Tech alliance asks the FCC to investigate data cap exceptions

Some big names in tech don't believe that the FCC's net neutrality rules do enough to keep internet providers honest. A group of dozens of companies and advocacy groups (including Etsy, Foursquare, Kickstarter, Mozilla and Reddit) has sent a letter t...

Rumors are flying about new Xbox consoles and streaming devices

E3 kicks off on June 12th and Microsoft will be there in full-force, showing off the latest and greatest Xbox games and hardware. The company hasn't yet revealed what it'll announce at the big show, but The Verge and Kotaku claim Xbox is working on t...

21-Year Old Karolina Demianczuk Created 3.3 Million Spontime App

Technological startups are quickly becoming the dream of graduate students everywhere as they require little assets to begin and have the potential to grow into a highly profitable business. However, an entrepreneur must also be able to gauge the market, match present needs, and stand out among the crowd of wannabes. This is exactly what Karolina Demianczuk did with her recently released smartphone app "Spontime", which is already reported to be worth three millions dollars.

2016-05-24-1464113393-5412753-KarolinaDemianczuk3.jpg
(Photo: Spontime founder Karolina Demianczuk)

Although Karolina is still a student, Karolina is poised to revolutionize the tech world with her product, and is quickly following a trajectory to attaining success. Her Spontime project is supported by Rotary International, Silicon Valley Acceleration Centre, Polish Trade Office in Washington DC, and Warsaw School of Economics.

Unlike traditional apps whose goals are to keep the consumer in front of their electronic device for as long as possible, Spontime tries to do the exact opposite by making it easy to connect with friends face to face in real life. It does this by allowing users to post their spontaneous plans, and have their friends sign up to join them. Due to its nature, there are no messaging or commenting features yet so everything is planned outside of the app. This way, all conversations take place without technology so people can spend time with others rather than a virtual ghost.

2016-05-24-1464113480-8923384-LaunchFestival.jpg
(Photo: Spontime app on a user's smartphone)

Featured on Forbes, the app has gained amazing popularity even in today's digitized world. In its first day alone, there were over two thousand download requests, proving that Karolina has hit the jackpot. The product also proves that something does not have to have fancy features to garner interest. The app is meant to be used for organizing mundane, commonplace activities such as jogging or going out to eat, ensuring that everyone gets the chance to hook some company no matter when or where. The implications of this are huge as well. With this app, people can have fun without the stress of planning anything in advance.


(Video: What is Spontime?)

Karolina states that her experiences travelling abroad - to over thirty countries as well as living in three - were the inspiration for her app. Despite all of the cultural differences, people everywhere are finding it difficult to maintain relationships without the frills and ease of technology. Her app pushes its users to go beyond sharing cat videos and funny pictures; they can share in actual experiences and make meaningful memories. It is integral that people can distance themselves from their devices, which is hard to achieve considering the prevalence of Wi-Fi hotspots and smartphones.


(Video: Spontime Teaser)

In short, Spontime is a refreshing reminder to remain in real life and maintain relationships with people outside of a digital chatroom, a notion very few seems to understand in the world today. Demianczuk 's success is not just due to the popularity of any and all types of social media; it is also because Spontime takes the 'social' to another level, a place where everyone needs and wants to get to but cannot with traditional apps. Once the product hits the app store (it is free to download), people can expect fewer pings on their phone and more opportunities to connect in real life.

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Osmo’s blocks are like Lego for coding

There's a growing sense among educators and parents that learning to code is a valuable life skill. The UK has implemented programming in its computing curriculum, and several companies have cropped up with toys and games designed to teach young'uns...

Is Xbox TV Coming?

Xbox One Logo Technology

We might soon see a Chromecast competitor

Microsoft might be gearing up to release a Chromecast competitor aligned with the Xbox brand. The Verge reports that internet speculation suggests two forms that such a…

Microsoft cutting 1,850 jobs as part of effort to ‘streamline’ smartphone hardware business

Microsoft Lumia 950 XL, Lumia 950

One week after it was revealed that Microsoft was selling its feature phone business, the company is making major changes to its smartphone division.

Microsoft

This Huge Camera Rig Busts People for Texting and Driving

If you live in British Columbia, don’t try to sneak out a quick text while driving just because you don’t see any cops on the road. The RCMP., Canada’s version of the FBI, have started using DLSR cameras attached to massive scopes to spot distracted drivers from as far as three-quarters-of-a-mile away.

Read more...

Feeding Cows Antibiotics Could Be Much Worse Than We Thought

We’ve heard a lot about how stuffing cows full of antibiotics is accelerating the superbug apocalypse . That alone should convince us to stop, but if you needed more evidence, here’s another dirty secret: antibiotics could be making cows gassier and boosting their contribution to global warming.

Read more...

Make Perfect Steaks Every Time With the Best Sous Vide Machine

Over the past three years, we’ve tested over a dozen sous vide setups to find the best for your kitchen. We like the Anova Precision Cooker (Wi-Fi Edition) the best because it’s reliable, works with almost any container, and has a decent app that you will actually want to use. If you don’t need the range of Wi-Fi, Anova also makes a cheaper, Bluetooth-only version.

