idea, ju...


Back to the Future’s Hoverboards Were Originally Way Bigger

Back to the Future's Hoverboards Were Originally Way Bigger

The hoverboard from Back to the Future: Part II is one of the most iconic artifacts of 20th century futurism. But surprisingly, the hovering toys were originally envisioned to be much larger than what made it on screen. That's according to John Bell, the visual effects art director on the classic 1989 film.

Read more...




What does 3D printing need? More cowbell You can now 3D-print your …



Here are all the most annoying Android 5.0 Lollipop bugs – and how to fix them

The gradual rollout of Android 5.0 Lollipop has been an exciting one, but as with any major software upgrade, there are a few bugs that will need quashing in the coming weeks and months. We’ve covered a few of these bugs recently, including the accidental removal of Silent Mode and the unfortunate persistence of recent apps to stay open after being swiped away. DON’T MISS: Android Lollipop might ...


The tablet boom is over – Computerworld

Computerworld
The tablet boom is over
Computerworld
It's time to kiss the tablet boom goodbye, as shipments of the once-dominant Apple iPad decline amid a worldwide slowdown for the devices. Shipments of all tablets worldwide will increase by just 7.2 percent this year, compared to 52.5 percent in 2013,


Police Body Cameras Are a Good Start, But Not a Cure-All

Police Body Cameras Are a Good Start, But Not a Cure-All

Last night, Michael Brown's family renewed the call for all police officers to wear body cameras that record their interactions with people. This is smart, but like every other tool we give the police, cameras will only work the way they're intended to if the cops don't abuse them.

Read more...




Cult hit ‘Dark Souls II’ is coming to Playstation 4 and Xbox One – Entertainment Weekly

Entertainment Weekly
Cult hit 'Dark Souls II' is coming to Playstation 4 and Xbox One
Entertainment Weekly
It's easy to pass on From Software's Souls franchise, mostly because there's one thing that dominates all conversation about it: They're stupid, hard games. But that's not really fair—they're not so much hard as they are dense; every encounter is thrilling, every


Here’s Why Online Shopping Is The Way To Conquer Black Friday

This week marks the joyous (or not-so-joyous) occasion known as Black Friday. There are so many deals we want to nab, our heads are spinning -- and we haven't even set the Thanksgiving table yet.

The good news? Staying home in your turkey coma is a better way to get Black Friday deals than schlepping to a store. MUCH better.

"I do not recommend anyone going to a physical store on Black Friday," says Mark LoCastro of DealNews, a site that analyzes and confirms thousands of retail offers per day. "There's no need to. The vast majority of in-store deals will be online in some shape or form."

Wait, how is shopping online the way to win Black Friday? A few reasons:

1. "Doorbusters" exist in limited quantities.

Those big deals you hear about prior to Black Friday may not be all that plentiful -- it's likely that only shoppers who camp out for days or show up extra-early will get them.

Best Buy's 50-inch Panasonic TV is the deal that has shoppers hyped this year, LoCastro says. But, "if you're not one of the first twenty people in line, you're not going to get it." Indeed, a rep at our local Best Buy said she was "not allowed to disclose" how many of the TVs were in stock -- and we have a feeling this spells bad news.

2. There are comparable -- if not better -- deals online.

While Best Buy's big deal may be limited on the shelves, LoCastro points out, some of its other top deals -- like a 55-inch Samsung for $900 off -- are available online as early as RIGHT NOW.

Similar principles apply to many of the other housewares we're coveting: Retail expert Brad Wilson estimates that Kohl's stellar KitchenAid mixer deal will be even better online than in stores, as he expects the Kohl's website to offer an extra coupon for the mixer sometime on Thursday or Friday. And while crowds will mob Target for their Dyson vacuum doorbuster, you'll find a Hoover vacuum for 50 percent off, just sitting on their website. We call that a win.

3. You can hit tons of stores instead of just one.

When you line up for a doorbuster, Wilson points out, you're subjected to the few top deals at just one store. Online, the deals run far and deep -- and nothing is off-limits.

The one store you should hit, in fact, doesn't even exist in brick and mortar: Amazon is offering a series of lightning deals all week, in which customers can score huge discounts on electronics, clothing and toys as often as every 10 minutes. By setting price alerts for the item you want and using comparison sites to figure out where it's cheapest, you'll be a much more savvier shopper online.

4. And Thanksgiving is the new Black Friday, anyway.

Times have changed -- as the experts see it, Black Friday is no longer Black Friday. "The best deals are on Thanksgiving now," Wilson says. And since we aren't proponents of spending family holidays at the mall, we'll stay home and click our way to deals early on Turkey Day morning. Then it's on to the good stuff(ing)!


