A Lonely Heart Could Worsen a Cold

People who feel isolated tend to have worse symptoms, research shows

Discovery of new predatory dinosaur species gives new insight on their evolution

Jayc Sedlmayr, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cell Biology & Anatomy at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Medicine, was part of an international team of scientists who discovered a new tyrannosaur with an unusual mode of evolution. Their findings include that Daspletosaurus horneri, or "Horner's Frightful Lizard," evolved directly from its geologically older relative, D. torosus, a rare form of evolution called anagenesis where one species gradually morphs into a new one. The research also changes the face of tyrannosaurs, which the team concluded was covered by a lipless mask of large, flat scales, with smaller patches of armor-like skin and horn, as well as a highly touch-sensitive snout. The work is published online in Nature Research's Scientific Reports.

Test of Mars-bound instruments in the Black Forest

The "InSight" Mars mission planned for 2018 by NASA and European partners is aimed at studying geophysical properties of the "red planet." In addition, fundamental questions relating to the planetary and solar system shall be answered to better understand the history of creation of planets of the inner solar system, one of which is the Earth. A highly sensitive seismograph (SEIS) will be one of the main instruments of the mission. The qualifying model, or sister instrument, of this seismometer is presently being tested by the joint geoscientific observatory of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Universität Stuttgart, the Black Forest Observatory (BFO).

DC Reveals Final Batman: The Button Covers

DC Reveals Final Batman: The Button Covers

When DC Comics released its “DC Universe: Rebirth” in May 2016, the publisher laid the groundwork for a new continuity that reintroduced long-absent characters and paved the way for the potential return of teams like the Legion of Super-Heroes and the Justice Society of America. However, the key revelations involved Wally West, missing time and the possible behind-the-scenes involvement of the Watchmen.

RELATED: DC Previews Batman/Flash Lenticular Crossover Cover, Updates Retailers

Following months of clues and questions, those mysteries will be addressed head on next month in “The Button,” a four-part crossover involving “Batman” and “The Flash.” While DC revealed some intriguing lenticular covers for the event last month, the publisher has now debuted the remaining covers for “Batman” #22, the third chapter in the storyline.

Batman #22 by Jason Fabok

Batman #22 by Jason Fabok

The two covers — one by Jason Fabok and the other by Tim Sale — tease the return of Thomas Wayne as the Batman, his first appearance in that role since the events of “Flashpoint.” In that alternate timeline he assumed the costumed identity following the murders of his wife Martha and son Bruce.

Batman #22 by Tim Sale

Batman #22 by Tim Sale

“The Button” begins in April in “Batman” #21 and “The Flash” #21, and concludes in May in “Batman” #22 and “The Flash” #22. The “Batman” issues are written by Tom King and illustrated by Fabok, with “The Flash” by Joshua Williamson and Howard Porter. All four issues will feature lenticular covers by Fabok.

RELATED: A Speedster Returns in DC’s Batman/Flash Watchmen Crossover

The story explores the mystery of how The Comedian’s blood-splattered smiley face button from “Watchmen” appared in the Batcave at the end of  “DC Universe: Rebirth” #1. It was the first time elements from Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ seminal “Watchmen” have appeared in the DC Univers.

Here’s DC’s official description for “The Button”:

Two greatest detectives in the DC Universe unite to unravel the mystery behind a certain blood stained smiley face button stuck in the Batcave wall. However, what begins as a simple investigation soon turns deadly when the secrets of the button prove irresistible to an unwelcome third party — and it’s not who anyone suspects! This is a mystery woven throughout time, and the countdown starts here!

“Batman” #22, by King and Fabok, goes on sale May 3.

The post DC Reveals Final Batman: The Button Covers appeared first on CBR.

DC Reveals Final Batman: The Button Covers

DC Reveals Final Batman: The Button Covers

When DC Comics released its “DC Universe: Rebirth” in May 2016, the publisher laid the groundwork for a new continuity that reintroduced long-absent characters and paved the way for the potential return of teams like the Legion of Super-Heroes and the Justice Society of America. However, the key revelations involved Wally West, missing time and the possible behind-the-scenes involvement of the Watchmen.

RELATED: DC Previews Batman/Flash Lenticular Crossover Cover, Updates Retailers

Following months of clues and questions, those mysteries will be addressed head on next month in “The Button,” a four-part crossover involving “Batman” and “The Flash.” While DC revealed some intriguing lenticular covers for the event last month, the publisher has now debuted the remaining covers for “Batman” #22, the third chapter in the storyline.

Batman #22 by Jason Fabok

Batman #22 by Jason Fabok

The two covers — one by Jason Fabok and the other by Tim Sale — tease the return of Thomas Wayne as the Batman, his first appearance in that role since the events of “Flashpoint.” In that alternate timeline he assumed the costumed identity following the murders of his wife Martha and son Bruce.

Batman #22 by Tim Sale

Batman #22 by Tim Sale

“The Button” begins in April in “Batman” #21 and “The Flash” #21, and concludes in May in “Batman” #22 and “The Flash” #22. The “Batman” issues are written by Tom King and illustrated by Fabok, with “The Flash” by Joshua Williamson and Howard Porter. All four issues will feature lenticular covers by Fabok.

RELATED: A Speedster Returns in DC’s Batman/Flash Watchmen Crossover

The story explores the mystery of how The Comedian’s blood-splattered smiley face button from “Watchmen” appared in the Batcave at the end of  “DC Universe: Rebirth” #1. It was the first time elements from Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ seminal “Watchmen” have appeared in the DC Univers.

Here’s DC’s official description for “The Button”:

Two greatest detectives in the DC Universe unite to unravel the mystery behind a certain blood stained smiley face button stuck in the Batcave wall. However, what begins as a simple investigation soon turns deadly when the secrets of the button prove irresistible to an unwelcome third party — and it’s not who anyone suspects! This is a mystery woven throughout time, and the countdown starts here!

“Batman” #22, by King and Fabok, goes on sale May 3.

The post DC Reveals Final Batman: The Button Covers appeared first on CBR.

Lighter, more efficient, safer lithium-ion batteries

Researchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and the Council for Scientific Research (initialed CSIC in Spanish) have patented a method for making new ceramic electrodes for lithium-ion batteries that are more efficient, cheaper, more resistant and safer than conventional batteries.

The beginning of the end of order: Experiments prove Mermin-Wagner fluctuations

Classical physics states that a crystal consists of perfectly ordered particles from a continuous symmetrical atomic structure. The Mermin-Wagner theorem from 1966 broke with this view: it states that in one-dimensional and two-dimensional atomic structures (for example in an atomic chain or membrane) there cannot be perfect ordering of particles over long ranges.

Fragmentation of tropical forests increases global emissions of greenhouse gases

When talk is of important ecosystems, tropical forests are top of the list. After all, half of the carbon stored in all of the Earth's vegetation is contained in these ecosystems. Deforestation has a correspondingly fatal effect. Scientists estimate that this releases 1000 million tonnes of carbon every year, which, in the form of greenhouse gasses, drives up global temperatures. That is not all, however, reveals a new study by the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the University of Maryland. A team of scientists has discovered that fragmentation of formerly contiguous areas of forest leads to carbon emissions rising by another third. Researchers emphasise in the scientific journal Nature Communications that this previously neglected effect should be taken into account in future IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) reports.

Modern alchemy creates luminescent iron molecules

A group of researchers at Lund University in Sweden have made the first iron-based molecule capable of emitting light. This could contribute to the development of affordable and environmentally friendly materials for e.g. solar cells, light sources and displays.

Here’s how air pollution kills 3,450,000 people a year

Health

Coal is costly

As the president rolls back regulations that keep our air clean, how will air pollution hurt the global population? Read on:…

What climate change means for leaf litter

The carbon dioxide coming from some of Earth's tiniest residents may not be increasing as quickly as some believed in the face of global climate change.

Tunneling under Stonehenge—the effects of urban sprawl

Earlier this month, officials in England proposed a plan that could alleviate traffic on one of the most congested highways from London to southwest England. The idea involves digging a tunnel just south of Stonehenge, the prehistoric and heavily protected monument.

Researcher finds ways to reduce stress in shelter dogs

"Who's a good dog? You are, aren't you? Yes, you're the best dog that ever was."

Why states are pushing ahead with clean energy despite Trump’s embrace of coal

On Tuesday, March 28, President Trump traveled to the Environmental Protection Agency to sign an executive order rolling back a number of climate-related regulations that have taken effect over the past eight years. The president's team claims this effort will help bring our nation closer to energy independence, and that it will begin the process of resuscitating a coal industry that has experienced serious decline in the past decade.

Injustice 2 Brings On the Bad Guys: Grodd, Bane & More Have Arrived

Injustice 2 Brings On the Bad Guys: Grodd, Bane & More Have Arrived

Even in a world where heroes battle each other, there’s got to be some villains. The folks behind “Injustice 2” understand this, and with the release of a new trailer for the anticipated video game sequel, we meet some of the unrepentantly evil faces fans can battle as or against.

RELATED: Injustice 2: Supergirl Battles Superman, Black Adam in New Trailer

Gorilla Grodd, Bane, Captain Cold and the most frightening Scarecrow we’ve ever seen throw down with Green Lantern, Flash, Firestorm and more in new footage from Warner Bros. Interactive and NetherRealm’s upcoming fighting game. Plus, check out key art featuring all-new looks for Captain Cold and Scarecrow.