Read more...

Spotify’s Discover Weekly playlists have 40 million listeners

Everybody hates Mondays, but Spotify listeners probably hate them a bit less than most. That's when the service's "Discover Weekly" playlists get refreshed, which offer a selection of personalized tracks based on your listening habits. Since launchin...

You can play the new ‘Legend of Zelda’ early in New York City

You won't be left out of the E3 festivities just because you can't make it to Los Angeles for E3 Live. Nintendo is giving gamers in New York City an opportunity to play The Legend of Zelda for the Wii U between June 14th and June 19th if they're will...

Is Mark Zuckerberg Building a Doomsday Bunker On His Palo Alto Estate?

Mark’s Zuckerberg’s plans for world domination are well underway...and they might include his own backyard. The Facebook billionaire and reported pesky neighbor appears to be turning his Palo Alto estate into a fully-formed compound by razing four neighboring homes and building four smaller structures—including one that could be a damn doomsday bunker.

Read more...

A single European market won’t lead to a single European Netflix

The European Commission (EC) today published a large number of proposals in its ongoing pursuit of a Digital Single Market -- the notion that a person or company in one European nation should be able to buy goods from any person or company in another...

OnePlus 2 and OnePlus X get price cuts ahead of OnePlus 3 launch

OnePlus 2 hands-on

The OnePlus 3 is coming soon, and as a result, OnePlus has cut the prices on its other smartphones.

OnePlus today announced price cuts for the OnePlus 2 and OnePlus X. The OnePlus 2 is now available for $299 and the OnePlus X is down to $199, both of which are $50 price cuts. 

OnePlus

Riding shotgun in a DIY self-driving car

"I'm an idiot." Superhacker and Comma founder George Hotz is standing in a Las Vegas suite, and he's wearing a suit. That's saying something: He was the first person to hack the iPhone and PlayStation 3 while using the hacker name GeoHot. He doesn't...

Dear Mr. Zuckerberg: Thanks for ‘Free Basics’ in Africa, But We’re Not Totally Convinced

About a week ago, Nigeria -- Africa's largest economy and most populous country -- became the 40th country in the world, and the 22nd in Africa, to join Facebook's Free Basics.

With over 15 million active users (and growing), Facebook is very popular in Nigeria. Actually, it's more popular than the internet in Nigeria. In a 2015 survey by Geopoll, commissioned by Quartz, up to 65 percent of Nigerians who participated in the survey agree with the statement that "Facebook is the internet."

It's a shocking realization, but it makes sense since many Nigerians spend a huge chunk of their "internet time" on Facebook, Instagram and Whatsapp. (Note: for those who don't know, Instagram and Whatsapp are also owned by Facebook.)

Free Basics, which just launched in Nigeria, is part of Mark Zuckerberg's Internet.org initiative to bring internet access to billions of people living in the world's developing regions. With Free Basics, users have free access to a "limited edition" of the internet; they can access services and information on selected websites -- but cannot access all of the internet.

In essence, Mr. Zuckerberg is offering us just a slice of the internet. For millions of Africans who cannot afford to pay for continuous internet access, this slice is far more preferable to zero access.

This must be a good thing for Africa, right? After all, over the last decade, the internet has had a far more transformative impact in Africa than all the billions of dollars in foreign aid. The internet is Africa's biggest opportunity to accelerate development and leapfrog several decades of decline. It has become a springboard for entrepreneurship and innovation on the continent, and has proven to be a highly effective tool for deepening literacy, increasing access to information, promoting free speech and defending democracy.

With the progress Africa has achieved through the internet so far, one can only imagine how much more the continent can achieve when millions more come on board. And initiatives like Free Basics, backed by a heavyweight like Facebook, have a tremendous potential to bring millions of unconnected Africans online for the first time.

But unlike the ancient city of Troy which delightfully embraced the gifted "Trojan Horse," put down their guard and slumbered into the night, Africa must stay vigilant and keep its eyes on Free Basics, and other initiatives like it; or there could be very grave consequences if we don't.

While Africa should delightfully embrace Facebook's Free Basics, here's why we must keep our eyes open...

The Indian flop

Despite very promising prospects in one of the world's largest developing economies, Free Basics was kicked out of India, one of the few countries where it was first launched.

How come? Like Africa, India has a large population of people who have zero access to the internet.

However, the Telecoms Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) accused Facebook of handpicking internet services that are included in Free Basics, and for discriminating against websites outside its "walled garden," including Facebook's competitors. It also alleged that Facebook failed to answer standard questions concerning Free Basics, and blocked access to TRAI's designated email for users' feedback on the service.

In February 2016, Free Basics was sent packing as a result of the TRAI's "Prohibition of Discriminatory Tariffs for Data Services" regulations.

While Facebook claims to have learned hard lessons from its Indian flop, African governments and regulators must ensure that the flaws and concerns raised by the Indians are thoroughly addressed as Free Basics spreads across the African continent.

The nagging question of "net neutrality"

Net neutrality activists have been the fiercest and most outspoken critics of Free Basics, and other initiatives like it.

