Report: Facebook and Uber Want You to Call a Ride From Messenger

Report: Facebook and Uber Want You to Call a Ride From Messenger

According to a report from Recode, Mark Zuckerberg met with Uber CEO Travis Kalanick to discuss putting an Uber integration within Facebook's Messenger app. Someday soon we could order a car in between sending our Facebook friends weird cat stickers.

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Syfy App Turns Your Entire Living Room Into Sharknado Central

Got the Syfy Sync app for iPhone/iPad and some Hue bulbs ? Faboo! Tune into Syfy next Wednesday to watch Sharknado and Sharknado 2: The Sharkening The Second One as never before.

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Five Best Smartphone Car Mounts

Five Best Smartphone Car Mounts

You nominated many dashboards full of smartphone car mounts, and we've dug through to come up with the five most popular. Now it's time to vote by starring your favorite.

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No Security: Hope X Is (Not So) Decadent and Depraved — Day 2

This is Day 2 of my journal shooting my history on computer hacking at HOPE X Conference at the Hotel Pennsylvania July 18-20, 2014. You can read day 1 here.

Day 2

10:00am- First thing this morning I snorted one ritalin, drank one and a half cups of black coffee and I'm eating a red apple right now at the hotel. I slept like a rock after HOPE X day 1. My sinuses shut down during the night from yesterday's heavy drug intake, but a lovely nurse sorted me out at 5am. I was asked to be on HOPE's radio show today, which is a great honor. They are also looking for Phiber Optik. Maybe we can go on together. That would be fun...

I'm set up at the same spot at HOPE with my crew waiting for our first interview with Tiffany Rad. Tiffany is a high powered Washington attorney who is also a computer security analyst. I am slightly concerned about my questions, which I wrote on the fly at 9pm last night. What I find so hard about documentary filmmaking is doing all the research before every interview. I wonder if all of the people I am filming expect me to be fully versed on their body of work. I should make an attempt to be. I don't know anyone who does this much research.

My business partner John Torrani and Adam Torkel are setting up the lights and camera. Its almost showtime and I find their sober presence soothing.

12:01 pm-Finished interviewing Tiffany Rad, she was brilliant. Tiffany explained computer security from a very accessible and learned perspective, she studied it much in the way she studied viruses and bacteriology. There were definitely some excellent insights. We quickly flagged down Cheshire Catalyst for an interview. He was game and was a lot of fun. I can tell he has a few pre-prepared statements but more or less had some funny insights. He's one of these guys who caught on to phone phreaking early and stayed the course. His story runs from TAP to 2600 etc. I just ran into my pal Dave Buchwald (who designed miles of art for 2600 The Hacker Quarterly among other things) before the talk. We some loose plans to get together but he had to bail early.
Gotta go- keynote by Daniel Ellsberg and Edward Snowden. Mad hype.

1:25pm- I did my last dilaudid. Waiting for the keynote to begin. My crew and I got into the main room where the speakers are. This is really supremely lucky as there are quite literally people waiting outside the hotel trying to get in. All of this excitement has a lot of people on edge. John texted me from his location on the side of the ball room, where he has been regulated to film with the rest of the press. I'm nonplussed at this point. Thank god for Xanax. 2600 mastermind Eric Corley just started the intro. This is going to be great.

2:30pm- Everything running late. Ellsberg was fantastic. It was a stellar speech, the only black dot on an otherwise perfect experience were the two idiots sitting behind me who were voicing their mundane opinions. Loudly. I had to tell them to shut up and everyone in the immediate vicinity looked thankful that I spoke up. Ellsberg is a brilliant speaker. His words flow, his story is riveting. I'm sure you will be able to find his hour long inspiring and succinct speech online, and I encourage everyone to watch it. After the talk I saw Ellsberg coming out of the bathroom with Cheshire Catalyst. Next up is Ed Snowden in conversation with Ellsberg. I'm going to film this on my iphone now and post it to my NO SEC column in its entirety....

4:10pm- Nevermind it was streamed. You've seen it by the time you read this. I had a little bit of time with Ellsberg for an interview following the talk. He was gracious and patient despite having been through quite a lot today. I'm a bit star struck around him. Growing up with a father who was an art director at Hustler, you develop a great appreciation for what Ellsberg did with the Pentagon papers. Although my film is about hacking and not whistleblowing, we need a respected voice like his to address that subject.

5:00pm- Everything was pushed back an hour. We did a five minute pitch in the lightning talks. My producer John Torrani and I tag teamed it. I thought it was really good. Got some laughs.

7:00pm- I show up at Radio Stetler for my scheduled Radio Interview. Nobody is there. Oh well... tomorrow may work.

8:38pm- I've had enough. We pack up....we are all totally burnt. The room we have been in is so unpleasant, aesthetically speaking, and windowless, we are all suffering from a lack of oxygen and an overdose of stimulation.


UK Supermarket To Use Food Waste To Power Itself

Where does all the leftover food go when the grocery store closes at the end of the day? Maybe it's repurposed somehow or thrown out, but what if it could help a supermarket become energy independent? A Sainsbury's supermarket in the United Kingdom will soon power itself with leftover food waste and disconnect from the National Grid.

Sainsbury's is partnering with Biffa, one of the U.K.'s largest waste management companies, to make this possible. Sainsbury's trucks its food waste from all over the U.K. to Biffa's plant in Staffordshire. Biffa then converts it into biogas, and this biogas is then burned to meet the energy needs of a location in the town of Cannock.

"Sainsbury's sends absolutely no waste to landfill and we’re always looking for new ways to reuse and recycle," said Sainsbury's' head of sustainability Paul Crewe in a press release. "We’re delighted to be the first business ever to make use of this linkup technology, allowing our Cannock store to be powered entirely by our food waste."

Not all of Sainsbury's' food becomes biogas. To ensure no waste goes to landfills, Sainsbury's also donates food that's safe to eat to its charitable partners to feed the underprivileged, or to the Knowley safari park to feed the animals.

Biogas is a renewable fuel, created when bacteria feast on organic matter in a large tank in the absence of oxygen. This is called anaerobic digestion, and Sainsbury's is the process' biggest user in the U.K. In a statement, the company says they generate "enough energy to power 2,500 homes each year."

Biogas is composed mostly of methane, which is a potent greenhouse gas if released uncombusted. Burning the fuel releases carbon dioxide, but unlike natural gas, coal or oil, which release carbon that was once sequestered underground, biogas is created from organic sources already a part of the carbon cycle and is carbon-neutral.

Biogas power generation can be a solution for remote areas in need of energy. Wind and solar can be intermittent depending on the weather, but biogas is more reliable. Plus, anaerobic digestion doesn't just have to depend on food waste. Manure and other agricultural wastes can be converted to biogas as well.