No One Needs a One-Button Hashtag Key But I Want It Anyway

No One Needs a One-Button Hashtag Key But I Want It Anyway

Are you sick and tired of hitting two keys before each and every hashtag? Have you lost hours at work hunting down the # on your keyboard? Has your pinky been injured from awkward shifting positions? No? Me neither. But isn't this little hashtag keyboard cuuuuuuuute?

Read more...




5 Time Traveling Timelapses

We don't yet have time travel, but we can travel through time quickly through the power of timelapse photography. Here are your submissions to this week's timelapse Shooting Challenge .

Read more...




Amazon now connects you with local contractors

Looks as if the list of things that Amazon doesn't sell just got that little bit shorter after the company started connecting people with local contractors. Customers in a handful of trial cities, including NYC and Seattle, can now use an Angie's Lis...


Top 10 Streaming Video Trends You Can Expect in 2015

2014-11-24-StreamingMediaWest2014.png
Serial entrepreneur and mobile consultant Hannah Bree Hanson and I were in attendance at the Streaming Media West Conference last week in Huntington Beach, CA. The event featured a veritable who's-who of industry leaders including Verizon, Limelight Networks, Wowza, Skype, and NFL Now, Tivi, and Ramp.

Here's the top streaming video trends you can expect to see in 2015:

1. Better Personalization:

Video content providers are becoming obsessed with "meta-data". It's a buzzword becoming more popular and is driving the personalization and search industry. As NFL Now head Cory Mummford shared in his keynote speech, all 32 clubs are streamlining meta-data for the user.

Cory Mummery of @NFL keynote at #smwest. How NFL Now automates #metadata for highlight vids. Plays have an ID, and Meta is map'd to video

— Al Falaschi (@DigitalMediaAl) November 18, 2014


This breaks down to specifics - videos are being better tagged so each viewer is getting exactly what they want in their video feed so they aren't seeing junk. A Cowboys fan who has Peyton Manning and Arian Foster on his Fantasy team is only getting Cowboys highlights along with Manning and Foster, and in order of importance. Users will get what they want, when they want, in one linear feed.

2. Higher Quality:

With more broadcasters switching to 4k and Skype integrating its new product


Solving the “STEM Paradox” With the Global STEM Alliance

Earlier this year, U.S. News & World Report released its STEM Index of the United States. It revealed that student aptitude for and interest in science, technology, engineering and math has been essentially flat for more than a decade, at the same time that the need for STEM skills continues to grow.

This situation is being replicated throughout the world. The New York Academy of Sciences (NYAS) recently released its own report, in which it characterizes the international STEM crisis as a "STEM paradox." It's not that there aren't enough STEM graduates - the problem is that there aren't enough work-ready graduates. Other challenges include a "brain drain" from developing countries and a lack of women in STEM fields, which makes it impossible for employers to fill all their STEM job openings.

The NYAS report also outlines how partnerships between governments, corporations and institutions can solve problems in the STEM workforce pipeline. In response to these needs and opportunities, the Global STEM Alliance was created last year. It's an international collaboration of public and private entities that harnesses the collective mindshare of corporations, local and national governments, nonprofits, students and STEM leaders. This Alliance will bring together STEM professionals of different ages and cultures to develop often-missing foundational skills and adapt to specific environments. The Alliance will engage and prepare the next generation for careers that encourage global economic development and the innovation needed to address and overcome today's biggest challenges.

The goal of the Global STEM Alliance is to create an environment where governments, businesses, nonprofits and schools all work collaboratively to encourage students' interest in STEM and train them for the jobs of today - and tomorrow. The three critical elements of a strong STEM ecosystem are:

Soft and hard skills: A combination of classroom learning with real-world experiences deployed throughout the educational system to give students both the technical and professional interpersonal skills they need to succeed;
Mentoring to impart vision: A culture of mentorship that empowers all involved to understand the importance of and opportunities that lie within STEM; and
Incentivizing innovation: Government incentives that encourage companies to invest in innovation and scientific research to create promising job opportunities for STEM graduates.

Immediate and cooperative action is required in order to fill STEM gaps. The Alliance has committed to mentoring 1,000,000 aspiring STEM leaders in over 100 countries by 2020, creating STEM leaders in developing nations and promoting economic development worldwide. The Alliance already has among its members corporate partners like Cisco and government partners like Malaysia, Benin and the city of Barcelona.

The global STEM crisis is bigger than any one entity to conquer. Our highly connective world poses many challenges but also affords tremendous opportunities. It creates both the need for more STEM professionals and the means to meet that need via international collaboration and innovation. Educational institutions, organizations and governments do not have the knowledge and financial resources required on their own, which is why the Global STEM Alliance came into being. It brings together these three spheres of influence to prepare the employees of today and tomorrow for the jobs that will continue to propel our world forward on its trajectory of greater economic development and connectedness.

Additional information on the Global STEM Alliance is available here.

To see Wim Elfrink, Executive Vice President, Industry Solutions & Chief Globalization Officer, discuss the initiative, click here.


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