Net neutrality is a principle that advocates for equality and openness in the treatment of data and access to the internet; not discriminating or charging differentially by user, content, website, platform, application or mode of communication.

While Mr. Zuckerberg firmly believes that restrictive editions of the internet like Free Basics and the principles of net neutrality can co-exist, I have banged my head against the wall several times to imagine how that would happen.

Africa's history is littered with governments and "gatekeepers" who seek to censor and control access to information, monopolize public conversations, and regulate communication and expression. The open internet is helping to break that stranglehold, and the outcomes could change everything (or most things) for the continent. Therefore, it's in Africa's best interests to hold on to the principles of net neutrality to avoid a return to the "dark days."

Facebook says it doesn't handpick the services on Free Basics anymore, and now admits any service or website that meets its "criteria." This sounds comforting, but we must not lose our guard as long as Facebook -- a profit-driven, U.S.-based company -- retains gate-keeper powers over millions of Africans who will likely come online as a result of Free Basics.

Strangely, it's not as noble as it looks

Without a doubt, Facebook's Free Basics will have a huge impact on the lives of millions of Africans it'll bring on the internet.

But if Facebook's intention is to make internet access more affordable and available to more people on the continent, how come it doesn't have any data centers in Africa? Why isn't it investing in physical infrastructure and technologies that will bring down the cost of internet data in Africa? Why must content generated by Facebook users in Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya or anywhere else on the continent have to travel through undersea fiber-optic cables to data centers on other continents?

All these questions are begging for answers. After all, the costs of sending gigabits of traffic to overseas data centers would be totally unnecessary if Facebook stored African-generated content on African soil.

While we appreciate the noble intentions of Free Basics, Facebook's actions and strategic business investments in Africa need to reflect its vision of bringing internet access to all Africans. Not just a slice of the internet, but all of it.

Great for the short term, dangerous for the long

The immediate opportunities and rewards from bringing millions of Africans on the internet -- albeit on a restrictive basis -- far outweigh the potential "side effects" of initiatives like Mr. Zuckerberg's Free Basics.

While we continue to pursue investments and policies that will improve Africa's internet infrastructure and make access more affordable and widespread across the continent, Free Basics is a great practical solution, in the short term, to Africa's internet challenges.

For the long term, we must be very careful and deliberate. Africa cannot afford to have a section of its population force-fed on a limited version of the internet. For openness, equality, innovation and competition to thrive, every African should have the fundamental right to access any service or information on the open internet; without censorship, restrictions or discrimination.

Until this happens, Africa remains thankful to Mr. Zuckerberg for Free Basics, but we'll surely keep our eyes on it!

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

EU wants Netflix to offer 20 percent European content

The European Union is updating its broadcasting laws to cover online services like Amazon and Netflix. As part of the move, the union is looking to prevent these firms just leeching money out of the 28 member states without putting something back. Th...

Xiaomi’s Mi Drone is pretty affordable for what it does

We knew it was coming, so it's not a total surprise. But, the very fact that Xiaomi -- best known for its phones -- is getting into the drone business is a bit of an eyebrow raiser. Today, the company revealed the Mi Drone, a 4K camera-wielding quadc...

‘Hohokum’ developers make a roguelike full of loot and cute

It's been less than a year since Honeyslug, the trio behind games like Hohokum and Super Exploding Zoo disbanded to pursue solo projects. Today, we're seeing one of the first such efforts, Loot Rascals, a roguelike strategy game. Loot Rascals is the...

ICYMI: ‘Pepper’-oni pizzas, ‘Vibranium’ hyperloops and more

Today on In Case You Missed It: Softbank's domestic robot, Pepper, got a job at Pizza Hut welcoming visitors and taking orders. The Hyperloop company developed a metal that's ten times stronger than steel but five times lighter than aluminum -- of c...

Home Secretary submits to review of bulk surveillance powers

In an attempt to get the Labour Party on board with the Investigatory Powers Bill, Home Secretary Theresa May has committed to an independent review of the bulk powers it affords law enforcement and intelligence agencies. The controversial surveillan...

Scientists believe supermassive black holes had speedy births

Supermassive black holes found in the center of galaxies like the Milky Way might be super-huge, because they were born big in the first place. A team of astronomers from the Scuola Normale Superiore in Italy found evidence that these gigantic celest...

Apple rehires security expert to keep its encryption strong

Reuters says Apple has rehired security expert Jon Callas, part of a continued overhaul of its security team. Callas originally worked for Apple both in the 90s as well as more recently, between 2009 and 2011, where he worked on Mac security. Apple's...

Microsoft Is Demolishing Its Smartphone Business

A week after selling off its feature phone division , Microsoft has announced that it’s also “streamlining” its smartphone hardware business, cutting 1,850 jobs in the process.

Read more...

TripAdvisor is offering two free months of Google Play Music

Google Play Music is a solid service, but it's a bit of an afterthought in the marketplace compared to bigger players like Spotify and Apple Music. And in a crowded market, Google's likely looking for ways to muster up more interest and exposure for...