Check out the infographic below to see how the Sainsbury's biogas power plan works.
sainsburys


Obamacare Website Getting So Much Traffic It’s Surprising Experts

This story was co-published with NPR's "Shots" blog.

For months, journalists and politicians fixated on the number of people signing up for health insurance through the federal exchange created as part of the Affordable Care Act. It turned out that more than 5 million people signed up using Healthcare.gov by April 19, the end of the open-enrollment period.

But perhaps more surprising is that, according to federal data released Wednesday to ProPublica, there have been nearly 1 million transactions on the exchange since then. People are allowed to sign up and switch plans after certain life events, such as job changes, moves, the birth of a baby, marriages and divorces.

The volume of these transactions was a jolt even for those who have watched the rollout of the ACA most closely.

"That's higher than I would have expected," said Larry Levitt, senior vice president for special initiatives at the Kaiser Family Foundation. "There are a lot of people who qualify for special enrollment, but my assumption has been that few of them would actually sign up."

The impact of the new numbers isn't clear because the Obama administration has not released details of how many consumers failed to pay their premiums and thus were dropped by their health plans. All told, between the federal exchange and 14 state exchanges, more than 8 million people signed up for coverage. A big question is whether new members will offset attrition.

ProPublica requested data on the number of daily enrollment transactions on the federal exchange last year under the Freedom of Information Act because the Obama administration had declined to release this information, a key barometer of the exchange's performance, to the public. The administration also has not put out any data on the exchange's activity since the open enrollment period ended.

The data shows so-called "834" transactions, which insurance companies and the government use to enroll new members, change a member's enrollment status, or disenroll members. The data covers the 36 states using the federal exchange, which include Texas, Florida, Illinois, Georgia and Michigan.

When Healthcare.gov rolled out last fall, insurance companies complained that the information in the 834s was replete with errors, creating a crisis at the back-end of the system.

Between April 20 and July 15, the federal government reported sending 960,000 "834" transactions to insurance companies (each report can cover more than one person in the same family). That includes 153,940 for the rest of April, 317,964 in May, 338,017 in June and 150,728 in the first 15 days of July. The daily rate has been fairly stable over this period.

It was not immediately clear how many of the records involved plan changes or cancellations and how many were for new enrollments.

An insurance industry official estimated that less than half of the transactions are new enrollments. The rest are changes: When an existing member makes a change to his or her policy, two 834s are created 2014 one terminating the old plan and one opening the new one.

Charles Gaba, who runs the website acasignups.net that tracks enrollment numbers, estimates that between 6,000 and 7,000 people have signed up for coverage each day on the federal exchange after the official enrollment period ended. Gaba's predictions were remarkably accurate during the open enrollment period.

"That doesn't account for attrition. That doesn't mean that they paid," Gaba said. "That's been based on limited data from a half dozen of the smaller exchanges, extrapolated out nationally."

The federal data obtained by ProPublica confirm some other facts about the rollout of Healthcare.gov, which was hobbled initially by technical problems. The slowest day was Oct. 18, when no 834 transactions were sent. That was followed by Oct. 1, the day the website launched, when a grand total of six records were sent to insurers.

By contrast, the busiest day was March 31, the official end of open enrollment, when 202,626 "834" reports were sent to insurers. The entire last week in March was busy.

About 86 percent of those who signed up for coverage on the federal exchange were eligible to receive government subsidies to help lower their monthly premiums. Those subsidies are being challenged by lawsuits in federal court contending they aren't allowed by the Affordable Care Act.

Two federal appeals courts came to conflicting decisions Tuesday on the permissibility of the subsidies (one said yes; the other no). They will remain in effect as the cases proceed in the courts, the Obama administration said.

The next time that the general public can sign up for coverage through the exchanges is from November 15 to February 15, 2015.

Click here to download the data (Excel or CSV) released to ProPublica under the Freedom of Information Act.

Read our previous coverage of the Affordable Care Act and share your story.



The All-American Expo That Invaded Cold War Russia

The All-American Expo That Invaded Cold War Russia

Over the course of six weeks during the height of the Cold War, almost three million Soviets visited an exhibition that celebrated America. American kitchens, American art, American cars, and most especially American capitalism. The American National Exhibition in Moscow was a full-court press to convince the Soviet people of American superiority.

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Jimmy Kimmel Convinces People That An Old Casio Is Apple’s iWatch

Screen Shot 2014-07-24 at 11.54.13 AM


NASA Made An Underground Water Map To See Just How Bad The Drought Is

NASA Made An Underground Water Map To See Just How Bad The Drought Is

On this dry July day, news about the drought that's engulfed most of the western United States continues to get worse. But how do we know how extensive the current megadrought is? We actually can measure from the sky, but not in the way you think.

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Google faces data watchdogs over ‘right to be forgotten’ – BBC News

BBC News
Google faces data watchdogs over 'right to be forgotten'
BBC News
Google has met data regulators from across the European Union to discuss the implications of the recent "right to be forgotten" ruling. An EU court ruled in May that links to "irrelevant" and outdated data should be erased from searches on request, leading to


Family Asked To Deboard Plane After Dad Sends Tweet Criticizing Gate Agent

A Minnesota dad isn't exactly feeling the "LUV" after he and his two kids were removed from a Southwest Airlines flight last weekend following confusion over the airlines' boarding process for children.

Duff Watson was traveling with his two kids, ages 6 and 9, from Denver to Minneapolis on Sunday afternoon, when he says the agent at the gate prevented him from boarding early with his children. As an "A-List" passenger, Watson told CBS Minnesota he's entitled to priority boarding. The gate agent let Watson through but wouldn't let his children board the plane with him.

“I am not trying to game the system,” Watson told ABC News in an interview Wednesday. “I’m not going to leave my kids alone to board. That doesn’t make sense.”

With no other option, Watson says he and his family waited to board the plane later, with Watson promising to alert Southwest customer service to the agent's conduct.

“I thought she was very rude and wanted to complain to customer service, so I asked her: ‘Can I get your last name?’” he recalled to ABC News. “She told me: ‘You don’t need my last name for anything,’... [and] I told her: ‘Real nice way to treat an A-list member.’”

As promised, he shot off a complaint to Southwest's Twitter account, which, Watson told KARE 11, read in all caps, "RUDEST AGENT IN DENVER. KIMBERLY S. GATE C39. NOT HAPPY @SWA.”

After sending the tweet, the family, which had since boarded the flight, was called out via the plane's loudspeaker and asked to gather their belongings and leave the aircraft.

The agent he'd disagreed with earlier had called them off the plane, says Watson, because she felt "threatened because he used her name on social media." He says he was told "that unless he deleted his post, she was calling the cops and the family would not be allowed back on the plane."

Watson says he ultimately deleted the tweet as the agent looked on, and the family was allowed back onto the flight with his children, who by that point he says were in tears over the incident.