Developed by NetherRealm for Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment, the sequel to the hit 2013 video game “Injustice: Gods Among Us” continues the storyline, with Batman and his allies work toward putting the pieces of society back together while struggling against those who want to restore Superman’s regime. However, in the midst of that chaos, a new threat appears that will put Earth’s existence at risk.

RELATED: Jim Lee’s Injustice 2 Cover Pits Batman & More Against Brainiac

“Injustice 2” features such playable characters as Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Supergirl, Harley Quinn, Gorilla Grodd and Blue Beetle, with arenas in DC Universe locations like Gotham City, Metropolis and Atlantis.

Power up and build the ultimate version of your favorite DC legends in INJUSTICE 2. With a massive selection of DC Super Heroes and Super-Villains, INJUSTICE 2 allows you to equip every iconic character with unique and powerful gear earned throughout the game. Experience an unprecedented level of control over how your favorite characters look, how they fight, and how they develop across a huge variety of game modes. This is your super Hero. Your Journey. Your Injustice.

The post Injustice 2 Brings On the Bad Guys: Grodd, Bane & More Have Arrived appeared first on CBR.

Injustice 2 Brings On the Bad Guys: Grodd, Bane & More Have Arrived

Injustice 2 Brings On the Bad Guys: Grodd, Bane & More Have Arrived

Even in a world where heroes battle each other, there’s got to be some villains. The folks behind “Injustice 2” understand this, and with the release of a new trailer for the anticipated video game sequel, we meet some of the unrepentantly evil faces fans can battle as or against.

RELATED: Injustice 2: Supergirl Battles Superman, Black Adam in New Trailer

Gorilla Grodd, Bane, Captain Cold and the most frightening Scarecrow we’ve ever seen throw down with Green Lantern, Flash, Firestorm and more in new footage from Warner Bros. Interactive and NetherRealm’s upcoming fighting game. Plus, check out key art featuring all-new looks for Captain Cold and Scarecrow.

Developed by NetherRealm for Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment, the sequel to the hit 2013 video game “Injustice: Gods Among Us” continues the storyline, with Batman and his allies work toward putting the pieces of society back together while struggling against those who want to restore Superman’s regime. However, in the midst of that chaos, a new threat appears that will put Earth’s existence at risk.

RELATED: Jim Lee’s Injustice 2 Cover Pits Batman & More Against Brainiac

“Injustice 2” features such playable characters as Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Supergirl, Harley Quinn, Gorilla Grodd and Blue Beetle, with arenas in DC Universe locations like Gotham City, Metropolis and Atlantis.

Power up and build the ultimate version of your favorite DC legends in INJUSTICE 2. With a massive selection of DC Super Heroes and Super-Villains, INJUSTICE 2 allows you to equip every iconic character with unique and powerful gear earned throughout the game. Experience an unprecedented level of control over how your favorite characters look, how they fight, and how they develop across a huge variety of game modes. This is your super Hero. Your Journey. Your Injustice.

The post Injustice 2 Brings On the Bad Guys: Grodd, Bane & More Have Arrived appeared first on CBR.

The importance of crop genetic diversity

In North Carolina, the seventh most-productive blueberry state in the U.S., blueberries ripen between June and August. But North Carolina shoppers can buy blueberries throughout the year. That's because most people only eat a few kinds of food, so farmers around the world are growing the same crops to meet the demand of consumers thousands of miles away. As Rob Dunn points out in his new book, that practice poses some significant risks.

‘Molecular activity painting’ to control and monitor switch-like, light-controlled perturbations inside cells

The plasma membrane serves as a major hub for signal cascades to control crucial cellular processes. But it is a fluid medium, which makes the signaling processes difficult to monitor. Now, German scientists have designed a molecular "paintbrush" technique to trigger, control, and also monitor signaling processes. As they write in the journal Angewandte Chemie, their modular system made of light-activatable molecular building blocks can, for example, induce patterned contraction inside living cells.

Confused by data visualisation? Here’s how to cope in a world of many features

The late data visionary Hans Rosling mesmerised the world with his work, contributing to a more informed society. Rosling used global health data to paint a stunning picture of how our world is a better place now than it was in the past, bringing hope through data.

Curbing coffee cup usage

The use of disposable coffee cups could be reduced by 50 – 300 million annually according to research announced today by leading coffee roaster Bewley's.

Helping refugee children to read—with computer games

Some 2.5 million Syrian children receive no education in Arabic because of conflict in their homeland. They reside mainly in neighbouring countries, such as Turkey and Jordan, where they often receive little or no schooling at all.

Titans Annual #1 Adds Even More Mystery to Rebirth

Titans Annual #1 Adds Even More Mystery to Rebirth

SPOILER WARNING: The following article contains major spoilers for “Titans Annual” #1, by Dan Abnett and Minkyu Jung, on sale now.

Since the start of DC’s Rebirth, the Titans and Justice League have been in a pretty complicated place. With the return of Wally West awakening the memories of only his closest friends, and the Titans coming back onto the scene less than a year ago, the relationship between the two groups has been strained at best and nonexistent at worst. After twelve issues, the Titans have only interacted with their mentors in their own title only in bits and pieces, with Wally being their main envoy. The rest of the members of either team haven’t shown much interest in pursuing the familiarity with one another in these group settings, beyond the occasional off hand mention.

It’s been a bit strange to say the least, particularly in light of the relative strength of “Titans” on it’s own. What’s more, it’s left the “legacy” of the team relative to the rest of the DCU up in the air — an odd choice, considering one of the main tenants of Rebirth according to Geoff Johns was a return of “legacy” in all it’s forms.

In short, the Titans have been in dire need of a moment to reexamine, reconnect and rebuild old bridges — and thankfully that’s just what the first “Titans” annual of the Rebirth era sets out to do, with the added bonus of expanding upon some of the bigger mysteries of the post-Rebirth DCU in one neatly organized package.

KEYHOLES

The one-shot story opens with members of the Titans and Justice League kidnapped; transported to a bunker against their will with no recollection of how or why they’ve been placed there. The Titans present are Dick Grayson, Wally West, Donna Troy and Garth; the Justice League representatives are Batman, The Flash, Wonder Woman and Aquaman.

Notice a pattern?

It turns out this roster of heroes and their sidekicks were specifically picked by none other than The Key — a former Justice League villain who has been relatively off the board since the start of the New 52 — and a mysterious benefactor he’s found himself working for. The Key’s power set, aside from obviously having to do with, well, keys, is based around “psycho-chemicals” which grant him access to extra senses. With these extra senses, The Key is able to manipulate even the most powerful telepaths and, apparently, even tap into the multiverse — or, in his own words, “unlock every last secret in [his] head,” something that the Rebirth DCU certainly has no shortage of.

However, it would seem that nigh-limitless self awareness isn’t enough. The Key is acting under orders from someone — an outside presence — and has been promised a gift of even more awareness if he can successfully accomplish this gambit with the Titans and the League. The end goal is to “harvest” the psychic energy that comes from the emotional conflict between mentors and proteges, which, apparently, is specific in the way it can only come from the sort of extreme conflict between people who really know how to hurt one another.

titans-key

Said negative energy apparently powers something for the Key’s employer, so the Key’s plan is to stir the pot in his little prison by throwing replicas of enemies like Metallo and squads of Parademons at them until the pressure eventually makes them snap. Then, while they’re busy being at each other’s throats, he’ll take the bad vibes produced all the way to the bank. In theory, it’s not a bad plan, but with both Nightwing and Batman in the mix, it gets deciphered and dismantled pretty quickly.

WHO IS DONNA TROY?

The major trump card the Key believes he has, even after the Bats have deduced his scheming and thrown a wrench into his manipulations, relates back to one of the most complicated characters in DC’s line up: Donna Troy.

Since her introduction in in 1965, Donna’s backstory has become an infamous web of retcons and reboots, involving everything from alternate earths to time travel to full on cloning. More recently, her New 52 origin story established her as an enemy of Wonder Woman, created from the remains of Hippolyta, to be a perfect Amazonian queen — not exactly the best way to position her in the current Wonder Woman legacy as it’s been written out in Rebirth. Later, during the Rebirth prelude series “Titans Hunt,” Donna had her origin modified a bit more, but the specifics remained largely very vague. As far as readers have been concerned, the details of how Donna went from her role as usurping weapon to normal Titan were still a mystery.

Luckily, the truth about Donna’s newly (re-)reworked status quo comes to light here, care of some carefully applied pressure from the Key and one of Batman’s bio-scanners which suspiciously reports that there are only seven traditional life signs in a room containing eight people. This would be because Donna isn’t actually “organic” in the traditional sense, something Diana reveals to the group — and to Donna, who had no idea.

titans-donna-troy-origin-summary

The New 52 story of Donna being designed as a weapon made to take on Diana remains intact, apparently minus the remains of Hippolyta bit, but is taken a step further. Rather than destroy Donna, Diana and her fellow Amazons defeated her and then implanted false memories within her consciousness, making Donna forget she was ever anything but a normal Amazonian girl.

As you might imagine, Donna doesn’t take the news very well — all part the Key’s plan to generate that negative emotional energy. Luckily, her Titans teammates are able to step in before the tension between the Amazons boils over.

EXTRA DIMENSIONAL DOORS

Through their combined efforts, the imprisoned Titans and League members are eventually able to find the Key before he’s able to skim enough emotional turmoil from them to fulfill his quota. Luckily, for someone as powerful as he is, he’s really not interested in taking on so many heroes at once.