New Solar Cell Turns Light Into Heat to Potentially Double Effiency

There’s a annoying theoretical limit on the efficiency of solar cells that limits the amount of electricity they can create from sunlight. But now a team of MIT engineers has developed a system that overcomes the problem by first converting light to heat—and it could double the efficiency of solar cells.

Read more...

Microsoft kills what’s left of the old Nokia

Last week, Microsoft sold off what remained of Nokia's feature phone business while Windows Phone's market share slid below a single percent. Now, the company has taken what's clearly the last step in correcting Steve Ballmer's decision to purchase t...

Tech in Brazil is booming despite the country’s political troubles

It was a balmy night in Rio de Janeiro and a pretty J.P. Morgan Private Wealth representative was buying drinks for newly paper-rich entrepreneurs. Nearby at the pool mingled investors who had flown in from New York, San Francisco, London and Berlin. The next morning, entrepreneurs presented their well-funded ideas to the participants of Founders Forum Brazil 2012. Few of those companies… Read More

Sports Cameras Are Now Being Disguised as Model Airplanes

The so-called spidercam has changed the way we watch sports, allowing camera operators to shoot footage while moving vertically and horizontally above where the action happens. And now they’re being disguised as... airplanes?

Read more...

Mom behind most-watched Facebook Live video visits its HQ

It's only been a few months since Facebook opened up live video streaming to everyone, but with over a billion daily users the emergence of a massive hit was inevitable. Late last week an odd yet charming video stream of Candace Payne amusing herself...

An Artist Has Made the Louvre’s Pyramid Disappear

Now you see it, now you don’t. Street artist JR’s latest work has seen him shroud the large pyramid outside the Louvre in Paris with material that, at a glance, makes it look like the structure has disappeared altogether.

Read more...

ISS’ expandable module has a shield that protects it from debris

You had a lot of questions when we wrote about NASA gearing up to inflate BEAM on the ISS. Does it inflate like a balloon? What if it gets hit by micrometeoroids then? Does it protect against radiation? While there are many things we won't know for s...

Pod-based marijuana vaporizers are coming

As the wave of marijuana legalization lifts the country out of its longstanding fog of prohibition, one former Keurig executive and his 40-something marijuana enthusiast friend have found a way to ride it all the way to the bank: By creating a vapori...

‘Overwatch’ adding ranked play next month

Blizzard's much-publicized shooter Overwatch is finally out today, but it released without one very important component: Ranked play. Don't worry though. Lead game designer Jeff Kaplan has assured the community that feature is coming, as early as nex...

AT&T’s prepaid GoPhone plans get 1GB of extra data

AT&T definitely isn't being stingy with data on GoPhone these days. In the wake of healthy improvements over the past year, the carrier is raising its data caps by 1GB across the board as of May 27th. If you're on the $45 plan, you'll get 3GB o...

Crunch Report | Twitter Changes 140-Character Limit

Twitter is changing its 140-character limit, VW is investing $300 million into Uber Rival Gett, King Bach launches app Bachify, Twilio launches a sim based service and Toyota makes a strategic investment in Uber. Read More

LG G5 Cam Plus module and other Friends launch in LG’s US store

LG G5 hands-on

Following the LG G5’s US launch in April, the flagship Android phone’s friends have gone up for sale from LG.

LG G5LG

Dear Donald Trump: Immigrants Like Me Make America Great

2016-05-25-1464144207-6565200-picfordonaltrumpart.jpg
Silicon Valley is a place where boundaries of race, color, traditions, religions melt, and the multiplicity of cultures strengthens the fabric which has fueled America's economic engine of innovation. It goes against the grain of Siliconiers, with the upcoming presidential primaries in California, when Donald Trump declares that he "will make America great by building walls, by keeping Muslims out and bringing jobs back to America through reduced work visas." He is okay operating on the edge of legal boundaries, filing for bankruptcies numerous times without remorse, which we find not quite acceptable.

Here is a story, and it's my story. I was raised in India, but I am essentially a product of Silicon Valley. I arrived here for higher education and then followed my dreams in the Valley, like many other immigrants-turned-entrepreneurs. The acceptance, the inclusiveness, the opportunity, and the integrity of the Valley is magnetic and has upheld my idealism and has molded my thinking. When I graduated from UCLA with a master's in electrical engineering, I was the only woman in my class.


"When I graduated from UCLA with a master's in electrical engineering, I was the only woman in my class."


It was not easy for me to assimilate and integrate in America for almost 10 years, both culturally and because I remained one of few women amongst my colleagues for almost a decade. Nine months after my arrival in the US, I completed my master's degree with a 4.0 GPA. Yet it was not easy to find a job, because I did not have a work visa and needed an employer's sponsorship. I went for my job interviews in a sari because that was the most formal article of clothing that I owned. My attire, Indian accent, and lack of work visa were definite impediments, but did not stop me from landing a job at GTE Lenkurt in San Carlos, at the boundary of the then Silicon Valley just two towns north of Palo Alto.


"My attire, Indian accent, and lack of work visa were definite impediments, but did not stop me from landing a job..."