In a statement published Thursday morning, Southwest Airlines apologized for the incident and said they've discussed the matter with Watson: Southwest Airlines appreciates and is active in social media, and it is not our intent to stifle Customer feedback. Social media is a very valuable avenue for engaging with our Customers. On Sunday, July 20, a Southwest Airlines Employee and Customer were having a conversation that escalated about the airline's family boarding procedures. The Customer was briefly removed from flight #2347 from Denver to Minneapolis/St. Paul to resolve the conversation outside of the aircraft and away from the other Passengers. Our decision was not based solely on a Customer's tweet. Following a successful resolution, the Customer and his family were able to continue on the flight to Minneapolis. We are thoroughly investigating the situation. We have reached out to the Customer and offered vouchers as a gesture of goodwill.

WATCH the full CBS Minnesota segment, below:



Lawn Love Wants To Bring The Whole “Software Eating The World” Thing To Your Own Backyard

lawn love 2


Fixed Raises $1.2 Million For A Mobile App That Fights Your Parking Tickets For You

fixed


Watch Jimmy Kimmel Trick People Into Thinking a $20 Casio Is the iWatch

Apple's iWatch is a wonderful amazing revolutionary product that does not exist. But it feels like it's just around the corner, doesn't it? Like it's hiding in plain sight. Which is why it's hilarious to watch Jimmy Kimmel dupe people into thinking a dummy Casio is Apple's rumored smartwatch.

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Microsoft Brings OneNote To Amazon’s Android App Store

When Microsoft said that it wanted to take its products and services to other platforms, it appears that the company meant it: Today the software firm brought OneNote, its EverNote competitor, to Amazon’s Android App Store. So, if you have a Kindle Fire or a Fire phone, you can now take OneNote on the road with you. Microsoft recently made OneNote free everywhere. Before, it had a mixed… Read More


Microsoft explains quantum computing in a way we can all understand

Quantum computing -- it's a term we're hearing more and more, as companies such as D-Wave build their own early versions of super-machines. Microsoft, naturally, is investing considerable resources in the field as well; its Station Q research lab in...


Audra McDonald And Jimmy Fallon Sing About Life’s Biggest Questions In Another Yahoo! Answers

Life is full of tough questions like, "How do I become the life of the party?" and "What do I do if I think an ice cube is stuck in my throat?"

Fortunately, Tony winner Audra McDonald is back to sing more Yahoo! Answers with Jimmy Fallon and "The Good Wife's" Josh Charles. These lounge singers have such silky smooth advice, you almost won't believe it's real.

Like seriously.

"The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon" airs weeknights at 11:35 p.m. ET on NBC.




This Little Stick Tells You If Your Drink Was Drugged

Plenty of women can relate to the fear that comes along with putting a drink down at a crowded party or bar: Did someone spike this cocktail? Was I just roofied?

Now, there's a gadget -- a little stick -- designed to ease that date-rape drug anxiety. It's called pd.id, or the "personal drink ID."

Here's how it works: Stick the pocket-sized gizmo into your drink, and it will scan for color, conductivity and temperature. It then takes that information and compares it to a database of drinks it knows by connecting to an app on your phone.

If it finds that the drink is red wine and nothing more, a green light flashes. But if it spots a common date-rape drug like Ambien or Rohypnol, the red light lets you know to pour it out and consult the smartphone app, which will tell you what was in it.

pdid
The pd.id in action.

While the high-tech industry has been mired with its own gender-balance problems, Wilson said he has been encouraged by the support he has received from his techie colleagues.

"A lot of men don't understand the issue of sexual assault," founder David Wilson told the Huffington Post. "But men are now becoming more aware."

Wilson, a former IT consultant living in Toronto, began working on pd.id three years ago. Since then he has launched a campaign on Indiegogo to raise $100,000 to fund his project. Even if his project fails to meet its fundraising goal, he said, it will at least have raised awareness of the issue. So far, it's raised about $12,000.

Statistics about the prevalence of date-rape drugs are difficult to come by, but in 2005 the U.S. Department of Justice found 4 percent of sexual assault victims had been drugged. (And drugged or not, nearly one in five women have been raped or experienced an attempted rape, according to a 2011 survey done by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

Trying not to oversell his device, Wilson called pd.id a "warning system" like the song-identifying Shazam app. Similar to how Shazam might have trouble finding a match in a crowded bar, "noise" in a drink -- like dishwasher soap residue -- could fudge the results.

But Wilson said this technology is already used by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. And even when the stick can't pin down exactly what's in the drink, the red light will still flash to let you know to think twice before taking a sip.


Musician Traverses Iowa, Recreates ‘Blue Danube’ Waltz With The Sounds Of Wind

In a new mini-documentary by Siemens, musician Will Bates harnesses the sounds of wind power in Iowa to recreate Strauss' "Blue Danube." Partnered with the company, Bates sought to enhance the beauty of turbines by combining their modern aesthetic with classical music. And to prove that Iowa's beauty is more than just corn, he embarked across the Hawkeye State to assemble the iconic waltz.

Armed with microphones and PVC pipes, Bates experimented with wind in his studio in New York before heading out to the Midwest. "We had first envisioned creating an original piece but felt the scale and style of the Blue Danube waltz was well suited due to its recognizable sound and the quality of the tones," said Bates in a Q&A with Siemens. "It is haunting when translated."

In 2013, Siemens was contracted to build the United States' largest on-shore wind power installation in southeast Iowa, to be completed by the end of 2015. The 448 new wind turbines will supply 317,000 households with clean power and create over 1,000 new jobs. Throughout the United States, Siemens has installed enough wind turbines to power approximately 3 million households.

Despite the recession, Iowa's economy is growing, according to the Mid-America Business Conditions Index from Creighton University. In June, however, Iowa's economy slowed slightly, allowing Minnesota to reach the top spot among the Midwestern states.

"We filmed just after a very hard winter –- rough on the farmers like the one who’s field we filmed and recorded on," Bates said. "It made the work feel all the more important as we featured how the local economy is impacted by this wind power and the local manufacturing for the turbines behind it. I think this greater message helped make the project something unique and unusual –- bigger than just the music itself."

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, between 2011 and 2012, wind generation in Iowa rose by 31 percent. And among all 50 states, Iowa ranks first in portion of energy coming from wind generation.