The Key beats a hasty retreat through one of his extra-dimensional doors, apparently escaping to whatever alternate dimension (or…far off location? It’s never made explicitly clear) his employer has been hiding. He attempts to apologize for his failure but it doesn’t seem like his employer is all that happy with excuses. By the sound of things (which is to say: screaming, and lots of it,) it’s unlikely we’ll see a return of the Key any time soon.

titans-key-lost

Unsurprisingly, the mysterious employer is never seen or named, leaving the nature of the Key’s involvement in the bigger picture of Rebirth still pretty ambiguous. However, it’s impossible to ignore the connections. For one, the Titans deep connection to the “bigger picture” of Rebirth, care of Wally West, is undeniable. Whatever happens in the future of the DCU, it’s extremely unlikely that the “Titans” ongoing is going to be anywhere but close to the heart of it. Also, the themes of negative energy and hopelessness are undeniably Rebirth-centric, relating all the way back to “DC Universe: Rebirth” #1.

If the Key really was working for or with someone pulling strings in Rebirth, some interesting complications arise. The mastermind behind Rebirth (Dr. Manhattan, perhaps?) is powerful enough to remake entire realities, so why would they need to enlist the help of someone like the Key to do their dirty work for them? And if the Key was somehow working for Mr. Oz, why not show him to the readers, if not the heroes? Why would he enlist help now, after he’s been doing so well on his own? Is it possible that the Key was working for a third party, unrelated to the cosmic relating-altering force Mr. Oz keeps referring to and Mr. Oz himself? And if so…who is it?

Or, more importantly, what do they want?

The post Titans Annual #1 Adds Even More Mystery to Rebirth appeared first on CBR.

Titans Annual #1 Adds Even More Mystery to Rebirth

Titans Annual #1 Adds Even More Mystery to Rebirth

SPOILER WARNING: The following article contains major spoilers for “Titans Annual” #1, by Dan Abnett and Minkyu Jung, on sale now.

Since the start of DC’s Rebirth, the Titans and Justice League have been in a pretty complicated place. With the return of Wally West awakening the memories of only his closest friends, and the Titans coming back onto the scene less than a year ago, the relationship between the two groups has been strained at best and nonexistent at worst. After twelve issues, the Titans have only interacted with their mentors in their own title only in bits and pieces, with Wally being their main envoy. The rest of the members of either team haven’t shown much interest in pursuing the familiarity with one another in these group settings, beyond the occasional off hand mention.

It’s been a bit strange to say the least, particularly in light of the relative strength of “Titans” on it’s own. What’s more, it’s left the “legacy” of the team relative to the rest of the DCU up in the air — an odd choice, considering one of the main tenants of Rebirth according to Geoff Johns was a return of “legacy” in all it’s forms.

In short, the Titans have been in dire need of a moment to reexamine, reconnect and rebuild old bridges — and thankfully that’s just what the first “Titans” annual of the Rebirth era sets out to do, with the added bonus of expanding upon some of the bigger mysteries of the post-Rebirth DCU in one neatly organized package.

KEYHOLES

The one-shot story opens with members of the Titans and Justice League kidnapped; transported to a bunker against their will with no recollection of how or why they’ve been placed there. The Titans present are Dick Grayson, Wally West, Donna Troy and Garth; the Justice League representatives are Batman, The Flash, Wonder Woman and Aquaman.

Notice a pattern?

It turns out this roster of heroes and their sidekicks were specifically picked by none other than The Key — a former Justice League villain who has been relatively off the board since the start of the New 52 — and a mysterious benefactor he’s found himself working for. The Key’s power set, aside from obviously having to do with, well, keys, is based around “psycho-chemicals” which grant him access to extra senses. With these extra senses, The Key is able to manipulate even the most powerful telepaths and, apparently, even tap into the multiverse — or, in his own words, “unlock every last secret in [his] head,” something that the Rebirth DCU certainly has no shortage of.

However, it would seem that nigh-limitless self awareness isn’t enough. The Key is acting under orders from someone — an outside presence — and has been promised a gift of even more awareness if he can successfully accomplish this gambit with the Titans and the League. The end goal is to “harvest” the psychic energy that comes from the emotional conflict between mentors and proteges, which, apparently, is specific in the way it can only come from the sort of extreme conflict between people who really know how to hurt one another.

titans-key

Said negative energy apparently powers something for the Key’s employer, so the Key’s plan is to stir the pot in his little prison by throwing replicas of enemies like Metallo and squads of Parademons at them until the pressure eventually makes them snap. Then, while they’re busy being at each other’s throats, he’ll take the bad vibes produced all the way to the bank. In theory, it’s not a bad plan, but with both Nightwing and Batman in the mix, it gets deciphered and dismantled pretty quickly.

WHO IS DONNA TROY?

The major trump card the Key believes he has, even after the Bats have deduced his scheming and thrown a wrench into his manipulations, relates back to one of the most complicated characters in DC’s line up: Donna Troy.

Since her introduction in in 1965, Donna’s backstory has become an infamous web of retcons and reboots, involving everything from alternate earths to time travel to full on cloning. More recently, her New 52 origin story established her as an enemy of Wonder Woman, created from the remains of Hippolyta, to be a perfect Amazonian queen — not exactly the best way to position her in the current Wonder Woman legacy as it’s been written out in Rebirth. Later, during the Rebirth prelude series “Titans Hunt,” Donna had her origin modified a bit more, but the specifics remained largely very vague. As far as readers have been concerned, the details of how Donna went from her role as usurping weapon to normal Titan were still a mystery.

Luckily, the truth about Donna’s newly (re-)reworked status quo comes to light here, care of some carefully applied pressure from the Key and one of Batman’s bio-scanners which suspiciously reports that there are only seven traditional life signs in a room containing eight people. This would be because Donna isn’t actually “organic” in the traditional sense, something Diana reveals to the group — and to Donna, who had no idea.

titans-donna-troy-origin-summary

The New 52 story of Donna being designed as a weapon made to take on Diana remains intact, apparently minus the remains of Hippolyta bit, but is taken a step further. Rather than destroy Donna, Diana and her fellow Amazons defeated her and then implanted false memories within her consciousness, making Donna forget she was ever anything but a normal Amazonian girl.

As you might imagine, Donna doesn’t take the news very well — all part the Key’s plan to generate that negative emotional energy. Luckily, her Titans teammates are able to step in before the tension between the Amazons boils over.

EXTRA DIMENSIONAL DOORS

Through their combined efforts, the imprisoned Titans and League members are eventually able to find the Key before he’s able to skim enough emotional turmoil from them to fulfill his quota. Luckily, for someone as powerful as he is, he’s really not interested in taking on so many heroes at once.

The Key beats a hasty retreat through one of his extra-dimensional doors, apparently escaping to whatever alternate dimension (or…far off location? It’s never made explicitly clear) his employer has been hiding. He attempts to apologize for his failure but it doesn’t seem like his employer is all that happy with excuses. By the sound of things (which is to say: screaming, and lots of it,) it’s unlikely we’ll see a return of the Key any time soon.

titans-key-lost

Unsurprisingly, the mysterious employer is never seen or named, leaving the nature of the Key’s involvement in the bigger picture of Rebirth still pretty ambiguous. However, it’s impossible to ignore the connections. For one, the Titans deep connection to the “bigger picture” of Rebirth, care of Wally West, is undeniable. Whatever happens in the future of the DCU, it’s extremely unlikely that the “Titans” ongoing is going to be anywhere but close to the heart of it. Also, the themes of negative energy and hopelessness are undeniably Rebirth-centric, relating all the way back to “DC Universe: Rebirth” #1.

If the Key really was working for or with someone pulling strings in Rebirth, some interesting complications arise. The mastermind behind Rebirth (Dr. Manhattan, perhaps?) is powerful enough to remake entire realities, so why would they need to enlist the help of someone like the Key to do their dirty work for them? And if the Key was somehow working for Mr. Oz, why not show him to the readers, if not the heroes? Why would he enlist help now, after he’s been doing so well on his own? Is it possible that the Key was working for a third party, unrelated to the cosmic relating-altering force Mr. Oz keeps referring to and Mr. Oz himself? And if so…who is it?

Or, more importantly, what do they want?

The post Titans Annual #1 Adds Even More Mystery to Rebirth appeared first on CBR.

Advances make reduced graphene oxide electronics feasible

Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a technique for converting positively charged (p-type) reduced graphene oxide (rGO) into negatively charged (n-type) rGO, creating a layered material that can be used to develop rGO-based transistors for use in electronic devices.

Who feels the pain of science research budget cuts?

Science funding is intended to support the production of new knowledge and ideas that develop new technologies, improve medical treatments and strengthen the economy. The idea goes back to influential engineer Vannevar Bush, who headed the U.S. Office of Scientific Research and Development during World War II. And the evidence is that science funding does have these effects.

In China and Pakistan’s coal romance, where’s the love for the climate?

If you were travelling via motorway from Islamabad to Lahore during November or December 2016, you might have felt like your head was in the clouds. That's thanks to the smog that engulfed large parts of Pakistan's Punjab and Sindh provinces in that period.

Arrow: No Shoes. No Shirt. No Kill.

Arrow: No Shoes. No Shirt. No Kill.

Diggle dropped a line in tonight’s episode that I feel I’d be doing a disservice if I didn’t start the column out with it. I’m not sure I’ve ever seen or heard a hero in a comic, TV show or movie say this and it’s too good to not repeat.