The Valley's culture imbues authenticity which immigrants and locals equally embrace. At GTE, I was told that I was the highest-paid of the 13 new graduates hired that year. GTE did not low-ball my offer even though I could have been had for much less. Later I worked for another company for eight more years but left when I was passed over for promotion which I felt I deserved. In my exit interview, the representative of the personnel department asked me if I thought that I had been denied the promotion because of my gender. I replied, "No, the other guy politically outsmarted me but I was the more capable candidate." They did not hedge or beat around the bush nor did I take advantage of them.

After this disappointment, I started my own technology company, Digital Link, with a coworker. I would become the first Indian woman to take a company public. When I started the company, people came out of the woodwork, people without whose help we would not have succeeded. A product manager at Northern Telecom, took special interest in getting our product approved. Selling the product to Northern Telecom and its customers, alleviated the pressure to raise immediate capital. He is still a great friend, after more than 30 years.

I hired Digital Link's first manufacturing manager with a small advertisement in a local newspaper. He took over the building keys, the day he walked in. Our first accounting manager, a 27 year old white American took over the checkbook. Our first VP of R&D, another young American became my confidant and business partner. Summit Partners, a VC firm, funded the company knowing I was pregnant with my first child. They had the kind of integrity that I did not know existed. Their morality and support along with market opportunity helped propel my company to IPO. As an immigrant, I combined my nimble disposition and my hunger for recognition with American ethics to design innovative products and services.

Silicon Valley is also a hot spot of reengineering an enterprise as technology develops and becomes obsolete just in the span of a few years. Entrepreneurs are die-hard people who refuse to give up. My company suffered a major set back when WorldCom, our largest customer filed for bankruptcy. They cancelled the orders on the books, and no more future orders were expected and we had to eat up their inventory at hand. We never recovered. Yet we struggled for over five years, and when we finally decided to close the doors, we refused to file for bankruptcy. We felt moral obligation to pay our employees, the banks, and the vendors, with some money coming from our own pockets. This is what entrepreneurs in the Valley do.

Donald Trump's thinking does not jive with this framework. We need to decide how to keep American dream alive, like in Silicon Valley, and to define what makes America great.

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

A smart toothbrush just won Intel’s maker-themed reality show

Last month, Intel the tried to make inventors cool. The company brought tinkering into prime time with the debut of America's Greatest Makers, a reality TV competition on TBS where 24 teams of inventors have been competing for a $1 million prize. Int...

Blizzard is offering one free Battle.net name change

Sick of heading into games registered to your Battle.net account as ResidentsLover or BeautifulDarkness83? You've got one free shot to make a change on Blizzard with the release of Overwatch.

The Strong Museum opens a DICE Awards exhibit

The Academy of Arts and Sciences (AIAS) holds its annual DICE (Design, Innovate, Communicate, Entertain) awards to recognize outstanding video games and the individuals who bring them to life., Basically, they're like the Oscars of the gaming industr...

Nexus Player disappears from Google Store

Nexus Player review

Another Nexus device bites the dust.

Google has stopped selling the Nexus Player in its official Google Store. Not only is the device missing from the “TV & Audio” section of Google’s shop, but the URL that used to take you directly to its product page now kicks you to the main “TV & Audio” section, which now shows the NVIDIA SHIELD as its sole Android TV device.

Google

This Silicon Valley Billionaire Has Been Secretly Funding Hulk Hogan’s Lawsuits Against Gawker

One of Silicon Valley’s best-known investors has been footing a former wrestler’s legal bills in lawsuits against a shared enemy.

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

This sweat monitoring patch can tell how hard you’re working

A group of scientists at UC San Diego are responsible for creating a tiny flexible monitor that can stick right to your sternum. Its purpose? Tracking your sweat.

Netflix comes full circle, creates virtual video store

First Netflix replaced tedious trips to the video store by mailing DVDs directly to your home. Then they replaced tedious trips to the mailbox by streaming movies directly to your laptop. Now, Netflix engineers have completely closed the loop by crea...

Vocal Fry Packs a Raw, Emotional Punch in Pop Music

The growing popularity of so-called “vocal fry,” particularly among young women, is either a hot new trend or the bane of cultured discourse, depending on who you ask. But when it comes to popular music, vocal fry actually enhances expressiveness.

Read more...

AT&T confirms GoPhone high-speed data allotment increase

AT&T logo Galaxy Note 5

Good news, AT&T GoPhone customers: yesterday’s rumor was true.

AT&T announced today that it will be increasing the high-speed data allotments on its $45 and $60 prepaid GoPhone plans. As of today, they include 2GB and 5GB, respectively, but those allotments will be bumped up to 3GB and 6GB.

The changes will take effect this Friday, May 27.

AT&T

GoPro makes a seemingly inevitable deal with Red Bull

Red Bull's extreme sports adventures are practically tailor-made for GoPro's action cameras, so it would only make sense if the two got together, right? Sure enough, that's what happening. GoPro has announced an exclusive deal with Red Bull that will...

Why Certain High-End Golf Clubs Make Such an Ear-Splitting Sound

Back in 2006, Nike introduced the high-performance SUMO 2 golf club driver, specially engineered to help golfers hit straighter shots, even for slightly off-center hits. There was just one problem: the newly designed club made an unpleasantly loud, tinny sound when it struck the ball—so much so, that most players proved unwilling to tolerate it, even in exchange for improved performance.