Listen to the full version of Bates' "Blue Danube" below:



Sprint partners with Google on mobile apps for business – TabTimes

Tech Times
Sprint partners with Google on mobile apps for business
TabTimes
Mobile carrier Sprint has found a big name partner to boost its standing as a business provider, search giant Google. Starting in August, Sprint announced it will deliver a comprehensive, “mobile centric” offering of Google Apps that will include a full array of


Celebrate Chromecast’s Birthday With Free Google Play Music Streaming – PC Magazine

Forbes
Celebrate Chromecast's Birthday With Free Google Play Music Streaming
PC Magazine
Today is the Chromecast's first birthday; one year of casting YouTube videos, Netflix movies, Pandora playlists, and more to your TV. According to Google, Chromecast users have streamed content to their devices more than 400 million times. Those who


A Display-Tweaking Algorithm Could Let You Ditch Glasses and Contacts

A Display-Tweaking Algorithm Could Let You Ditch Glasses and Contacts

I spend too much of my waking life staring at screens. If you're reading this, you probably do, too. So instead of putting things on or in front of our imperfect eyeballs to correct and protect them, how about rethinking the screens we're staring at? Researchers at Berkeley, MIT, and Microsoft have developed a prototype that could one day make glasses or contacts obsolete—at least when you're looking at your phone or computer.

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Gadgets to Keep Your Home Safe While You're Away

Traveling is supposed to be about relaxation, but for some, leaving home inspires nightmares of flooded basements, forgotten stove burners quietly incinerating your house, or raucous house parties thrown by your ne'er-do-well offspring.


Comic-Con bans Google Glass from super secret screenings

While you might be able to don an Oculus Rift to pilot a Pacific Rim jaeger, Comic-Con isn't as accepting of another piece of (not so) popular headgear. As TechHive reports, event organizers have begun mirroring actions taken by some US and UK movie...


Whoop! Hadoop coop swoop: Hortonworks bags $50m from HP – Register

GigaOM
Whoop! Hadoop coop swoop: Hortonworks bags $50m from HP
Register
Hadoop has become a strategic battleground for three of the world's most influential technology companies, judging by HP's $50m investment into Hadoop company Hortonworks. The injection, which was announced on Thursday, follows Google Capital – the


Whoop! Hadoop coop swoop: Hortonworks bags $50m from HP – Register

GigaOM
Whoop! Hadoop coop swoop: Hortonworks bags $50m from HP
Register
Hadoop has become a strategic battleground for three of the world's most influential technology companies, judging by HP's $50m investment into Hadoop company Hortonworks. The injection, which was announced on Thursday, follows Google Capital – the


Using goTenna’s Pocket Antenna to Send Texts Without Cell Service

Using goTenna's Pocket Antenna to Send Texts Without Cell Service

Inspired by the downed cell towers and utility outages of Hurricane Sandy, the folks at goTenna wanted a way to keep smartphones connected even when the grid fails. What they came up with is a pocket-sized handheld antenna that lets users send texts and location info without cell service. And we got to see a prototype in action.

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Dear Progressives, We’re Not Doing It Right

When I was a kid, I fell in love with musicals. All the other boys could quote baseball player stats and football scores all day long, but it wasn't my thing. I, on the other hand, reveled in discovering the breadth of Patti LuPone's career or learning every lyric from Weird Romance, an Off-Broadway flop from 1992 featuring some amazing performances. This was the little world I owned -- no one knew more about it than I did.

In high school and college, I started discovering other people who had the same thrill over hearing the name "Chita Rivera" as I did. Finally I was discovering my community. People who were unabashedly obsessed with Broadway became the folks I could identify with and I wanted to spend my time with (as annoying as that may sound to the non-musical theatre afficianado).

Netroots Nation is one of a few annual convenings of people who work in progressive campaigns, organizations and advocacy. The conference that brings thousands of progressives together prides itself on being on the cutting edge, whether it be the introduction of new technology, discussions about the past, presence and future of the movement, or hosting speeches where politicians compete to be the most progressive of all.

Over the years, Netroots has led by example, making sure that sessions submitted have diverse panelists and trainers, including a "Transgender Ettiquette" statement in the program and the panels themselves represent an extraordinary array of important issues affecting the entire progressive community. But something's not trickling down.

A common criticism of progressives (mostly from other progressives) is that we're all talk. Terms like "radical inclusivity," "privilege" and "intersectionality" dominate our discussions, but like the hypocrisy of some religious folks who don't practice what they preach, many of us fail at incorporating these memes into our daily work.

Last week saw several examples where we failed to live up to the progressive values we hold as ideals for our movement.

Sharing the conference hotel with us was a science fiction convention called DetConOne. As I moonlight as a voice actor on Pokémon, I'm extraordinarily familiar with the costumes, the discussions and the feel of conventions like that one. One thing that strikes me about the sci-fi/fantasy fan community is that acceptance and pride are unspoken community agreements. They are unapologetically nerdy, inspiringly proud of how they look in a costume, and most importantly -- always kind to one another -- to a degree that I've never experienced in any other community I've been a part of.

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As the week progressed, I frequently caught some Netroots attendees rolling their eyes or saying things that were less-than-accepting of the attendees from the other conference. While I did catch this a handful of times, there were several who were quite willing to admit they too, were big fans of the genre -- a few even purchased registrations to the other con.

The final night of the conferences, there were several hotel parties going on at the same time. Two full floors of parties from the Sci-fi fans and a handful of events for Netroots attendees. For each of the Netroots parties, there was a barrier for entry. Folks were being denied admittance from different events for a variety of reasons -- some people were invited and others clearly were not. At one party, I was told directly that I wasn't supposed to be there because I didn't have a special bracelet.

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Naturally, I didn't want to be where I wasn't wanted, so I wandered down to the Sci-Fi con's parties and was welcomed in the door of all of them -- free drinks and food and even a dance party complete with a proud, tattooed, transgender woman DJing and a room full of pirates, wookies, lefty organizers, dreamers and dream defenders dancing the night away.

When moments like this and others were mentioned on Twitter and Facebook, the first response was a defensive one. "It wasn't me..." "I would never snicker at someone else..." or "I'm always welcoming and affirming of everyone!" I'm sorry, but that's no longer enough if we are going to continue to march under the progressive banner. Progress doesn't mean sitting and waiting for others to come to the table. Progress is showing others, by example, that they are wanted and respected at the table. We claim to be the place where everyone is welcome, but if you really think about it -- that's not what we're living. It may be what we're saying, but it's not how we act.

And it wasn't just about the parties and it never has been. At nearly every gathering of progressives, the most common feedback is frequently that it wasn't diverse enough, not inclusive enough or that people felt alienated and alone because of their identity. Our first response to this can never be "Well, everyone was invited -- it's their own fault for not showing up." If we take a second to actually be progressive and think about why this may be such a common problem, we can then begin to make it better.

We have an opportunity to take a step back and start living the things we talk about. We get so very stuck in the game playing, the climbing and the "fighting for others," that we stop understanding anything about those "others." We need to change that.

When a science fiction convention is more affirming, less body-shaming, more welcoming and less sneering than a conference with 3,000 plus "progressives," we're doing something wrong. I loved Netroots Nation in Detroit this year, but we need to do better as a community. I don't know about you, but I want to be part of a movement where the Muppet fans, the Star Wars lovers, and yes, even that little boy belting out "Don't Cry for Me, Argentina" are all encouraged to sit at the table.