Read more

More Details on a Mysterious Landmark in Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Another name is being floated for the Akira remake. David Leitch talks about what might have been with one potential Cable for Deadpool 2. Annabelle 2 gets a name change. Plus, new pictures from Wonder Woman, good news for The Santa Clarita Diet, and a new look at The Flash’s return next month. Spoilers now!

Read more...

The dangers of the dark web

The dark web—which utilizes a technology created by military researchers in the 1990s to allow intelligence operatives to exchange information completely anonymously—is unknown to many. It's been said to be a breeding ground for organized crime, sex traffickers, and hackers. But it's also used by good actors, including whistle-blowers and activists.

Sensor warns when oil in CHP plants is no longer up to the job

Thanks to a new sensor system developed collaboratively by Professor Andreas Schütze and his research team at Saarland University and a group of industrial project partners, unnecessary oil changes could well be a thing of the past. The new system can provide operators of combined heat and power plants with reliable continuous feedback on the current state of the oil. And the system can also warn the operator if the condition of the oil suddenly deteriorates. The oil flows through a small measuring cell where it is analysed spectroscopically to record the condition of the oil. The method offers numerous benefits: it is better for the environment, it lowers operating costs and it simplifies maintenance scheduling.

Biomaterials for the regeneration of bone and cartilage tissues from apple waste

Researchers from UPM and CSIC have employed waste from the agri-food industry to develop biomaterials that act as matrices to regenerate bone and cartilage tissues, which is of great interest for the treatment of diseases related to aging.

Wood burning releases high amounts of secondary organic aerosols – current emission estimates too low

Aerosol emissions from logwood combustion increase significantly when the emission ages in ambient air. A significant increase occurs already within three hours of aging, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The emission increase was caused by the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in which gaseous organic compounds, released during the combustion, oxidise and condense on aerosol particles. This observation is very important, because current emission inventories do not take SOA emissions into consideration at all.

Yes, academics tend to be left wing – but let’s not exaggerate it

The accusation that that academia is disproportionately left-wing and liberal is not a new one. Nor is the main thrust of the claim, in a report by the Adam Smith Institute, contentious. Many accept that academics tend towards the left, even if we cannot be sure of precise levels of inclination or whether the tendency is on the rise. The more important issue is whether or not this actually matters, both in terms of impartiality in research and teaching, and equality for staff and students.

Explaining the accelerating expansion of the universe without dark energy

Enigmatic 'dark energy', thought to make up 68% of the universe, may not exist at all, according to a Hungarian-American team. The researchers believe that standard models of the universe fail to take account of its changing structure, but that once this is done the need for dark energy disappears. The team publish their results in a paper in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Bus-Sized Asteroid Buzzes Earth Closer Than Moon | Video

A roughly 26-foot (8 meter) asteroid named 2017 FJ101 came within 202,000 miles (~325,087 km) of Earth on Mar. 30, 2017. It was first observed on March 25, 2017.

To really help U.S. workers, we should invest in robots

America's manufacturing heyday is gone, and so are millions of jobs, lost to modernization. Despite what Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin might think, the National Bureau of Economic Research and Silicon Valley executives, among many others, know it's already happening. And a new report from PwC estimates that 38 percent of American jobs are at "high risk" of being replaced by technology within the next 15 years.

Take a peek inside Blue Origin’s new Shepard crew capsule

Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos provided a sneak peek today into the interior of the New Shepard crew capsule, the suborbital vehicle for space tourism. He released a few images which illustrate what the flight experience might be like on board.

Watch rotating horns of Venus at dawn

Have you seen it yet? An old friend greeted us on an early morning run yesterday as we could easily spy brilliant Venus in the dawn, just three days after inferior conjunction this past Saturday on March 25th.

Silicon sandwiches feed LHC’s upgraded collision appetite

In a special, dust-free, clean laboratory, straddling the Swiss-French border, a group of physicists spend their time probing hand-sized hexagons of silicon. These hexagons are a fraction of a millimetre thick and are made up of over a hundred smaller hexagons, individual sensors each roughly one centimeter across. Together with layers of metal, the sensors will form a new subdetector to replace part of the end-cap calorimeters in CERN's CMS experiment.

Charlize Theron Makes A Villain Out Of Vin Diesel In This ‘Fate Of The Furious’ Clip

More...

The 15 Worst Superhero Costumes

The 15 Worst Superhero Costumes

In the first 50 years of the world of superheroes, a comic book character changing his or her costume was a big deal (well, except for the Wasp, who famously changed costumes every other “Avengers” story arc). When Spider-Man’s black costume debuted, fans freaked out. In the last 25 years, though, costume changes have been much more common, and as a result, the proliferation of new costumes have led to a few iffy costume changes. However, even in the early days, the occasional ill-advised costume change would take place.

RELATED: Batman: His Best (And Worst) Costumes

In this list, we’ll count down the worst superhero costumes of all time. However, we have a couple of ground rules. Only major superheroes qualify, so no obscure superheroes whose costumes don’t really matter. Everyone on this list has had had their own ongoing comic book series at one point or another. Secondly, no costumes that were intentionally weird-looking on the list. If you try to make a costume look weird, odds are you’re going to succeed. No, these costumes were intended to look cool and it just did not work out that way.

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Due to the rule about not including costumes that were meant to be odd-looking, a few famously bad superhero costumes won’t make the list, so we figured that we’d quickly address them before the real list begins, just so you don’t feel like you’re missing out on them. Early on in her superhero career, Kitty Pryde would often try to make costumes for herself. Chris Claremont and Dave Cockrum would play this for comedic effect.

During the 1990s, Invisible Woman was possessed by the villainous Malice, which caused her personality to change and she temporarily wore a very provocative costume. It was meant to show that something was wrong with her. When Azrael took over as Batman in the 1990s, the idea by “Batman” editor Denny O’Neil was to show why the real Batman was so much better than an “extreme” hero, so Azrael as Batman was intentionally over-the-top. Similarly, when James Gordon temporarily took over as Batman with a mecha-armor, the comic itself made fun of the look of the armor, including the odd “rabbit ears” aspect.

SUPERMAN (ELECTRIC BLUE)

In 1996, Superman temporarily lost his super powers as part of a crossover called “Final Night,” where the Earth’s sun was extinguished. Superman’s powers worked on solar energy, so after enough time without the sun, his powers went away. Ultimately, the sun was re-ignited due to the sacrifice of Hal Jordan (back when he was a supervillain). However, Superman’s powers did not come back right away. Eventually, an experiment got Superman charged with solar energy and he was back to having powers.

The downside, though, was that he ended up becoming supercharged with solar energy, to the point where his body could no longer process it in the way it used to. Instead, his body basically became energy. He was still super-powerful, but in a completely different manner. All of that energy needed to be contained somehow, so Superman gained a containment suit that he wore until these powers went away. It’s not an awful costume period, but boy was it a bad fit for Superman, specifically.

DIANA (HOT PANTS ERA)

In 1994, Wonder Woman’s mother took a page out of Odin’s playbook and came up with an elaborate plot to protect her daughter. You see, she had learned that Wonder Woman was destined to be killed in battle, so she decided to make sure that her daughter, Diana, was no longer Wonder Woman. So she held a new contest to determine who would be Wonder Woman and then sabotaged her daughter by weakening her just enough so that she would lose the contest. The new Wonder Woman was an Amazon named Artemis (we recently wrote about her crazy history here).

Diana was not happy with her mother about the whole situation and she decided to continue being a superhero (as she still had all of her powers, she just didn’t have the weaponry that came with her Wonder Woman outfit). Her choice of outfit, though, was odd. She wore very short shorts and a shirt that wasn’t even quite a bra — it was barely more than pasties — plus a jacket too small to actually serve as a jacket.

IRON MAN (ORIGINAL GOLD ARMOR)

We would never begrudge Tony Stark for his original Iron Man armor not looking cool, as, come on, he literally built it while imprisoned by a warlord in a foreign country while dying of shrapnel in his chest that was making its way to his heart. His original Iron Man armor was built for two reasons only — the first was so that the chest-plate in the armor could keep the shrapnel from reaching his heart, and the second was so that he could fight his way out of captivity.

Once he returned to the United States, he realized that he could use the armor to fight crime as a superhero. The problem was that the ungrateful public were put off by his initial appearance. Iron Man then solved the problem by literally painting the armor gold. No improvements to the armor. No brand-new design. Just a simple paint job. “Oh dear lord, he’s hideous!” “Oh, wait, his armor is now painted gold. He looks awesome now!” Luckily, Iron Man then moved to a much cooler red and gold design a few issues later.

MAGNETO (HEADMASTER OF XAVIER’S)

Beginning with the revelation in “Uncanny X-Men” #150 that Magneto was a survivor of the Nazi Holocaust, Chris Claremont slowly began to build up a redemption arc for the character. This was aided by the earlier revelation by Claremont that before he became Magneto, the master of magnetism was a friend of young Charles Xacier and actually served along him as they fought against Baron Von Strucker and Hydra. The arc came to its conclusion in “Uncanny X-Men” #200 when Xavier asked Magneto to take over as headmaster of Xavier’s school while Xavier was in outer space recuperating from a brutal attack.

Now that he was on the side of the angels, Magneto could no longer rock his helmet look, which just screamed, “Villain!” to everyone. However, his new superhero costume was a bizarre choice, as it had a giant M on his chest (in case anyone forgot that he was Magneto?) and it was sleeveless, which is not usually something worn by an older fellow like Magneto. The arms tend not to be all that toned.