Read more...

Foursquare’s new bot texts food suggestions before you’re hungry

Foursquare is more than a friendly food finder and gentrification-tracking app -- the company is now in the bot business with its latest tool, Marsbot. The bot analyzes users' locations and past preferences to make proactive recommendations via text...

Samsung denies giving up on Android Wear for smartwatches

Hold your horses, folks: Samsung hasn't officially broken with up Android Wear just yet. A recent report from Fast Company cited unnamed Samsung executives who said the hardware giant wasn't working on any Android Wear smartwatches, and didn't plan t...

Researchers Just Answered One of the Big Questions About How Black Holes Form

Among the (many) mysteries surrounding the gigantic black holes that live at the center of galaxies is just how they managed to get so big, so fast. Finally, scientists have come up with an explanation for their improbably large existence.

Read more...

Could Apple truly pull off the 16GB model another year?

iPhone storage full

The short answer is “Yes,” and the long answer continues with, “and it’s starting to look like they just might.”

I don't know why I thought that Apple would, without question, ditch the 16GB base model in the iPhone 7. I guess I figured that the charade of keeping it up this long would end with a fresh generation. The 7 is already shaping up to be one of the most iconic iPhones yet, for better or for worse, and a recent leak managed to bring both excellent and horrible rumors to the table.

Apple

E Ink announces a color breakthrough, but it’s only for signs

There's a small glimmer of hope for the seemingly doomed dream of color electronic paper. E Ink, which helped pioneer ePaper by providing the technology for Amazon's Kindle, announced today that it's finally developed a display that can show up to 32...

Watch Lightning Creep Towards Earth In Super Slow Motion

Scientists at the Florida Institute of Technology recently captured a beautiful lightning storm using a new high speed camera.

Read more...

A Full-Color E Ink Screen Means Your Next Kindle Might Be Great For Magazines

Despite competition from tablets boasting full-color LCD displays, devices that use black and white electronic paper, like Amazon’s Kindle, have remained popular. And now that E Ink has created the first full-color electronic paper, e-readers have found yet another way to remain relevant.

Read more...

Watch A Useless, Beautiful Machine Sort Rocks

Jller Rock Sorting Machine Technology

Art imitates the drudgery of life

The machine sorts rocks.

Google stops selling the Nexus Player

The writing has been on the wall for a while, but it finally happened: Google has stopped selling the ASUS-made Nexus Player through its own store. Google hasn't said what prompted the move, but it tells us that you'll have to go to the handful of t...

Apple said to be prepping Amazon Echo competitor, opening Siri to third-party apps

Siri iPhone 6s Plus

One week after Google introduced Home, its Amazon Echo competitor, a report has emerged that claims that Apple is working on a similar device of its own.

Apple

Apple Is Reportedly Building an Echo Rival and Opening Siri to Developers

Less than a week after hearing about Google’s voice-controlled home assistant, The Information says that Apple has a similar inclination. The Cupertino company will reportedly open up the Siri API to third-party developers in the near future and will eventually make its own Amazon Echo rival.

Read more...

Apple reportedly working on a rival to Amazon’s Echo

While much of Silicon Valley has been duking it out with each other in the artificial intelligence wars, Apple has been strangely silent. But it might not be for much longer. The Information has just reported that Apple is working on two bold new mov...

Paul McCartney adopts VR so your grandparents don’t have to

For his latest release, Sir Paul McCartney is diving headfirst into virtual reality. As The Hollywood Reporter notes today, the 73-year-old former Beatle has filmed a six-part VR documentary series with Grammy winner Tony Kaye, who also directed Amer...

iOS 9.3.3 beta 1 update now available to public testers

iOS 9 iPhone 6s Plus

Just as expected, the first iOS 9.3.3 beta is now rolling out to public testers.

Apple is now pushing iOS 9.3.3 beta 1 to members of the Apple Beta Software Program. If you’re a part of that club, you can snow snag iOS 9.3.3 beta 1 over the air by heading into Settings > General > Software Update.

Apple

Huawei sues Samsung over alleged mobile patent infringement

Huawei P8 logo

It feels like it’s been a while since we’ve seen any major legal battles in mobile, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. That’s changing today, though.

HuaweiSamsung

How One in Ten Humans Could Be Wiped Out Within the Next Five Years

Recently, a group of forward-looking thinkers compiled a list of catastrophes that could kill off 10 percent or more of the human population within five years. This Gizmodo video explains how it could actually happen.

Read more...

Huawei sues Samsung over cellphone patents

No, the fighting between top smartphone makers isn't done just yet. Huawei has sued Samsung in both China and the US for allegedly violating its patents on cellular technology and software through its cellphones. Unlike what you see in many such laws...

Why Agile Release Planning is Critical for Product Management

2016-05-24-1464080436-6664527-release.png A product release is the launch of a new product or a combination of features that will provide value to customers or users. Digging deeper, a release is much more to both your customers and internal teams.