Happy Birthday, Chandra X-Ray Observatory

Four new images of supernova remnants celebrate the telescope's 15 years of awesome discoveries G292.0+1.8 G292.0+1.8 lacks a catchy name, but it's one of only three known oxygen-rich supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Milky Way galaxy. This image shows the dance of elements in G292-point-yadda's debris cloud, including oxygen in yellow and orange, magnesium in green, and silicon and sulfur in blue. Astrophysicists believe that SNRs containing abundant oxygen are fundamental sources of heavy elements, the matter needed to form every living or inanimate thing in the galaxy. About 4.8 kiloparsecs or 15-20,000 light years from Earth, G292.0+01.8 is also remarkable for the off-center pulsar wind nebula within it: the remains of the original star that exploded, and revealed to Chandra by its X-ray emissions.


GM issues 6 more safety recalls – Fox News

CNNMoney
GM issues 6 more safety recalls
Fox News
File-This Feb. 18, 2007, file photo shows an unsold 2006 Grand Prix sedan sitting outside a General Motors dealership in Boulder, Colo. General Motors safety crisis worsened on Monday, June 30, 2014, when the automaker added 8.2 million vehicles to its


Instagram Leaks What Looks A Lot Like A Snapchat Clone

Instagram may be following in the footsteps of its parent company, Facebook, by developing a Snapchat clone -- and prematurely leaking it, too.

Last night, some Android users reported seeing a notification in their Instagram feed announcing Bolt, a “one tap photo messaging app," The Verge reported Thursday.

The notification, which apparently linked out to a nonexistent Google Play page, was taken down soon thereafter.

A Facebook representative declined to comment, and Instagram did not immediately return a request for comment. But several screenshots of the notification have been posted to Twitter:

Bolt, le "Snapchat" d'Instagram ? : http://t.co/Rk33yJ6PqF ... pic.twitter.com/u398eBWv7z

— FrAndroid (@twandroid) July 24, 2014


Did anyone else get this weird bolt notification on their Instagram earlier? pic.twitter.com/SBrLH7qTTK

— areli i (@yo_areli) July 24, 2014


What is this, @instagram? #bolt pic.twitter.com/orbOIDU215

— Richard Groves (@englishinvader) July 24, 2014


This is the second time in recent months that Facebook has accidentally released a Snapchat copycat ahead of schedule. The company debuted its own version, Slingshot, last month, but not before accidentally uploading it to the App Store several days before its official launch.

Bolt could be Instagram’s own Snapchat clone, perhaps because adoption of the Snapchat-like feature Instagram Direct -- which lets people send private photo messages to other users -- is not meeting expectations.

But The Verge wondered whether Bolt could wind up looking more like Taptalk, a new photo chat app that’s apparently faster than Snapchat. That would make some sense, considering TechCrunch reported last month that Facebook may be building a Taptalk copycat of its own, a rumor that has not yet been borne out.


Google celebrates Chromecast’s birthday with free All Access pass

It's hard to believe that it's been a year single Google's streaming dongle arrived on the backs of TVs, bringing easy streaming chops to the masses. As a proper celebration, the folks in Mountain View are thanking both current and new Chromecasters...


The Smart Key Chain Will Store Your Files, Check Your Email, And Find Your Keys

Screenshot 2014-07-24 13.08.37


AT&T 4G LTE service goes live in several new markets

AT&T 4G LTE logo

We’re very nearly at the end of the work week, and AT&T has decided to make its customers’ weekends even better by rolling out 4G LTE service to several new markets.

AT&T has flipped its 4G LTE switch in new states like Minnesota, Michigan, California and Pennsylvania. The full list of markets that’ve been announced so far looks like this:

Clearlake, Calif. Connersville, Ind. Escanaba, Mich. Mankato and North Mankato, Minn. Mansfield, Ohio Van Wert, Ohio Huntingdon, Pa. Johnstown, Pa.

More 4G LTE goodness is always good, especially as AT&T continues to light up smaller markets around the country. Are you located in one of AT&T’s new 4G LTE locales? If so, tell me how the network is treating you!

Via AT&T



IBM & California Partner On Private Cloud – InformationWeek

USA TODAY
IBM & California Partner On Private Cloud
InformationWeek
CalCloud, the State of California's private cloud managed by IBM, aims to streamline services for 400 state and local government agencies. Government agencies aren't the first group that come to mind as cloud computing trailblazers, but the State of


IBM & California Partner On Private Cloud – InformationWeek

USA TODAY
IBM & California Partner On Private Cloud
InformationWeek
CalCloud, the State of California's private cloud managed by IBM, aims to streamline services for 400 state and local government agencies. Government agencies aren't the first group that come to mind as cloud computing trailblazers, but the State of


Instagram’s “Bolt” Leak Could Be A New Facebook App Or An App Install Ad Test

bolt


Thrifty, Yet Nifty – Wired

IBNLive
Thrifty, Yet Nifty
Wired
Very accessible price for 4G LTE networking and a fresh OS. Windows Phone updated to include Cortana, better notifications, and tighter integration with Microsoft cloud services. Colorful interchangeable covers, solid body. Support for up to 128GB of storage


Apple Makes OS X Yosemite Beta Download Available To Testers

today


Square Now Works With IFTTT

sqwer


New Sleep Gadget Tracks Pretty Much Everything In Your Bedroom

There are already a lot of ways to track sleep, from fitness trackers to sensors to phone apps. But if you want to get really serious about this stuff, you have to start tracking your bedroom, too.

That's the idea behind a new product called Sense, which tracks your sleep and your sleeping environment. The Sense system takes sleep analytics to a new level, combining information on your sleep patterns with what's going on around you. It can even wake you up at the perfect moment.

Though you can't buy it yet, a Kickstarter for the high-tech sleep system has already raised more than $396,000, with almost a month left to go. The project has already more than tripled its initial goal of $100,000.

According to a video on the Sense Kickstarter page, the sleep tracker has three parts. There's a smartphone app, a device that sits on your nightstand (the "Sense") and a cute little clip that goes on your pillow (the "Sleep Pill"). This thing is serious.

sense kickstarter

The Sense tracks light, temperature, humidity and air particles like dust and pollen, and the Sleep Pill tracks how you move through the night with an accelerometer and gyroscope. Both devices send the data to your smartphone, showing you key info like when your deepest sleep occurred and what interrupted your sleep during the night.

sense kickstarter

If you find out that the garbage truck interrupted your sleep at 6 a.m., but you didn't even notice, maybe you'll invest in earplugs. If it was the sun, get an eye mask. Learning what's hurting your slumber is key to deeper and better sleep.