THOR (CROSSING ERA)

Around the time of the “Avengers” crossover event, “The Crossing,” pretty much all of the Avengers got new costumes, even characters like Thor that were not directly tied into the actual “Crossing” event. In the case of Thor, he was going through a tough time when it seemed like the World Tree was dying, sending the Asgardian gods into a spiral. So, Thor ended up getting a new oddly busy new costume, complete with a giant metal codpiece, plus long chains out of nowhere (seemingly out of the pages of “Spawn”) for his hammer.

The actual costume was not a bad design, but it seemed out of place for Thor to wear. The craziest thing, though, was that Thor didn’t even wear it! Despite being shown in promotional materials as his new look, he didn’t actually wear the costume, instead running around shirtless for most of the time that he was supposed to be wearing this new outfit. When he returned after temporarily dying with the rest of his teammates during “Onslaught,” he was back in his traditional costume.

GHOST RIDER (NOBLE KALE)

In 1990, Howard Mackie and Javier Saltares successfully re-launched Marvel’s Ghost Rider character, introducing a brand-new series starring a new version of the classic character. This new version was bonded with its human host, Dan Ketch, and wore black boots, gray pants and a black leather jacket. It was a classic biker look and it served the character well as Ketch became far more popular than the original Ghost Rider, Johnny Blaze (who wore a similar outfit as the original supernatural Ghost Rider).

While Blaze’s Ghost Rider had been due to a demon Zarathos, it was unclear how Ketch was empowered, until he learned that the “demonic” side of his being was actually that of Noble Kale, an ancestor of Ketch’s who had been cursed back in the 18th century and chose to kill himself rather than go through with the curse. Heaven and Hell fought over him and reached a compromise where he could possess his descendants and use them to transform into the Spirit of Vengeance. With this new knowledge, Noble decided to change his look, going for a bizarre choice of colors for a motorcycle-riding Spirit of Vengeance — lots of bright orange.

WARBIRD (RED ZONE)

After initially having her powers stolen by Rogue, Carol Danvers discovered new energy-based powers when she became the hero known as Binary. Eventually, those powers mostly burned out and she returned to Earth and sought to re-join the Avengers. Not wanting to use her old Ms. Marvel name, she instead adopted the codename Warbird during Kurt Busiek and George Perez’s run on “Avengers.” She served the team well, but ended up splitting from the team after she developed a drinking problem.

She returned to the team later in Busiek’s run and was in place when Geoff Johns took over writing the series (during that brief period where Johns was working for both DC Comics and Marvel Comics). Johns eventually wrote her out of the series at the end of the “Red Zone” arc, where she was offered a job in Homeland Security. Before she left, though, Olivier Coipel gave her an amazingly bland costume. It was basically just nondescript body armor. He was clearly going for a more militaristic look, but that didn’t need to equal boring.

THOR (GODPACK)

In the mid-1990s, Thor was in a strange place. After being missing for a few years while Eric Masterson took over as the new Thor, the Odinson returned and promptly came down with Warrior’s Madness and fought against Adam Warlock and the Infinity Watch. Once that was finished, Thor really didn’t particularly have anything to do, so incoming writer Roy Thomas tied him in with the High Evolutionary.

The High Evolutionary was always trying to create new superhuman teams and he succeeded with a new group of beings based on gods. Thor dubbed them the “Godpack” and actually joined their team. When he decided to join the group, he figured that he should get a new costume to commemorate the change. His new costume had one of the most unusual looks we’ve ever seen in a comic book costume. We’ve seen characters wear vests before, but not clothing only down the middle of the chest!

GUY GARDNER: WARRIOR (VULDARIAN ERA)

In 1994, DC Comics decided to dramatically revamp its “Green Lantern” line of books, which, at the time, had reached four ongoing series (three monthlies and a quarterly). The plan was to remove the Green Lantern Corps from the scene period and start over with a brand-new character being Green Lantern. As a result, DC canceled “Green Lantern: Mosaic” and “Green Lantern Corps Quarterly” and then had to make a major change in “Guy Gardner: Warrior,” a book where Guy Gardner used a yellow power ring (that was powered by Green Lantern rings).

Guy lost his ring (since there were no longer any Green Lantern Corps around to power it) and DC wanted him to get new powers. The Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers were popular at the time, so DC had Beau Smith try to do something similar with Guy, and Smith came up with the idea of Guy being part-alien. When he discovered his alien heritage, he gained the ability to transform his body into different weapons. He also now dressed like a member of his alien race, which involved tattoos all over his now-shirtless body.

WAR MACHINE (CROSSING ERA)

Around this same time, the comic book series “War Machine” was going through a similar issue as “Guy Gardner,” as it also wanted to distance itself from the comic book series that it spun off of, which was “Iron Man.” James Rhodes had been using a suit of armor designed by Tony Stark. Stark, though, was the villain of the “Avengers” crossover, “The Crossing,” and thus Rhodey could not get another suit of armor from him after Rhodey lost his original armor during a time traveling story arc.

Instead, Rhodes was chosen by some aliens to wear a special alien armor called WarWear. At first, he didn’t know why he was specifically chosen (it was his connection to Stark), so he thought it was some really weird coincidence that he lost an armor and then got new armor. This armor was intentionally designed to look very alien, but wow, it was really weird looking. When most of the Avengers (including Iron Man) were seemingly killed during “Onslaught,” Rhodes gave up the WarWear by sacrificing it to erase all information about the Iron Man technology from Stark Enterprises’ servers.

HAWKEYE (POST-KREE SKRULL WAR)

Interestingly enough, Clint Barton’s initial career as Hawkeye only lasted five years, as after five years under the Hawkeye name, Clint Barton adopted the growth powers and abandoned Goliath identity from Hank Pym (when Pym gave up on growing and became Yellowjacket). His Goliath costume was kind of goofy in and of itself, with the strange chest strap thing.

Anyhow, during the famous “Kree/Skrull War” storyline, the Avengers ended up in outer space and they all returned… except for Goliath. He wasn’t even gone a full issue before he showed up, to the great delight of his teammates. As it turned out, he had escaped back to Earth, as well, and landed in Eastern Europe where he got a job working in a traveling circus. Oddly enough, former Avenger Hercules was also in this circus (talk about coincidences!). Going back to his bowman ways, Hawkeye rocked an amusing, pants-less outfit. It did not last long.

HERCULES (CROSSING ERA AVENGERS)

Hercules had always been a bit of a tricky character for writers to incorporate into the Avengers due to the fact that he was a demigod living amongst mortals. His personality was so over-sized that he was a bit hard to relate to — he was basically just the strong guy on the team and the comic relief. When he returned to the Avengers during the famous Bob Harras/Steve Epting/Tom Palmer run, Harras tried to humanize the character more.

One of the ways he did so was to reduce his power level, as well as give Hercules a new costume (and a shave, since the Eric Masterson Thor was also on the team at the time and two bearded characters was apparently one beard too many). However, over time, the costume devolved to the point where it was basically just a stretched-out tank top. With his beard now gone, he sort of looked like a depressing Rocky Balboa, maybe from “Rocky V.”

BLACK CANARY (FLASHDANCE)

In the early 1980s, Black Canary was involved in one of the strangest retcons of all-time, when it was revealed that she was her own mother living in her comatose daughter’s body (her daughter was cursed with a Canary Cry, which explained why Canary suddenly had sonic powers). Eventually, the younger Canary then took back control of her own body. Wishing to distinguish herself from her mother, she then decided to get her own brand-new costume. It was a good idea, but the decision was made during the early 1980s and it very much embraced the fashion of the era.

It looked very much like something a superhero would wear to Jazzercise. The hilarious thing is that DC hyped up the new costume so much that they even homaged Canary’s original first cover appearance with the debut of the new look. The new look only lasted a few years before she re-embraced her mother’s style when she got her own solo feature in “Action Comics Weekly.” Artist Brian Bolland spoke for many comic book fans when he drew the cover of Canary’s first feature in “Action”…

You know a costume is bad when a whole cover is devoted just to burning it!

IRON MAN (NOSE ARMOR)

In 1972, Stan Lee officially became the Publisher of Marvel Comics. That ended his time as a regular ongoing writer for comics, but it was also a strange period in terms of his influence on the company. He was now above the Editor-In-Chief (a role a variety of creators went through between 1972-1978) but was not nearly as directly involved with the comics as he once was. He was mostly a hands-off boss. So when he did make comments, they were taken very seriously, but since he rarely discussed things, sometimes his directions would be misunderstood.

Lee once looked at a drawing of Iron Man that he thought looked like the helmet was drawn so small that a face couldn’t fit under it. He remarked, “Shouldn’t there be a nose?” That was taken to mean “Iron Man’s helmet should have a nose.” So, for a brief period, he did (to help scare villains — seriously!). In one comic, Iron Man went to San Diego Comic Con and everyone made fun of his new armor. Eventually, either Lee saw it and didn’t like it or people just got sick of it, so it was dropped. Hilarious stuff.

WONDER MAN (WEST COAST AVENGERS)

Wonder Man is the king of bad superhero costumes, and you could make an argument that a couple of his outfits belong on this list, but we don’t think any of them are egregious enough to quite crack the Top 15 except for this one, from 1986. You see, Wonder Man had moved to Hollywood to become an actor and when the Avengers opened up a West Coast branch, he was an easy pick for the team. However, as his profile rose with the new team in the area, he got cast in a major motion picture playing a version of the Conan-inpired Arkon.