For your customers, it's a promise of new value they can look forward to embedding in their everyday work and activities. For your internal teams, a release helps them plan their work and when they'll be needed to launch great products.

When we talk about releases, teams often confuse the roll-out of new features from your backlog (a deployment) with the total customer experience. A release is not just the act of providing access to new technical functionality. Instead, think of a release as the date when the company is ready to deliver a new customer experience and support every customer interaction point associated with it.

Releases should take into account all the additional work that must be accomplished, such as updating the public website and training the customer support team. While the supporting teams (like development) may define a release through their lens of deploying code into production through a series of sprints, the product owner incorporates this perspective (and those of teams and customers) into a complete delivery.

In agile development, you may feel that there is no need to plan actual releases -- and some may consider the term "release planning" obsolete in an agile world. But the value of releases is methodology-agnostic.

Releases define your themed product journey, and represent major launch milestones for that overall journey.

You may choose to call it a "launch," an increment, or some other name. Regardless, it is still a new offering your customers will anticipate and ultimately expect. In addition, your internal supporting teams must accommodate the plan in their schedule if they are to assist your efforts.

A release -- and the plan to get there -- provide your customers a vision into the journey they'll be taking with your product. The release and its place in the journey also provide your teams valuable information on when they may need to engage on a dependency or market a new innovation (as just a few examples).

In an agile world, the actual dates of engagement may have less precision as far as committed targets. However, a general delivery plan - even in an agile framework - will continue to establish trust and expectation in your product with your customers and teams.

Standardizing a release management process
A standard process may likely mean different things to a product management team and a development team. Both perspectives are strongly incorporated into a dependable release management process. A release management process incorporates all of the following:

An initial release plan takes into account the team's velocity on the previous release (or general capacity to deliver) and the feature prioritization to create a general scope, sequencing, and timeline for the release. During release planning, a general expectation on the number of sprints or iterations to deliver the scope is achieved.

The accuracy of this expectation and plan depends on whether the team's capacity is well-known as well as the level of detail (or grooming) the scope has been through during estimation. This general plan will also provide expectations of major product changes (or dependencies) for products that may depend on your roadmap or platform.

Plans will be revisited after each iteration. For this reason, a tracking of an external release target (with quarterly, monthly, or other precision) can be helpful. It will still set the expectation and trust with your customers, but can be refined by you as the plan progresses.

Phased communication and supporting team engagement
Product managers know best how to deliver their product successfully -- and that includes a series of non-development tasks of engagement with supporting teams to complete items like documentation, sales training, or marketing campaigns.

As a product manager, using a launch planning tool will enable you to create a "gold standard" for major delivery. Use this template to engage your greater team, who may be supporting multiple products in the portfolio only when needed. A standard for launch also sets expectation for when these teams will be needed internally.

Repeatable stages to readiness
Establish standardized status at both the release and feature level to indicate overall health of the plan. Status provides an "Are we good?" pulse point that can be key to seeing around corners and proactive risk mitigation.

A release status will enable communication to your internal stakeholders, while feature status workflows enable granular visibility into the readiness of the feature and its current status with respect to development, staging, or QA environments.

Regardless of whether your release plan is executed in sprints or via more waterfall methodologies, regular check-ins and adjustments to plan are necessary. Use your sprint closure to adjust plans as needed, or schedule regular reviews to ensure plans are on track.

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Hacker Who Exposed Hillary Clinton’s Email Server Expected To Plead Guilty

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A Romanian computer hacker who revealed the existence of a private email server used by Hillary Clinton when she was secretary of state is expected to plead guilty to hacking-related offenses, a U.S. law enforcement official said on Tuesday.


Accused hacker Marcel Lazar, who used the alias "Guccifer," is scheduled to enter a guilty plea at a hearing early on Wednesday before Judge James Cacheris in U.S. District Court, Alexandria, Virginia, said the official.



He was indicted on charges including wire fraud, unauthorized access of protected computer, aggravated identity theft, cyberstalking and obstruction of justice.


The official and another person familiar with the Guccifer investigation, who asked not to be named ahead of the proceedings, said Lazar's plea would not validate claims he has made in recent media interviews about successfully hacking the email server Clinton installed at her home in Chappaqua, New York. She used it to handle both official and personal message traffic when she was Secretary of State.


The two sources said the U.S. investigation of Lazar turned up no evidence to support thehacker's claims that he had broken into Clinton's private server. Its contents and operations are the focus of an FBI investigation.


Lazar's public defender, Shannon Quill, did not respond to a request for comment.


In an interview with NBC News before his extradition from Romania, Lazar claimed that Clinton's private server "was like an open orchid on the internet."


Clinton, law enforcement and national security officials have said there is no evidence that Guccifer or any other unauthorized or outside party breached Clinton's private server.


None of the State Department-related message traffic that moved through the private server when Clinton served as secretary of state was marked and treated as classified.


However, among the targets of Guccifer's hacking was an AOL email account used by Sidney Blumenthal, a former Clinton White House aide and unofficial adviser.



function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible);

Blumenthal's lengthy memos to Clinton on foreign policy were sent to her private server. Guccifer's publication of a set of these messages led to the exposure of Clinton's unconventional email arrangement.