Finally, the system wakes you up at the best time for your body. "If you want to be up by 9:30 but you're already half-awake at 9:15, then your alarm should know to go off then, not wait for you to fall deeper into sleep," James Proud, the CEO and founder of Hello Inc., the company producing Sense, says in the video on Kickstarter.

When you wake up, you are presented with a sleep score of 0 to 100. Noises, light and other disturbances make your score go down. You're shooting for a perfect 100.

It might not be the best idea to start grading your sleep, since sleeping should be stress-free, not competitive. Still, it would be nice to have a handle on what exactly is going on when you're not awake. Maybe just don't get too obsessed.

sense kickstarter

Sense's founder, Proud, is one of the inaugural Thiel Fellows, a group of 20 teens each given $100,000 by the billionaire entrepreneur and investor Peter Thiel to drop out of college and work on their own project. He's already sold one company, an online platform for concerts.

Americans are notoriously bad about not prioritizing sleep, a simple act that's incredibly important to health and happiness. There's more riding on sleep than you may know. Sleep loss has been linked with weight gain, arguments in relationships, and anxiety. And if you're not ready to spend for a fancy sleep gadget, just making sure you're carving out time for rest is a good first step.



New French law could force Uber drivers to return home after every fare

If you're at a party and the host stops offering you drinks, it's a subtle hint that it's probably time to make tracks. Similarly, France is making it very clear that it isn't too keen on ride-sharing apps like Uber, to the point where its senate is...


Xperia Z2 vs. iPhone 5s vs. Lumia 930 vs. LG G3 – Camera Battle

Cam pits four of the best cameras on the market against each other, highlighting the benefits of each. Overviewing specs, user interface, ease of use, picture and video quality in a video that should help you make your decision between them if camera performance is a big deal to you in your buying choices.



Sonic Cannons Are Going to Wreck East Coast Ecology in Search of Oil

Sonic Cannons Are Going to Wreck East Coast Ecology in Search of Oil

The Obama administration's record on environmental responsibility took a huge hit last Friday when the Feds approved not only energy exploration off the Eastern seaboard for the first time in 40 years, but also the use of sonic cannons, which have been linked to immense disruptions of oceanic life. Who cares about the survival of the world's 500 remaining Atlantic right whales; Virginia and the Carolinas need more fossil fuels to burn!

Read more...




Sprint ‘Take the Edge Off’ event scheduled for August 19

Sprint Take the Edge Off event invitation

Mark you calendars, mobile fans! Sprint has announced that it’s holding an event titled “Take the Edge Off” on August 19. Unsurprisingly, Sprint hasn’t said exactly what it’s got planned for the shindig.

So what might Dan Hesse and Co. be planning? The focus on the word “edge” could be a hint at some network-related news, as EDGE is a 2G network technology, though it’s GSM while Sprint is a CDMA carrier. Android Central notes that the word “ranger” was used for the title of the image, which may or may not have something to do with Sprint’s plans.

The good news is that August 19 is less than a month away, so it won’t be long before all is revealed. What do you think Sprint will announce at this upcoming event?

Via Android Central



Are YOU spoiling your child with gadgets? Parents spend almost £400 a YEAR on phones for five-year-olds

The survey, from Düsseldorf-based energy firm E.ON polled 2,000 British adults about their tech spending habits.


Technology Gives me a Headache

I didn't want a cell phone. I was perfectly content with my landline telephone and felt no need to reach out, touch or be touched by anyone. I loved the quiet periods that came with driving, and wandering through shops and parks, alone and non-communicative. Now, if I don't answer my phone in the middle of dinner at a restaurant, callers worry and later reprimand me for having turned it off.

Technology frustrates and baffles me. When I reluctantly caved in and bought a cell phone, I did it so I could call for help if I was lost or mugged. I hadn't bargained for a built-in camera, a recording device, access to the Internet, email and texting capabilities, games, a calculator and dozens of other alleged amenities that I never use, don't need and don't understand. I resent being prompted by a robot who doesn't react when I scream obscenities at it. My greatest technological accomplishment this year was learning how to turn up my cell phone's volume.

I watched a 12-year-old kid text messaging on his cell phone. His fingers raced over the key pad nearly as fast as Kim Kardashian can remove her clothes. I thought if he could do it I could too, but he'd typed and sent a 10-word message while I was still searching for the "I" in "Hi."

My teenage granddaughter sent me an email from her cell phone during History class in school. As if that wasn't bad enough, she used text messaging abbreviations. She might as well have typed it in Swahili. To make a point, I responded using a form of shorthand I'd learned in an Adult Education course. She answered saying she hadn't understood a word, which made me feel good.

Computers drive me crazy, too. I miss my Underwood typewriter. The only time I worried about it crashing was when it sat too close to the edge of my desk. I could type obscene letters and bomb threats if I felt like it and not worry about incriminating evidence being stored in its innards. It never caught a virus or sent me messages on how to enlarge my manhood.

I do admit, though, that the Internet is wonderful for research. As a full blown Dyslexic, it's far easier for me to navigate than to use the Dewey Decimal system at the library, where my repeated number reversals always had me searching for books in the wrong section.

Before I learned how to navigate the World Wide Web, I didn't know I needed a six-foot long bronze sculpture that's now in my front yard. I didn't realize my home could be enhanced if I bought that 20-inch high silver table that I may have to hang from the ceiling because it won't fit any place else. I didn't realize the ease of ordering all kinds of makeup, miracle diet pills, miracle wrinkle creams, books, shoes and exotic foods. I never enjoyed the friendship of so many hundreds of people I probably wouldn't like if I ever actually met them.

Before the Internet, my credit card statements were white with small areas of black as opposed to this month's statement, which was black with tiny patches of white.

My husband surprised me with a TiVo television recorder for my birthday. It was a lovely gesture, but he failed to take into account that it had taken me four months to understand my old VCR, three weeks to figure out how to set my digital alarm clock and after six years, I still don't know how to program my convection oven.

I admit that I enjoy my digital camera that will hold 200 photos. It's wonderful being able to snap pictures and instantly look at the camera's small screen to view images of places I've been, family gatherings and memorable celebrations. But, I've now taken 200 pictures, and I don't know how to get them out of my camera, into my computer, onto my screen and printed. I suppose it's time to buy an additional camera.

Before computers, cell phones, digital cameras and TiVo recorders, I actually thought I was smart. Not the case anymore. I now agree with my granddaughter who calls me TechnoAmish.


Technology Gives me a Headache

I didn't want a cell phone. I was perfectly content with my landline telephone and felt no need to reach out, touch or be touched by anyone. I loved the quiet periods that came with driving, and wandering through shops and parks, alone and non-communicative. Now, if I don't answer my phone in the middle of dinner at a restaurant, callers worry and later reprimand me for having turned it off.