His agent then got Wonder Man a brand-new, extremely garish costume. Again, this is a guy who had gone through some real stinkers in the past, but managed to top them all with this monstrosity. The Avengers then got lost in time for a long storyline. When they returned, writer Steve Englehart wrote the fan reaction to the costume into the comic, with movie fans within the comic book all expressing how much they hated his new look, so he changed back to his previous costume, which he has mostly kept since.

What do you think is the worst superhero costume ever? Let us know in the comments section!

The post The 15 Worst Superhero Costumes appeared first on CBR.

The 15 Worst Superhero Costumes

The 15 Worst Superhero Costumes

In the first 50 years of the world of superheroes, a comic book character changing his or her costume was a big deal (well, except for the Wasp, who famously changed costumes every other “Avengers” story arc). When Spider-Man’s black costume debuted, fans freaked out. In the last 25 years, though, costume changes have been much more common, and as a result, the proliferation of new costumes have led to a few iffy costume changes. However, even in the early days, the occasional ill-advised costume change would take place.

RELATED: Batman: His Best (And Worst) Costumes

In this list, we’ll count down the worst superhero costumes of all time. However, we have a couple of ground rules. Only major superheroes qualify, so no obscure superheroes whose costumes don’t really matter. Everyone on this list has had had their own ongoing comic book series at one point or another. Secondly, no costumes that were intentionally weird-looking on the list. If you try to make a costume look weird, odds are you’re going to succeed. No, these costumes were intended to look cool and it just did not work out that way.

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Due to the rule about not including costumes that were meant to be odd-looking, a few famously bad superhero costumes won’t make the list, so we figured that we’d quickly address them before the real list begins, just so you don’t feel like you’re missing out on them. Early on in her superhero career, Kitty Pryde would often try to make costumes for herself. Chris Claremont and Dave Cockrum would play this for comedic effect.

During the 1990s, Invisible Woman was possessed by the villainous Malice, which caused her personality to change and she temporarily wore a very provocative costume. It was meant to show that something was wrong with her. When Azrael took over as Batman in the 1990s, the idea by “Batman” editor Denny O’Neil was to show why the real Batman was so much better than an “extreme” hero, so Azrael as Batman was intentionally over-the-top. Similarly, when James Gordon temporarily took over as Batman with a mecha-armor, the comic itself made fun of the look of the armor, including the odd “rabbit ears” aspect.

SUPERMAN (ELECTRIC BLUE)

In 1996, Superman temporarily lost his super powers as part of a crossover called “Final Night,” where the Earth’s sun was extinguished. Superman’s powers worked on solar energy, so after enough time without the sun, his powers went away. Ultimately, the sun was re-ignited due to the sacrifice of Hal Jordan (back when he was a supervillain). However, Superman’s powers did not come back right away. Eventually, an experiment got Superman charged with solar energy and he was back to having powers.

The downside, though, was that he ended up becoming supercharged with solar energy, to the point where his body could no longer process it in the way it used to. Instead, his body basically became energy. He was still super-powerful, but in a completely different manner. All of that energy needed to be contained somehow, so Superman gained a containment suit that he wore until these powers went away. It’s not an awful costume period, but boy was it a bad fit for Superman, specifically.

DIANA (HOT PANTS ERA)

In 1994, Wonder Woman’s mother took a page out of Odin’s playbook and came up with an elaborate plot to protect her daughter. You see, she had learned that Wonder Woman was destined to be killed in battle, so she decided to make sure that her daughter, Diana, was no longer Wonder Woman. So she held a new contest to determine who would be Wonder Woman and then sabotaged her daughter by weakening her just enough so that she would lose the contest. The new Wonder Woman was an Amazon named Artemis (we recently wrote about her crazy history here).

Diana was not happy with her mother about the whole situation and she decided to continue being a superhero (as she still had all of her powers, she just didn’t have the weaponry that came with her Wonder Woman outfit). Her choice of outfit, though, was odd. She wore very short shorts and a shirt that wasn’t even quite a bra — it was barely more than pasties — plus a jacket too small to actually serve as a jacket.

IRON MAN (ORIGINAL GOLD ARMOR)

We would never begrudge Tony Stark for his original Iron Man armor not looking cool, as, come on, he literally built it while imprisoned by a warlord in a foreign country while dying of shrapnel in his chest that was making its way to his heart. His original Iron Man armor was built for two reasons only — the first was so that the chest-plate in the armor could keep the shrapnel from reaching his heart, and the second was so that he could fight his way out of captivity.

Once he returned to the United States, he realized that he could use the armor to fight crime as a superhero. The problem was that the ungrateful public were put off by his initial appearance. Iron Man then solved the problem by literally painting the armor gold. No improvements to the armor. No brand-new design. Just a simple paint job. “Oh dear lord, he’s hideous!” “Oh, wait, his armor is now painted gold. He looks awesome now!” Luckily, Iron Man then moved to a much cooler red and gold design a few issues later.

MAGNETO (HEADMASTER OF XAVIER’S)

Beginning with the revelation in “Uncanny X-Men” #150 that Magneto was a survivor of the Nazi Holocaust, Chris Claremont slowly began to build up a redemption arc for the character. This was aided by the earlier revelation by Claremont that before he became Magneto, the master of magnetism was a friend of young Charles Xacier and actually served along him as they fought against Baron Von Strucker and Hydra. The arc came to its conclusion in “Uncanny X-Men” #200 when Xavier asked Magneto to take over as headmaster of Xavier’s school while Xavier was in outer space recuperating from a brutal attack.

Now that he was on the side of the angels, Magneto could no longer rock his helmet look, which just screamed, “Villain!” to everyone. However, his new superhero costume was a bizarre choice, as it had a giant M on his chest (in case anyone forgot that he was Magneto?) and it was sleeveless, which is not usually something worn by an older fellow like Magneto. The arms tend not to be all that toned.

THOR (CROSSING ERA)

Around the time of the “Avengers” crossover event, “The Crossing,” pretty much all of the Avengers got new costumes, even characters like Thor that were not directly tied into the actual “Crossing” event. In the case of Thor, he was going through a tough time when it seemed like the World Tree was dying, sending the Asgardian gods into a spiral. So, Thor ended up getting a new oddly busy new costume, complete with a giant metal codpiece, plus long chains out of nowhere (seemingly out of the pages of “Spawn”) for his hammer.

The actual costume was not a bad design, but it seemed out of place for Thor to wear. The craziest thing, though, was that Thor didn’t even wear it! Despite being shown in promotional materials as his new look, he didn’t actually wear the costume, instead running around shirtless for most of the time that he was supposed to be wearing this new outfit. When he returned after temporarily dying with the rest of his teammates during “Onslaught,” he was back in his traditional costume.

GHOST RIDER (NOBLE KALE)

In 1990, Howard Mackie and Javier Saltares successfully re-launched Marvel’s Ghost Rider character, introducing a brand-new series starring a new version of the classic character. This new version was bonded with its human host, Dan Ketch, and wore black boots, gray pants and a black leather jacket. It was a classic biker look and it served the character well as Ketch became far more popular than the original Ghost Rider, Johnny Blaze (who wore a similar outfit as the original supernatural Ghost Rider).

While Blaze’s Ghost Rider had been due to a demon Zarathos, it was unclear how Ketch was empowered, until he learned that the “demonic” side of his being was actually that of Noble Kale, an ancestor of Ketch’s who had been cursed back in the 18th century and chose to kill himself rather than go through with the curse. Heaven and Hell fought over him and reached a compromise where he could possess his descendants and use them to transform into the Spirit of Vengeance. With this new knowledge, Noble decided to change his look, going for a bizarre choice of colors for a motorcycle-riding Spirit of Vengeance — lots of bright orange.

WARBIRD (RED ZONE)

After initially having her powers stolen by Rogue, Carol Danvers discovered new energy-based powers when she became the hero known as Binary. Eventually, those powers mostly burned out and she returned to Earth and sought to re-join the Avengers. Not wanting to use her old Ms. Marvel name, she instead adopted the codename Warbird during Kurt Busiek and George Perez’s run on “Avengers.” She served the team well, but ended up splitting from the team after she developed a drinking problem.

She returned to the team later in Busiek’s run and was in place when Geoff Johns took over writing the series (during that brief period where Johns was working for both DC Comics and Marvel Comics). Johns eventually wrote her out of the series at the end of the “Red Zone” arc, where she was offered a job in Homeland Security. Before she left, though, Olivier Coipel gave her an amazingly bland costume. It was basically just nondescript body armor. He was clearly going for a more militaristic look, but that didn’t need to equal boring.

THOR (GODPACK)

In the mid-1990s, Thor was in a strange place. After being missing for a few years while Eric Masterson took over as the new Thor, the Odinson returned and promptly came down with Warrior’s Madness and fought against Adam Warlock and the Infinity Watch. Once that was finished, Thor really didn’t particularly have anything to do, so incoming writer Roy Thomas tied him in with the High Evolutionary.

The High Evolutionary was always trying to create new superhuman teams and he succeeded with a new group of beings based on gods. Thor dubbed them the “Godpack” and actually joined their team. When he decided to join the group, he figured that he should get a new costume to commemorate the change. His new costume had one of the most unusual looks we’ve ever seen in a comic book costume. We’ve seen characters wear vests before, but not clothing only down the middle of the chest!