Reviews by government departments, including two spy agencies, found that dozens of messages that moved through Clinton's private server contained classified information, including material the government later deemed top secret.


But officials also said none of the classified material in Clinton's servers included whole documents copied word for word from secret government servers.


(Editing by Kevin Drawbaugh and Cynthia Osterman)

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Hacker Who Exposed Hillary Clinton’s Email Server Expected To Plead Guilty

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A Romanian computer hacker who revealed the existence of a private email server used by Hillary Clinton when she was secretary of state is expected to plead guilty to hacking-related offenses, a U.S. law enforcement official said on Tuesday.


Accused hacker Marcel Lazar, who used the alias "Guccifer," is scheduled to enter a guilty plea at a hearing early on Wednesday before Judge James Cacheris in U.S. District Court, Alexandria, Virginia, said the official.



He was indicted on charges including wire fraud, unauthorized access of protected computer, aggravated identity theft, cyberstalking and obstruction of justice.


The official and another person familiar with the Guccifer investigation, who asked not to be named ahead of the proceedings, said Lazar's plea would not validate claims he has made in recent media interviews about successfully hacking the email server Clinton installed at her home in Chappaqua, New York. She used it to handle both official and personal message traffic when she was Secretary of State.


The two sources said the U.S. investigation of Lazar turned up no evidence to support thehacker's claims that he had broken into Clinton's private server. Its contents and operations are the focus of an FBI investigation.


Lazar's public defender, Shannon Quill, did not respond to a request for comment.


In an interview with NBC News before his extradition from Romania, Lazar claimed that Clinton's private server "was like an open orchid on the internet."


Clinton, law enforcement and national security officials have said there is no evidence that Guccifer or any other unauthorized or outside party breached Clinton's private server.


None of the State Department-related message traffic that moved through the private server when Clinton served as secretary of state was marked and treated as classified.


However, among the targets of Guccifer's hacking was an AOL email account used by Sidney Blumenthal, a former Clinton White House aide and unofficial adviser.



function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible);

Blumenthal's lengthy memos to Clinton on foreign policy were sent to her private server. Guccifer's publication of a set of these messages led to the exposure of Clinton's unconventional email arrangement.


Reviews by government departments, including two spy agencies, found that dozens of messages that moved through Clinton's private server contained classified information, including material the government later deemed top secret.


But officials also said none of the classified material in Clinton's servers included whole documents copied word for word from secret government servers.


(Editing by Kevin Drawbaugh and Cynthia Osterman)

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Toyota is investing in Uber

Toyota is expanding its ride-sharing initiatives by investing in Uber, according to Bloomberg. The publication says that the pair have "entered into a memorandum of understanding to explore collaboration in ride-sharing." Sure. In 2014, Toyota starte...

The Web Eats the Movie Business – True or False?


1. Future of Film - in a digital world
Netflix CCO Ted Sarandos on how his 'disruptive' methods are ensuring the future of film
http://www.latimes.com/la-et-mn-0521-blur-netflix-ted-sarandos-20160515-snap-story.html

Hollywood Rushes to VidCon to Connect With Millennials

2. Too Much TV?
http://www.vulture.com/2016/05/peak-tv-business-c-v-r.html

3. BRANDS AND DOCS
Why so many brands are making documentaries

4.The Plague of BOTS
Videology, White Ops Say They Blocked More Than 28 Billion Bot Requests
http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/276000/videology-white-ops-say-they-blocked-more-than-28.html

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

The Web Eats the Movie Business – True or False?


1. Future of Film - in a digital world
Netflix CCO Ted Sarandos on how his 'disruptive' methods are ensuring the future of film
http://www.latimes.com/la-et-mn-0521-blur-netflix-ted-sarandos-20160515-snap-story.html

Hollywood Rushes to VidCon to Connect With Millennials

2. Too Much TV?
http://www.vulture.com/2016/05/peak-tv-business-c-v-r.html

3. BRANDS AND DOCS
Why so many brands are making documentaries

4.The Plague of BOTS
Videology, White Ops Say They Blocked More Than 28 Billion Bot Requests
http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/276000/videology-white-ops-say-they-blocked-more-than-28.html

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

What’s taking up all the storage on your devices?

microSD card

One of the best things about my time with switching phones all the time was not having to rely on the cloud. Back then, I was moving from devices in the Android ecosystem, with a few pit stops here and there with Windows Phone, and that meant support for microSD cards. I legitimately thought that was a huge bonus back then, even when I was still transitioning most of my files, pictures, and videos over to the cloud.

Apple

SteelSeries ships its OLED-packing gaming mouse

Did you look at SteelSeries' display-toting Rival 700 mouse in January and think it was just the edge you needed for your gaming exploits? It's time to do something about it. The company's Rival 700 is now available for a pricey (though not outlandis...

You Can Help Redesign The Spaceship Buildings From ‘Men In Black’

The New York State Pavilion Technology

The iconic New York State Pavilion is in disrepair, but a competition wants to change that

A vertical gallery showcasing some of the best new designs for the New York State Pavilion.
Go to Top

Hit Counter provided by Seo Australia