Technology frustrates and baffles me. When I reluctantly caved in and bought a cell phone, I did it so I could call for help if I was lost or mugged. I hadn't bargained for a built-in camera, a recording device, access to the Internet, email and texting capabilities, games, a calculator and dozens of other alleged amenities that I never use, don't need and don't understand. I resent being prompted by a robot who doesn't react when I scream obscenities at it. My greatest technological accomplishment this year was learning how to turn up my cell phone's volume.

I watched a 12-year-old kid text messaging on his cell phone. His fingers raced over the key pad nearly as fast as Kim Kardashian can remove her clothes. I thought if he could do it I could too, but he'd typed and sent a 10-word message while I was still searching for the "I" in "Hi."

My teenage granddaughter sent me an email from her cell phone during History class in school. As if that wasn't bad enough, she used text messaging abbreviations. She might as well have typed it in Swahili. To make a point, I responded using a form of shorthand I'd learned in an Adult Education course. She answered saying she hadn't understood a word, which made me feel good.

Computers drive me crazy, too. I miss my Underwood typewriter. The only time I worried about it crashing was when it sat too close to the edge of my desk. I could type obscene letters and bomb threats if I felt like it and not worry about incriminating evidence being stored in its innards. It never caught a virus or sent me messages on how to enlarge my manhood.

I do admit, though, that the Internet is wonderful for research. As a full blown Dyslexic, it's far easier for me to navigate than to use the Dewey Decimal system at the library, where my repeated number reversals always had me searching for books in the wrong section.

Before I learned how to navigate the World Wide Web, I didn't know I needed a six-foot long bronze sculpture that's now in my front yard. I didn't realize my home could be enhanced if I bought that 20-inch high silver table that I may have to hang from the ceiling because it won't fit any place else. I didn't realize the ease of ordering all kinds of makeup, miracle diet pills, miracle wrinkle creams, books, shoes and exotic foods. I never enjoyed the friendship of so many hundreds of people I probably wouldn't like if I ever actually met them.

Before the Internet, my credit card statements were white with small areas of black as opposed to this month's statement, which was black with tiny patches of white.

My husband surprised me with a TiVo television recorder for my birthday. It was a lovely gesture, but he failed to take into account that it had taken me four months to understand my old VCR, three weeks to figure out how to set my digital alarm clock and after six years, I still don't know how to program my convection oven.

I admit that I enjoy my digital camera that will hold 200 photos. It's wonderful being able to snap pictures and instantly look at the camera's small screen to view images of places I've been, family gatherings and memorable celebrations. But, I've now taken 200 pictures, and I don't know how to get them out of my camera, into my computer, onto my screen and printed. I suppose it's time to buy an additional camera.

Before computers, cell phones, digital cameras and TiVo recorders, I actually thought I was smart. Not the case anymore. I now agree with my granddaughter who calls me TechnoAmish.


Instagram’s Snapchat competitor Bolt leaks

Snapchat's meteoric rise made one thing abundantly clear -- the market would soon be flooded with copy cats. The next major player to try and drink Snapchat's milkshake might be Instagram. A banner introducing Bolt, a service for "one tap photo...


Google Folds Its Workforce Management Tool, Maps Coordinates, Into Maps Engine Pro

2014-07-24_0843


Watch This Bot With a Broken Leg Learn To Walk Straight Again

Watch This Bot With a Broken Leg Learn To Walk Straight Again

Humans are highly adaptable creatures, and we'll do anything we can to prevent an injury from completely immobilizing us. So if robots are supposed to eventually take over all of our duties, they need to learn how to quickly bounce back from damage as well—which is what this research with walking robots is hoping to achieve.

Read more...




Hands-On With The Revamped iOS App For We Heart It, The Feel-Good Social Photo Site

weheartitios


From Babysitter to Teacher: Setup Your Kids’ Tablets for Creative Learning

Educators around the world are embracing mobile learning in what is considered a relentless and inevitable march towards the 'flipped' classroom. The average family today owns at least a handful of mobile devices, which invariably end up serving as modern-day babysitters, among other duties. Is there something we can learn from teachers to turn such free-form playtime into opportunities for learning?

Consumption: Playing with apps is one thing, but it is increasingly clear to educators that making the incredible wealth of information on the web accessible (while making it age-appropriate, of course) is a vital cog in the mobile learning experience.
Curation: An app like Notability allows kids to save their own articles, annotate them, highlight passages, add a picture, drawing, chart or sticky note, integrate a website or media, and add their own voice, effectively transcending what can be done on pen and paper.
Creativity: Check out apps like Explain Everything, Book Creator, Animoto, iMovie, Garage Band, VoiceThread, Doodlecast, etc. Such apps put your kids at the center of the content creation process, which makes for a far more powerful learning experience than just consuming content.
Connection: One of the primary motivations for kids to engage in creative activities is to share the product of their efforts. With family, friends, and peers. Create an environment that is conducive for creative collaboration, a virtual play network perhaps, and you'll see how it enriches the creator and the consumer.

Next time you consign the family tablet to its babysitting duties, think like a teacher. Have an underlying plan in place. As HarvardX Research Fellow Justin Reich puts it, don't "think of iPads as repositories of apps, but rather as portable media creation devices."


Hitpost Founder, Designer Aaron Krane Joins Khosla Ventures As An EIR

aaron-krane


Valve Might Have Made Its Steam Controller a Little Less Peculiar

An analog thumbstick would bring Valve's game controller more in line with traditional ones.


Deals: Your New Soundbar, Custom Bluetooth Speaker, Timbuk2 Sale

Deals: Your New Soundbar, Custom Bluetooth Speaker, Timbuk2 Sale

Today's Amazon deal of the day is a highly-rated Polk Audio soundbar that'll be perfect for upgrading your home theater, or streaming music from your phone via Bluetooth. Today's price is over $80 less than Amazon has ever sold it for, and I'd be surprised if it lasts all day. [Polk Audio 39" Bluetooth Soundbar, $150]

Read more...




You Can Actually Buy a Flux Capacitor Car Charger Now

You Can Actually Buy a Flux Capacitor Car Charger Now

The folks at ThinkGeek put so much effort into their April Fool's Day prank products every year that often times they end up turning them into a reality. Remember the Star Wars Tauntan sleeping bag ?, that started life as a prank. And of all the wonderful products ThinkGeek pretended to announce on April 1 this year, the Back to the Future Flux Capacitor car charger is the one to get the IRL nod.

Read more...




Will you jump ship if Apple doesn’t announce a 5.5-inch iPhone?

If nothing else, Apple rumors are persistent. Given enough time, you'll be able to hear the same report more than a few times over the course of a few months, usually so often it will be drilled into your head. Yet, at the same time you're going to hear the exact opposite report probably just as often, contradicting that original rumor in one way or another.