GUY GARDNER: WARRIOR (VULDARIAN ERA)

In 1994, DC Comics decided to dramatically revamp its “Green Lantern” line of books, which, at the time, had reached four ongoing series (three monthlies and a quarterly). The plan was to remove the Green Lantern Corps from the scene period and start over with a brand-new character being Green Lantern. As a result, DC canceled “Green Lantern: Mosaic” and “Green Lantern Corps Quarterly” and then had to make a major change in “Guy Gardner: Warrior,” a book where Guy Gardner used a yellow power ring (that was powered by Green Lantern rings).

Guy lost his ring (since there were no longer any Green Lantern Corps around to power it) and DC wanted him to get new powers. The Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers were popular at the time, so DC had Beau Smith try to do something similar with Guy, and Smith came up with the idea of Guy being part-alien. When he discovered his alien heritage, he gained the ability to transform his body into different weapons. He also now dressed like a member of his alien race, which involved tattoos all over his now-shirtless body.

WAR MACHINE (CROSSING ERA)

Around this same time, the comic book series “War Machine” was going through a similar issue as “Guy Gardner,” as it also wanted to distance itself from the comic book series that it spun off of, which was “Iron Man.” James Rhodes had been using a suit of armor designed by Tony Stark. Stark, though, was the villain of the “Avengers” crossover, “The Crossing,” and thus Rhodey could not get another suit of armor from him after Rhodey lost his original armor during a time traveling story arc.

Instead, Rhodes was chosen by some aliens to wear a special alien armor called WarWear. At first, he didn’t know why he was specifically chosen (it was his connection to Stark), so he thought it was some really weird coincidence that he lost an armor and then got new armor. This armor was intentionally designed to look very alien, but wow, it was really weird looking. When most of the Avengers (including Iron Man) were seemingly killed during “Onslaught,” Rhodes gave up the WarWear by sacrificing it to erase all information about the Iron Man technology from Stark Enterprises’ servers.

HAWKEYE (POST-KREE SKRULL WAR)

Interestingly enough, Clint Barton’s initial career as Hawkeye only lasted five years, as after five years under the Hawkeye name, Clint Barton adopted the growth powers and abandoned Goliath identity from Hank Pym (when Pym gave up on growing and became Yellowjacket). His Goliath costume was kind of goofy in and of itself, with the strange chest strap thing.

Anyhow, during the famous “Kree/Skrull War” storyline, the Avengers ended up in outer space and they all returned… except for Goliath. He wasn’t even gone a full issue before he showed up, to the great delight of his teammates. As it turned out, he had escaped back to Earth, as well, and landed in Eastern Europe where he got a job working in a traveling circus. Oddly enough, former Avenger Hercules was also in this circus (talk about coincidences!). Going back to his bowman ways, Hawkeye rocked an amusing, pants-less outfit. It did not last long.

HERCULES (CROSSING ERA AVENGERS)

Hercules had always been a bit of a tricky character for writers to incorporate into the Avengers due to the fact that he was a demigod living amongst mortals. His personality was so over-sized that he was a bit hard to relate to — he was basically just the strong guy on the team and the comic relief. When he returned to the Avengers during the famous Bob Harras/Steve Epting/Tom Palmer run, Harras tried to humanize the character more.

One of the ways he did so was to reduce his power level, as well as give Hercules a new costume (and a shave, since the Eric Masterson Thor was also on the team at the time and two bearded characters was apparently one beard too many). However, over time, the costume devolved to the point where it was basically just a stretched-out tank top. With his beard now gone, he sort of looked like a depressing Rocky Balboa, maybe from “Rocky V.”

BLACK CANARY (FLASHDANCE)

In the early 1980s, Black Canary was involved in one of the strangest retcons of all-time, when it was revealed that she was her own mother living in her comatose daughter’s body (her daughter was cursed with a Canary Cry, which explained why Canary suddenly had sonic powers). Eventually, the younger Canary then took back control of her own body. Wishing to distinguish herself from her mother, she then decided to get her own brand-new costume. It was a good idea, but the decision was made during the early 1980s and it very much embraced the fashion of the era.

It looked very much like something a superhero would wear to Jazzercise. The hilarious thing is that DC hyped up the new costume so much that they even homaged Canary’s original first cover appearance with the debut of the new look. The new look only lasted a few years before she re-embraced her mother’s style when she got her own solo feature in “Action Comics Weekly.” Artist Brian Bolland spoke for many comic book fans when he drew the cover of Canary’s first feature in “Action”…

You know a costume is bad when a whole cover is devoted just to burning it!

IRON MAN (NOSE ARMOR)

In 1972, Stan Lee officially became the Publisher of Marvel Comics. That ended his time as a regular ongoing writer for comics, but it was also a strange period in terms of his influence on the company. He was now above the Editor-In-Chief (a role a variety of creators went through between 1972-1978) but was not nearly as directly involved with the comics as he once was. He was mostly a hands-off boss. So when he did make comments, they were taken very seriously, but since he rarely discussed things, sometimes his directions would be misunderstood.

Lee once looked at a drawing of Iron Man that he thought looked like the helmet was drawn so small that a face couldn’t fit under it. He remarked, “Shouldn’t there be a nose?” That was taken to mean “Iron Man’s helmet should have a nose.” So, for a brief period, he did (to help scare villains — seriously!). In one comic, Iron Man went to San Diego Comic Con and everyone made fun of his new armor. Eventually, either Lee saw it and didn’t like it or people just got sick of it, so it was dropped. Hilarious stuff.

WONDER MAN (WEST COAST AVENGERS)

Wonder Man is the king of bad superhero costumes, and you could make an argument that a couple of his outfits belong on this list, but we don’t think any of them are egregious enough to quite crack the Top 15 except for this one, from 1986. You see, Wonder Man had moved to Hollywood to become an actor and when the Avengers opened up a West Coast branch, he was an easy pick for the team. However, as his profile rose with the new team in the area, he got cast in a major motion picture playing a version of the Conan-inpired Arkon.

His agent then got Wonder Man a brand-new, extremely garish costume. Again, this is a guy who had gone through some real stinkers in the past, but managed to top them all with this monstrosity. The Avengers then got lost in time for a long storyline. When they returned, writer Steve Englehart wrote the fan reaction to the costume into the comic, with movie fans within the comic book all expressing how much they hated his new look, so he changed back to his previous costume, which he has mostly kept since.

What do you think is the worst superhero costume ever? Let us know in the comments section!

The post The 15 Worst Superhero Costumes appeared first on CBR.

Optically excited structural transition fastest electronic switch ever observed

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from several institutions in Germany has used laser pulses to change an atomic wire from an insulator to a metal and back again in what the group describes as the fastest electronic switch ever observed. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes their experiments testing the boundaries of phase transition speeds, which have proven that it can occur much faster under certain conditions than was thought possible.

CO2 clathrate hydrate properties

Clathrate hydrates (Fig. 1) are cage-like structures of water molecules that house guest gas species. They form when the gas interacts with ice under high-pressure and low-temperature conditions, and are thought to influence the surface geology and composition of icy bodies in the Solar System. Although the importance of clathrates has long been recognised, previous studies of their formation and physical properties have mostly involved theoretical thermodynamic calculations for structures produced from pure water solutions. In new research, published in Astronomy & Astrophysics, however, carbon dioxide (CO2) clathrate hydrates produced from weak saline solutions have been investigated. The team of researchers, including PhD student Ms Emmal Safi, used the High Resolution Powder Diffraction beamline (I11) at Diamond Light Source to conduct an in situ study of clathrates that are more relevant to those produced in the salty oceans of icy moons. The results indicate substantial differences in the formation characteristics and physical properties of CO2 clathrates compared with those that form from pure water solutions. The new findings can be used to help calibrate and inform models of clathrate formation on Earth, and other planetary bodies.

Mobile phones are not always a cure for poverty in remote regions

A mobile phone is typically the first and only modern information communication technology for inhabitants of the most remote rural areas around world.

The 1-Second Trick That Will Help You Ace Every Workout

Fitness›Workout TipsSteal this secret from badass female rock climber Sasha DiGiulian Sasha DiGiulian knows a lot about conquering fear. She's been rock climbing since the age of six, and in 2012, Sasha became the the first US woman and the youngest female in the world to climb 5.14d. In climber speak that is hard — excruciatingly hard. To this day, there are very few climbers — men or women — who can say they've done a climb of such difficulty. I had a chance to see the Adidas athlete speak on a Future/Fit panel at SXSW, where she discussed the pressures of competing on a professional level and the lessons the everyday athlete, like you and I, can take from her own trials and tribulations. A week later, I keep going back to a specific tip she offered the audience. Similar to having a mantra that powers you through a workout, Sasha's ritual is something all of us can do when exercising and, really, in any difficult situation. "The last thing I do before leaving the ground — whether it's 100 feet or 1,000 feet — is I smile," Sasha said. "That puts me in the zone to perform well. Even if smiling isn't your go-to, find what does put you there and create a habit of it." Sasha's tip goes well beyond a fake-it-till-you-make-it trick. Several studies have shown that a smile is one of the most powerful tools we have in our arsenal. A forced smile can almost instantly improve your mood, decrease stress, and over time, change your tendency to have negative thoughts. The next time you're headed into the gym, are faced by a daunting long run, or are just wanting to give up, try smiling. It may feel terribly forced and cheesy, but it's likely you'll go into your workout feeling better than you did one minute prior. Excuse us while we swap out our pre-workout smoothie with a smile. This article originally appeared on Popsugar Fitness. More from Popsugar: 4 Workouts You Should Try with Your Significant Other The Secret to Burning More Calories in Zumba This CrossFit Workout May Sound Insane, But It's Totally Doable , ,

Someone Tried To Come For Kim Kardashian, But John Legend Shut It Down

Friends who go to Waffle House together defend each other.