For the 4.7- and 5.5-inch iPhone 6/Air, the majority of talk is about release dates (if you don't include the plethora of leaks for the smaller, 4.7-inch iPhone 6), and how Apple is apparently still trying to figure out whether or not the largest iPhone model will make an appearance alongside the "smaller" version in September.

Indeed, the reports have gone back and forth quite a bit. And they just won't stop.

Even today, there has been word floating around since early this morning that suggests Apple will wait to launch the 5.5-inch iPhone 6 by up to a few months! In the brightest light, the one where we're only dealing with positive feelings, that means Apple could, potentially, launch the largest iPhone yet smack-dab in December.

Or, it could mean that Apple waits until the first part of 2015 to launch.

This is an interesting situation. There's a big part of me that wants to say that, beyond any shadow of a doubt Apple is going to launch both models of the iPhone 6 at the same time. Because, at the very basic level, they're still the same iPhone model, just with a bigger display on one of them. However, with rumors that Apple could shove more features into the 5.5-inch iPhone 6, the company could start marketing them differently. Just like other companies do with the ridiculous number of phones they sell every year.

In September, when Apple is believed to be announcing the new smartphone, there is now a real chance that they don't include the 5.5-inch model in those talks at all. Which means the larger iPhone will continue to be a unicorn, just a product of rumors and conjecture, for another stretch of time. And I can't help but wonder if that'll be the straw that breaks the camel's back for some consumers.

Because waiting is hard for some, and maybe even especially more so for the ones who have been waiting for Apple to use bigger displays while using their smaller devices the whole time. If Apple doesn't launch the biggest iPhone this year, or even mentions its existence, I can't help but think there are going to be people who jump ship out of frustration.

Plus, there's probably going to be a Galaxy Note 4 (or whatever they decide to call it) announced around the same time, with plenty of rumors and leaks leading up to it, and that'll certainly have a big enough display.

What about you? Have you been looking forward to the 5.5-inch iPhone 6, and if Apple doesn't announce it (even if they announce the 4.7-inch model) are you going to jump ship for another platform? Which one? Let me know!



Secret Escapes Acquires My City Venue To Add More Events To Luxury Travel Club

My City Venue


Why Can’t We Protect Commercial Planes From Attacks?

Why Can't We Protect Commercial Planes From Attacks?

Last week's downing of Malaysian Airlines Flight 17 over the disputed territory of Eastern Ukraine has set off worldwide outcries against the conflict, and calls to better defend commercial airlines from missile attack. But is it even possible to defend civilian jets against military-grade weapons?

Read more...




Oculus Starts Shipping Its Next-Gen Rift VR Headset A Bit Later Than Expected

Screen Shot 2014-07-24 at 9.03.02 AM


HP Printer and PC boss: Lenovo is the LAST thing on my mind

The Register - Found 3 hours ago
A retrench is not surprising; HP flirted with slabs via the doomed TouchPad when Mad Leo was on board, and with smartphones too.


HP SlateBook hands-on review: HP’s SlateBook brings Android to …



SilverPush Says It’s Using “Audio Beacons” For An Unusual Approach To Cross-Device Ad Targeting

silverpush graphic


Imoji For iPhone Lets You Turn Any Image Into A Custom Emoji

imoji marketing 2


Elite F-14 Flight Officer Explains Why The Tomcat Was So Influential

Elite F-14 Flight Officer Explains Why The Tomcat Was So Influential

We sat at the end of the runway, our F-14's GE-110 motors humming, awaiting our clearance to begin what would be the last F-14 Demonstration ever. The Air Boss's voice crackled over the radio: "Tomcat Demo, you're cleared to five miles and 15k feet. The air show box is yours" At that very moment, I distinctly remember what my Commanding Officer told us before the show: "Fellas, make it a memorable one… just not too memorable!"

Read more...




Oppo Find 7 review: A solid phone that faces stiff competition

The Galaxy S5. The One M8. The G3. Every notable player in the overcrowded smartphone space has a flagship, one heroic device that the company pins its hopes on... for a year or so, anyway. For Oppo, a Chinese phone maker whose profile has swelled...


Blink Is An Affordable Wireless Security Cam For Your Home

Blink


President Obama Plans Action On Drone Privacy Regulation

Screen Shot 2014-07-24 at 8.14.53 AM


Uber Comes To Flint And Makes Me Very Happy

IMG_9775


Unleashing the power of quantum dot triplets

Another step towards faster computers relies on three coherently coupled quantum dots used as quantum information units. Quantum computers have yet to materialize. Yet, scientists are making progress in devising suitable means of making such computers faster. One such approach relies on quantum dots-a kind of artificial atom, easily controlled by applying an electric field. A new study ...


This Super-Efficient Lightbulb Uses Tesla Tech for an Incandescent Glow

This Super-Efficient Lightbulb Uses Tesla Tech for an Incandescent Glow

Despite their inefficiency, old-school incandescent lightbulbs sure did put out a pleasant, natural-looking light. The folks at Finally Light Bulb missed that light, so they brought it back with an efficient, affordable bulb using technology Nikola Tesla once patented. The team visited Gizmodo's NYC office to show us the light.

Read more...




UK politician calls for in-game thieves to be prosecuted like real criminals

In some of the most popular multiplayer role-playing games, like World of Warcraft (the NSA's favorite), in-game characters and items can change hands for substantial amounts of real money. So when a gamer is relieved of valuable loot or accounts by...


Sony Xperia Z3 poses for more leaked photos, including close-up of its side

Sony Xperia Z3 side leak

Apparently when it rains Sony Xperia Z3 leaks, it pours.

After appearing in a couple of leaked photo shoots and then having most of its specs revealed to all, the Sony Xperia Z3 has shown itself in a couple more leaked images. Shared by @evleaks, the photos show a device similar to the one in previous leaks, complete with a flat, Sony Xperia-branded back panel. The side of the Z3 is curved, which differs from the flat sides found on past Xperia Z models, and we can see that it’s got a dedicated camera button.

If the leaks that we’ve seen so far hold true, then the Xperia Z3 may not be radically different from the Xperia Z2 that launched earlier this year. Its curved sides should make it a bit more comfortable to hold, though, and that could actually be a pretty big improvement. If Sony sticks to the release schedule that we’ve seen from it in the past, we could see the Xperia Z3 make its official debut at IFA in September, meaning that it may only be a little over a month before this thing is made officially official.

Hit up the link below for another leaked Sony Xperia Z3 photo.

Via @evleaks



Twitter Releases Diversity Report, Tells Same Story As Other Tech Companies – Madame Noire

Madame Noire
Twitter Releases Diversity Report, Tells Same Story As Other Tech Companies
Madame Noire
After some pressure from civil rights groups like Rev. Jesse Jackson's Rainbow PUSH Coalition and ColorofChange.org, along with the transparency of other Silicon Valley giants like Facebook and Google, Twitter has released its diversity numbers. And, no


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