At this point, nasty things written on the internet probably slide offKim Kardashianlike water off a duck’s back ― but as forJohn Legend, well, that’s a different story.

More...

Someone Tried To Come For Kim Kardashian, But John Legend Shut It Down

Friends who go to Waffle House together defend each other.

At this point, nasty things written on the internet probably slide offKim Kardashianlike water off a duck’s back ― but as forJohn Legend, well, that’s a different story.

More...

US astronaut breaks record for most spacewalks by a woman

American astronaut Peggy Whitson made history when she floated outside the International Space Station on Thursday, breaking the record for the most spacewalks by a woman.

Deadly pathogen to cure itself?

A Massey professor of microbiology has led new research that could yield a vaccine against an emerging deadly pathogen that has proven resistant to various treatments.

Fungal viruses cross the barriers between distantly related fungal species

According to research conducted at the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), some fungal viruses (mycoviruses) that infect fungi associated with forest trees are able to cross the barriers between distantly related fungal species. This overturns the former theory that mycoviruses are host specific, and will create new perspectives on their possible roles in regulating forest biodiversity.

Harmful bacteria discovered in both amphibians and mammals

Brucella bacteria have a not-so-illustrious reputation for causing illness and death in mammals.

Trump Needs To Dump Ryan

In 1994, Republican outsider State Senator George Pataki beat Mario Cuomo and became the governor of New York. The first thing he did was dump the sitting Republican Senate Majority Leader Ralph Marino and install his own choice, Joe Bruno. Pataki knew what Donald Trump doesn’t. You don’t want a legislative leader with his own base and agenda. You want a weakened and beholden leader whose first loyalty is to you, not the legislature and certainly not ideology.

For reasons that remain unclear, Trump got this wrong. He embraced Paul Ryan, a hard right-wing ideologue who had been propelled to power by the Freedom Caucus when it dumped Speaker John Boehner. Worse, we was an anti-Trumpite and said so publicly. Ryan has played out predictably. He’s forced Trump to his right, to a set of positions that are widely unpopular and which Trump himself never embraced. Worse again, he lost control of his caucus.

More...

Trump Needs To Dump Ryan

In 1994, Republican outsider State Senator George Pataki beat Mario Cuomo and became the governor of New York. The first thing he did was dump the sitting Republican Senate Majority Leader Ralph Marino and install his own choice, Joe Bruno. Pataki knew what Donald Trump doesn’t. You don’t want a legislative leader with his own base and agenda. You want a weakened and beholden leader whose first loyalty is to you, not the legislature and certainly not ideology.

For reasons that remain unclear, Trump got this wrong. He embraced Paul Ryan, a hard right-wing ideologue who had been propelled to power by the Freedom Caucus when it dumped Speaker John Boehner. Worse, we was an anti-Trumpite and said so publicly. Ryan has played out predictably. He’s forced Trump to his right, to a set of positions that are widely unpopular and which Trump himself never embraced. Worse again, he lost control of his caucus.

More...

Even short-duration heat waves could lead to failure of coffee crops

"Hot coffee" is not a good thing for java enthusiasts when it refers to plants beset by the high-temperature stress that this century is likely to bring, research at Oregon State University suggests.

Fewer malfunctions and lower costs thanks to smarter maintenance model

Researchers at the University of Twente have developed a mathematical model for improving the maintenance schedule for trains, rails, aircraft, self-driving cars, robots and nuclear power plants.

Student writing project exposes NYC’s illegal ivory trade

In spring 2016, student Wendy Hapgood walked around midtown Manhattan, visiting antique stores advertising mammoth ivory for sale that she found on Google maps. "Mammoth tusk is so interesting," she explained, "A piece of ancient past, a long extinct mammal, dug up in the tundra in Russia, sent to China for carving, then finding its way here."

Roosters are nicer to their relatives than to other males

Male domestic fowl are less aggressive towards related males than to unrelated males when competing for copulations, according to a new study from Linköping University in Sweden. This finding, which has been published in the scientific journal Behavioral Ecology, suggests that domestic fowl can recognise their kin among individuals in a group, and that their behaviour is different towards kin and non-kin.

Designing cities to withstand natural disasters

What happens after Cyclone Debbie is a familiar process. It has been repeated many times in cities around the world. The reason is that our cities are not designed for these types of events.

Nanomagnets for future data storage

An international team of researchers led by chemists from ETH Zurich have developed a method for depositing single magnetisable atoms onto a surface. This is especially interesting for the development of new miniature data storage devices.

Lionfish Are a Plague. Can Training Sharks to Eat Them Work?

Lionfish, which are native to the Indo-Pacific but were accidentally introduced to the Caribbean, are decimating native fish species

I Kept Track of How Much Garbage I Made in a Week—the Results Weren’t Pretty

Turns out, I'm a slob. You probably are, too. Thankfully, there are a lot of easy ways to reduce the amount of garbage you make.

Study shows the importance of coastal water quality to recreational beach users

Coasts around the world are threatened by land-based pollutants, including sewage, which affect water quality, coastal habitats and human experiences. To capture the value people place on the coastal environment, UH ecological economist Kirsten L.L. Oleson and former MS student Marcus Peng recently published a study in the journal Ecological Economics. Titled "Beach Recreationalists' Willingness to Pay and Economic Implications of Coastal Water Quality Problems in Hawaiʻi," the study found that improvements in coastal environmental conditions could result in large benefits for beach users on Oʻahu, in some cases valued in the hundreds of millions of dollars. This could justify increased spending on management and restoration.

Increase in gas prices associated with increase in child maltreatment

Increases in gasoline prices are associated with increases in child maltreatment referral rates, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

Finding a ‘lost’ planet, about the size of Neptune

Yale astronomers have discovered a "lost" planet that is nearly the size of Neptune and tucked away in a solar system 3,000 light years from Earth.

Cuts to sole parent benefits are human rights violations

Sole parents in Australia are economically vulnerable and are experiencing ongoing cuts to their social security. Legislation limiting welfare benefits that was rushed through the Senate last week will make many of them poorer – but how is this a human rights issue?

Who gains most from high-skilled foreign workers?

Foreign computer scientists granted H-1B visas to work in the United States during the IT boom of the 1990s had a significant impact on workers, consumers and tech companies.

Researchers work on carbon dioxide capture systems

A Missouri University of Science and Technology researcher and her team are developing technology that could help keep astronauts safe from carbon dioxide buildup during flight and aboard the International Space Station.

World’s oldest spacewoman sets spacewalking record – Washington Post

Washington Post
World's oldest spacewoman sets spacewalking record
Washington Post
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — The world's oldest and most experienced spacewoman has just set another record, this time for spacewalking. NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson floated out on the eighth spacewalk of her career Thursday morning, 250 miles up at...
Live Now: Astronauts perform second of three scheduled spacewalks at International Space Stationwtkr.com
WATCH LIVE: ISS spacewalk to see Nasa astronauts step out of space stationExpress.co.uk
[ March 30, 2017 ] Kimbrough, Whitson prepare for spacewalk Thursday Mission ReportsSpaceflight Now
Engadget-Deccan Chronicle-News Nation-Yahoo News
all 14 news articles

An enzyme keeps the parasites of the genome in check and turns them into an evolutionary advantage

Jumping genes are double-edged sword: By copying and integrating themselves into other parts of the genome these so-called transposons can lead to a variety of genetic disorders such as haemophilia or breast cancer. On the other hand the mobile DNA bits can create new genes and new gene expression programs. This is crucial for maintaining high genetic variability and adaptability to environmental changes. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics Freiburg in collaboration with the University of Freiburg have now found that an enzyme called DHX9 can neutralize the harmful structures formed by transposons and effectively increase the tolerance of the genome to include these jumping genes. By understanding this process better scientists can devise better therapies for diseases caused by transposons while retaining their evolutionary advantage.

Researchers look for genetic clues to help grapes survive cold

Months before northern vineyards burst into their lush summer peak, the delicate grape buds holding the nascent fruit in its tiny core must first withstand the freezing onslaught of winter.

Climate change contributes to mental illness

depressed man Health

It makes us a little nuts

A new report highlights the ways in which climate change can hurt our mental health. Read on:…

Team predicts increasing decline of hemlock as winters warm

Land managers in New England and eastern New York state have a new tool to help identify eastern hemlock stands at greatest risk for rapid growth decline by evaluating stresses on the trees, including response to the hemlock woolly adelgid and changes resulting from a warming climate.

Image: The splitting of the dunes

The mound in the center of this Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) image appears to have blocked the path of the dunes as they marched south (north is to the left in this image) across the scene. Many of these transverse dunes have slipfaces that face south, although in some cases, it's hard to tell for certain. Smaller dunes run perpendicular to some of the larger-scale dunes, probably indicating a shift in wind directions in this area.

Unique genome architectures after fertilisation in single-cell embryos

Using a newly developed method, researchers at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IMBA) have been able to shed light on the complexity of genome reorganization occurring during the first hours after fertilization in the single-cell mammalian embryo. Their findings have recently been published in the journal Nature. The team of researchers (from three continents) have discovered that the egg and sperm genomes that co-exist in the single-cell embryo or zygote have a unique structure compared to other interphase cells. Understanding this specialized chromatin "ground state" has the potential to provide insights into the yet mysterious process of epigenetic reprogramming to totipotency, the ability to give rise to all cell types.
Go to Top

Hit Counter provided by Seo Australia